Eric Rosenfeld

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Eric R. Rosenfeld was a trader and principal at Long-Term Capital Management, a major hedge fund that failed during the Russian financial crisis.

Early life[edit]

Mr. Rosenfeld was born in Boston, Massachusetts in June 1953. He received his B.S in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975 and a Ph.D. in Finance from MIT in 1979. As a graduate student at MIT, he worked with Mitch Kapor, future founder of Lotus, to create and sell a financial statistics program written in BASIC for an Apple II.[1]

From 1979 to 1984, Rosenfeld was an assistant professor of finance at Harvard Business School. At HBS, he taught the first year finance course.


In July 1984, Rosenfeld joined Salomon Brothers as a trader in the Government Arbitrage Group. In 1985, he was appointed Vice President and in 1988, he was made Managing Director and co-Head of the Fixed Income Arbitrage Group. Rosenfeld was appointed head of the Government Trading Department, co-Head of the Domestic Fixed Income Sales and Trading Department, and a member of the Salomon Brothers Executive Committee in August 1991. He also served on the Risk Management and Capital Allocation committees until he left the firm in January of 1993.[2]

He then joined John Meriwether and a group of Salomon Brothers traders in starting Long-Term Capital Management.

About one year after LTCM's rescue, in 1999, he joined John Meriwether as a partner in JWM Partners LLC, which started operations with about $250 million under management. He left JWM Partners to join Paloma Partners, a Greenwich fund-of-funds.

In 2007, Rosenfeld founded Quantitative Alternatives LLC in Rye Brook, NY with Bruce Wilson and Robert Shustak.[3] The firm closed in late 2007.[4]


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