Erie Otters

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Erie Otters
Erieotters.png
City Erie, Pennsylvania
League Ontario Hockey League
Conference Western
Division Midwest
Founded 1996 (1996)–97
Home arena Erie Insurance Arena
Colors Navy blue, red, gold, white
                   
General manager Sherwood Bassin
Head coach Kris Knoblauch

Website
www.ottershockey.com
Franchise history
1946–53 Windsor Spitfires
1953–60 Hamilton Tiger Cubs
1960–74 Hamilton Red Wings
1974–76 Hamilton Fincups
1976–77 St. Catharines Fincups
1977–78 Hamilton Fincups
1978–84 Brantford Alexanders
1984–88 Hamilton Steelhawks
1988–96 Niagara Falls Thunder
1996–present Erie Otters

The Erie Otters are a major junior ice hockey team based in Erie, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Ontario Hockey League, one of only three American teams in the circuit. The team takes its name from the North American river otter, a semiaquatic mammal commonly found by Lake Erie.

History[edit]

The Erie Otters were previously located in Niagara Falls, Ontario, where they were called the Niagara Falls Thunder. They moved to downtown Erie's Erie Insurance Arena in 1996.

The Otters' first three seasons in Erie were not kind to them, especially because they were eliminated in the first round of the OHL playoffs each year. However, they saw success in 1999 by capturing the Holody Trophy, which is the league's award for winning the Midwest Division championship. It would be their first of three consecutive Midwest Division championships, culminating in an J. Ross Robertson Cup in 2001–02. Additionally, Dave MacQueen won the Matt Leyden Trophy in 2000–01 as the OHL Coach of the Year and Sherwood Bassin was awarded OHL Executive of the Year for his role in building a championship team as general manager. The Erie Otters became the second American team to win the OHL Championship after the 1995 champions Detroit Junior Red Wings (now the Plymouth Whalers).

The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) officially partnered with the Erie Otters in 2012. As part of the deal, LECOM is the team's official medical provider.[1]

Connor McDavid Era (2012-15)[edit]

Connor McDavid was the Erie Otters first overall draft pick in the 2012 OHL Priority Selection, after being granted exceptional status by the OHL. In his rookie year, the still woeful Otters won 19 games and finished 19th in th OHL standings. McDavid broke the Erie record for the assists by a rookie previously set by Tim Connolly in 1997-98.Overall McDavid finished his rookie season with 25 goals and 66 points to lead all rookies in scoring.

In the 2013-14 season, the Otters improved greatly due to the rise of overagers Connor Brown and Dane Fox as well as the continuing ascension of Connor McDavid. The Otters finished 2nd in the Midwest division behind the to-be OHL champions Guelph Storm. Brown set new marks for points by an Otter and won the OHL points race and was awarded the Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy. In the Playoffs, the Otters defeated the Saginaw Spirit in 5 games and advanced to face the Saulte Ste. Marie Greyhounds where they swept out of the playoffs in 4 games.

In the 2014-15 OHL season, in what would be Connor McDavid's final season in the OHL, the Otters decided to make a run for the Memorial Cup. Doing they loaded up the squad by acquiring Remi Elie from Belleville and Nick Baptiste from Sudbury. In November, McDavid broke his hand in a fight against Mississauga. The incident sparked outrage in the hockey community, many saying that he should not have been fighting at all. Due to the close proximity to the 2015 IIHF WJC many feared he would miss the showcase hosted in Toronto and Montreal. However McDavid would eventually play in the tournament and play a critical role in helping Canada win the title for the first time in 6 years. The Otters eventually won the Midwest division and qualified for the playoffs as the number 2 seed. Dylan Strome won the OHL scoring title with a 126 points in 68 games. McDavid however was award the Red Tilson trophy as the OHL's most outstanding player. (120 pts. in 47 games). In the playoffs Erie handily beat Sarnia and London en route to the Western Conference Final against the number 1 ranked team in Canada, the Saulte Ste. Marie Greyhounds.The Otter would eventually prevail in 5 games with McDavid leading the Erie offence. In the OHL final against the Oshawa Generals, the Gens would prove to be too much for the Otters as the Generals would win the OHL Final in 5 games. McDavid won the Wayne Gretzky Award for playoff MVP with 49 points in 20 games.

Uniforms and logos[edit]

The Erie Otters' colors are navy blue, red, gold, and white. Their primary logo includes a red circle with a fierce-looking otter holding a hockey stick and wearing playing equipment. The "Otters" wordmark is superimposed over the design in red with gold and navy blue outline. The team's home uniforms comprise a solid navy blue design with red and gold accents while the away uniforms feature a white jersey and socks.

For the 2013 season, the Erie Otters introduced a new yellow alternate jersey. This jersey is solid yellow, with the "Otters" wordmark across the chest. This jersey includes blue shoulder stripes, white and blue stripes on the arms and bottom of the jersey, navy blue pants, and yellow socks featuring white and blue stripes. This new alternate jersey has been mentioned as a homage to the past Erie Blades uniforms.[2]

Arena[edit]

The Erie Otters play home games at the Erie Insurance Arena located in downtown Erie, Pennsylvania. The arena was built in 1981 and seats 5,500 spectators. The arena is part of the Erie Civic Center Complex, which includes Jerry Uht Park — a baseball stadium for the Double-A Erie SeaWolves. In May 2012, the Erie County Convention Center Authority and the Erie Insurance Group announced a 10-year, $3 million naming agreement that will rename the former Louis J. Tullio Arena, "Erie Insurance Arena." This renaming coincides with the completion of the current $42-million dollar renovation project that is currently underway and was completed in September 2013.[3] The renovation, designed by Friday/Sink Combs Dethlefs Joint Venture Architects, modernized Erie Insurance Arena and added some new sections and a landscaped park entrance. Construction on the project was carried by the Pittsburgh-based Turner Construction Company. Improvements to Erie Insurance Arena included additional seating and concourses. To accommodate these new additions, its footprint expanded from the original 152,000-square-foot (14,100 m2) to 218,000-square-foot (20,300 m2). This increased the venue's capacity to 6,500 for hockey, 6,750 for basketball and about 9,000 for concerts. After the renovations had completed in September 2013, Erie Insurance Arena now has enlarged lobbies and more box offices, luxury suites, administrative offices, mechanical rooms, training areas, new locker rooms, and a team store.

Championships[edit]

Coaches[edit]

Dave MacQueen won the Matt Leyden Trophy in 2000–01 as the OHL Coach of the Year.

Multiple years in parentheses

Players[edit]

A total of 21 players have been selected at the National Hockey League Entry Draft since the franchise relocated to Erie, including a five-year stretch from 1997–2001 in which seven members of the team were selected in the first round: (1997 Jason Ward, 11th, Montreal Canadiens; 1998 Michael Rupp, ninth, New York Islanders; 1999 Tim Connolly, fifth, New York Islanders; 2000 Nikita Alexeev, eighth, Tampa Bay Lightning; Brad Boyes, 24th, Toronto Maple Leafs; 2001 Carlo Colaiacovo, 17th, Toronto Maple Leafs; and Adam Munro, 29th, Chicago Blackhawks).

Award winners[edit]

NHL alumni[edit]

Retired numbers[edit]

Current roster[edit]

Updated April 29th, 2015

Goaltenders
# Player Born Place of birth Drafted
31 United States Devin Williams 1995 Saginaw, Michigan Eligible 2015
35 Canada Daniel Dekoning 1996 Listowel, Ontario Eligbile 2015
Defencemen
# Player Born Place of birth Drafted
3 Canada Cory Genovese 1994 (OA) Hespeler, Ontario Undrafted
6 Canada Patrick Murphy 1995 Hamilton, Ontario Eligible 2015
23 Canada Kurtis MacDermid 1994 (OA) Sauble Beach, Ontario LA - Free Agent 2012
24 Canada Darren Raddysh 1996 Caledon, Ontario Eligible 2015
25 Canada T.J. Fergus 1997 Oakville, Ontario Eligible 2015
42 Canada Mitchell Byrne 1998 Brampton, Ontario Eligible 2016
44 Canada Travis Dermott 1996 Newmarket, Ontario Eligible 2015
57 United States Troy Donnay 1994 (OA) Fenton, Michigan NYR - Free Agent 2013
Forwards
# Player Position Born Place of birth Drafted
9 Canada Kyle Maksimovich LW 1998 Hamilton, Ontario Eligible 2016
10 United States Shaun Bily C 1998 Doylestown, Pennsylvania Eligible 2016
11 Canada Mason Marchment RW 1995 Uxbridge, Ontario Eligible 2015
12 United States Alex DeBrincat C 1997 Detroit, Michigan Eligible 2016
14 Canada Nicholas Baptiste RW 1995 Ottawa, Ontario BUF – Round 3, 69 overall – 2013
15 Canada Kyle Pettit C 1996 Komoka, Ontario VAN – Round 6, 156 overall – 2014
17 Canada Taylor Raddysh RW 1998 Caledon, Ontario Eligible 2016
19 Canada Dylan Strome C 1997 Mississauga, Ontario ARI - Round 1, 3 overall - 2015
21 Canada Patrick Fellows LW 1997 Toronto, Ontario Eligible 2015
26 Canada Quentin Maksimovich C 1996 Hamilton, Ontario Eligible 2015
27 Canada Jake Marchment C 1995 Ajax, Ontario LAK – Round 6, 157 overall – 2014
29 United States Nick Betz RW 1995 Clinton Township, Michigan Eligible 2015
81 Canada Remi Elie LW 1995 Green Valley, Ontario DAL – Round 2, 40 overall – 2013
97 Canada Connor McDavid C 1997 Newmarket, Ontario EDM - Round 1, 1 overall - 2015

Note: (OA) = Overage player

Team records[edit]

Team records for a single season
Statistic Total Season
Most points 106 2013–14
Most wins 52 2013–14
Most goals for 331 2014–15
Least goals for 169 2011–12
Least goals against 170 2013–14
Most goals against 378 2006–07
Individual player records for a single season
Statistic Player Total Season
Most goals Dane Fox 64 2013–14
Most assists Dylan Strome 84 2014–15
Most points Dylan Strome 129 2014–15
Most points, rookie Alex DeBrincat 104 2014–15
Most points, defenceman Chris Campoli 66 2003–04
Best GAA (goalie) Adam Munro 2.31 2000–01
Goalies = minimum 1500 minutes played

Season-by-season results[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Legend: OTL - Overtime Loss, SL - Shootout Loss, PTS - Points, GF - Goals For, GA - Goals Against

Season Games Won Lost Tie OTL SL PTS PCT% GF GA Standing
1996–97 66 23 36 7 - - 53 0.402 240 260 5th Central
1997–98 66 33 28 5 - - 71 0.538 261 252 4th West
1998–99 68 31 33 4 - - 66 0.485 271 297 3rd Midwest
1999–00 68 33 28 4 3 - 73 0.515 224 229 1st Midwest
2000–01 68 45 11 10 2 - 102 0.735 264 171 1st Midwest
2001–02 68 41 22 4 1 - 87 0.632 246 218 1st Midwest
2002–03 68 24 35 6 3 - 57 0.397 181 248 5th Midwest
2003–04 68 29 26 6 7 - 71 0.471 221 212 5th Midwest
2004–05 68 31 26 6 5 - 73 0.500 186 207 4th Midwest
2005–06 68 26 35 - 4 3 59 0.434 219 266 5th Midwest
2006–07 68 15 50 - 1 2 33 0.243 209 378 5th Midwest
2007–08 68 18 46 - 2 2 40 0.294 206 343 5th Midwest
2008–09 68 34 29 - 3 2 73 0.537 208 254 3rd Midwest
2009–10 68 33 28 - 5 2 73 0.537 257 259 4th Midwest
2010–11 68 40 26 - 1 1 82 0.603 281 229 3rd Midwest
2011–12 68 10 52 - 3 3 26 0.191 169 338 5th Midwest
2012–13 68 19 40 - 4 5 47 0.346 206 312 5th Midwest
2013–14 68 52 14 - 2 0 106 0.779 312 170 2nd Midwest
2014–15 68 50 14 - 2 2 104 0.765 331 212 1st Midwest

Playoffs[edit]

  • 1996–97 Lost to Guelph Storm 4 games to 1 in division quarter-finals.
  • 1997–98 Lost to London Knights 4 games to 3 in division quarter-finals.
  • 1998–99 Lost to Guelph Storm 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 1999–2000 Defeated Brampton Battalion 4 games to 2 in conference quarter-finals.
    Lost to S.S. Marie Greyhounds 4 games to 3 in conference semi-finals.
  • 2000–01 Defeated London Knights 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
    Defeated Brampton Battalion 4 games to 1 in conference semi-finals.
    Lost to Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 1 in conference finals.
  • 2001–02 Defeated Sarnia Sting 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
    Defeated London Knights 4 games to 2 in conference semi-finals.
    Defeated Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 1 in conference finals.
    Defeated Barrie Colts 4 games to 1 in finals. OHL CHAMPIONS
    Lost to Victoriaville Tigres 5-4 (OT) in the Memorial Cup semi-finals.
  • 2002–03 Out of playoffs.
  • 2003–04 Defeated Sarnia Sting 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
    Lost to London Knights 4 games to 0 in conference semi-finals.
  • 2004–05 Lost to Kitchener Rangers 4 games to 2 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2005–06 Out of playoffs.
  • 2006–07 Out of playoffs.
  • 2007–08 Out of playoffs.
  • 2008–09 Lost to London Knights 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2009–10 Lost to Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 0 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2010–11 Lost to Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 3 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2011–12 Out of playoffs.
  • 2012–13 Out of playoffs.
  • 2013-14 Defeated Saginaw Spirit 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
    Defeated Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 4 games to 0 in conference semi-finals.
    Lost to Guelph Storm 4 games to 1 in conference finals.
  • 2014-15 Defeated Sarnia Sting 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
    Defeated London Knights 4 games to 0 in conference semi-finals.
    Defeated Sault Ste. Marie 4 games to 2 in conference finals.
    Lost to Oshawa Generals 4 games to 1 in finals.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "LECOM becomes official medical provider...". Otters Hockey.com. Retrieved October 6, 2012. 
  2. ^ Creamer, Chris. "New Otters Jersey Evokes Memories of the Blades". SportsLogos.net Blog. Retrieved 18 March 2013. 

External links[edit]