Erie Otters

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Erie Otters
Erie Otters.PNG
City Erie, Pennsylvania
League Ontario Hockey League
Conference Western
Division Midwest
Founded 1996 (1996)–97
Home arena Erie Insurance Arena
Colors Gold, navy blue, white[1]
              
Owner(s) Jim Waters
General manager Dave Brown
Head coach Chris Hartsburg
Website ottershockey.com
Franchise history
1946–1953 Windsor Spitfires
1953–1960 Hamilton Tiger Cubs
1960–1974 Hamilton Red Wings
1974–1978 Hamilton/St. Catharines Fincups
1978–1984 Brantford Alexanders
1984–1988 Hamilton Steelhawks
1988–1996 Niagara Falls Thunder
1996–present Erie Otters

The Erie Otters are a Major junior ice hockey team based in Erie, Pennsylvania. They are members of the Midwest division of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), one of only three American teams in the circuit. The "Otters" name refers to the North American otter (Lontra canadensis), a semiaquatic mammal common to Lake Erie.

History[edit]

The Erie Otters were previously located in Niagara Falls, Ontario, where they were called the Niagara Falls Thunder. They moved to Erie Insurance Arena in downtown Erie in time for the 1996–97 season. After three seasons of mediocrity in Erie, they won the Midwest Division's Holody Trophy in 1999. It was their first of three consecutive Midwest Division championships, culminating in a J. Ross Robertson Cup in the 2001–02 season. Additionally, Dave MacQueen won the Matt Leyden Trophy in 2000–01 as the OHL Coach of the Year. General manager Sherwood Bassin was awarded OHL Executive of the Year, and the CHL Executive of the Year for his role in building a championship team.[2][3] The Erie Otters became the second U.S. team to win the OHL Championship, following the Detroit Junior Red Wings in the 1994–95 OHL season.

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) officially partnered with the Erie Otters in 2012 as their official medical provider.[4]

On March 18, 2017, the Erie Otters became the first team in Canadian Hockey League history to record four consecutive 50-win seasons in a row (2013–17).[5] The Otters had previously shared the record of three consecutive 50-win seasons with the Kelowna Rockets (2012–15), Edmonton Oil Kings (2011–14), Saint John Sea Dogs (2009–12) and the Kamloops Blazers (1989–92).

On May 22, 2017, the Erie Otters set a Memorial Cup record for most goals by one team in a single game by defeating the Saint John Sea Dogs with a final score of 12–5, surpassing the previous record of 11 goals set by the Quebec Remparts (1974, 11–3) and Regina Pats (1980, 11–2). The game also set the record for most goals by both teams with a total of 17 goals, surpassing the record of 16 goals when the Kitchener Rangers defeated the Kamloop Jr. Oilers with a final score of 9–7 (1984). Dylan Strome set an individual record of 7 points in a single game (4 goals, 3 assists) surpassing the previous record of 6 points in a single game held by Joe Contini (1976), Guy Rouleau (1986), and Mike Mathers (1992). Taylor Raddysh also tied the previous record of 6 points (2 goals, 4 assists) in the same game.[6]

Connor McDavid era (2012–15)[edit]

Connor McDavid, a Canadian center, played for the Erie Otters from 2012 to 2015, before joining the Edmonton Oilers of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Otters chose him as their first overall pick in the OHL Priority Selection Draft. The NHL Central Scouting Bureau subsequently named McDavid the top North American prospect for the 2015 NHL Entry Draft, where the Oilers selected him first overall.[7][8] The Greater Toronto Hockey League named McDavid "Player of the Year" for the 2011–12 season following a record of 79 goals and 130 assists. Hockey Canada, the governing body for amateur hockey in Canada, granted McDavid "Exceptional Player" status, which permitted him to play in the OHL a year earlier than would otherwise be permissible for a player his age. He was only the third player to receive that status, after John Tavares and Aaron Ekblad.[9]

Uniforms and logos[edit]

From their first season until the end of the 2016–17 season, the Erie Otters' colors were navy blue, gold, red, and white. Their primary logo featured a circular outline with a fierce, anthropomorphic otter furnishing a hockey stick and gear. The "Otters" wordmark is superimposed over the design in red with gold and navy blue outline. The team's home uniform included a navy blue sweater with red and gold accents. The away uniforms featured a white jersey with navy blue and red trim.

For the 2013–14 season, the Erie Otters introduced a gold alternate jersey. This jersey features a navy blue shoulder yoke, navy blue and white stripes, and the cursive "Otters" wordmark centered across the chest. The design resembles the sweaters of the defunct Erie Blades, who played from 1975 to 1982.[10] In 2016, the Erie Otters began wearing the gold alternate jerseys for every Saturday home game throughout the regular season and also introduced gold helmets to the uniform set, rather than the blue helmets worn with the gold jersey in previous seasons.

For the 2017–18 season, the Erie Otters announced that the secondary cursive "Otters" watermark has become their new primary logo and the team is making a full-time switch to a gold, navy and white color set. With this change, the alternate gold jerseys have become the new primary home set, and a newly introduced white jersey (in the same style as the gold) has become the new away set.[11]

Arena[edit]

The Erie Otters play their home games at Erie Insurance Arena, which opened in 1981 and currently seats 6,716 spectators. It is a centerpiece of the Erie Civic Center Complex, which also includes the UPMC Park baseball stadium, home to the Double-A Erie SeaWolves.

Championships[edit]

J. Ross Robertson Cup Wayne Gretzky Trophy Hamilton Spectator Trophy Holody Trophy
OHL Champions Western Conference Champions 1st Place - Regular Season Midwest Division Champions

2001–02

2016–17

2001–02

2014–15

2016–17

2000–01

2015–16

2016–17

1999–00

2000–01

2001–02

2014–15

2015–16

2016–17

Coaches[edit]

* indicates replacement mid-season.

Regular Season Playoffs Memorial Cup
Coach First Season Last Season GP W L T OTL SOL PTS PCT% GP W L PCT% GP W L PCT% Notes
Chris Johnstone 1996-97 1996-97* 39 11 25 3 0 0 25 .321 - - - - - - - -
Dale Dunbar 1996-97* 1997-98 93 45 36 9 3 0 102 .548 12 4 8 .333 - - - - Mid-season replacement for Johnstone during 1996-97 season.
Paul Theriault 1998-99 1998-99 68 31 33 4 0 0 66 .485 5 1 4 .200 - - - -
Dave MacQueen 1999-2000 2005-06 476 229 183 36 25 3 522 .548 64 38 26 .594 4 2 2 .500
Peter Sidorkiewicz 2006-07 2007-08* 84 19 62 0 1 2 41 .244 - - - - - - - -
Robbie Ftorek 2007-08* 2012-13* 353 139 174 0 16 13 307 .436 16 4 12 .250 - - - - Mid-season replacement for Sidorkiewicz during 2007-08 season.
Kris Knoblauch 2012-13* 2016-17 313 216 83 0 9 5 446 .712 69 46 23 .667 5 3 2 .600 Mid-season replacement for Ftorek during 2012-13 season.
Chris Hartsburg 2017-18 Present 63 21 32 0 7 3 52 .413 - - - .000 - - - .000

Award winners[edit]

Season Coach Award Won Award For
2000-01 Dave MacQueen Matt Leyden Trophy Coach of the Year
2015-16 Kris Knoblauch Matt Leyden Trophy Coach of the Year

Players[edit]

Award winners[edit]

Season Player(s) Award Won Award For
1999-00 Brad Boyes CHL Scholastic Player of the Year Award
Bobby Smith Trophy OHL Scholastic Player of the Year
2000-01 Brad Boyes Red Tilson Trophy Most Outstanding Player
William Hanley Trophy Most Sportsmanlike Player
Joey Sullivan Dan Snyder Memorial Trophy Humanitarian of the Year
2001-02 Brad Boyes CHL Sportsman of the Year Award
Red Tilson Trophy Most Outstanding Player
William Hanley Trophy Most Sportsmanlike Player
Wayne Gretzky 99 Award OHL Playoffs MVP
Cory Pecker Leo Lalonde Memorial Trophy Overage Player of the Year
2003-04 Chris Campoli CHL Humanitarian of the Year
Dan Snyder Memorial Trophy Humanitarian of the Year
2006-07 Derrick Bagshaw Roger Neilson Memorial Award Top Academic University Player
Ryan O’Reilly Jack Ferguson Award First Overall Draft Pick
2011-12 Connor McDavid Jack Ferguson Award First Overall Draft Pick
Adam Pelech Bobby Smith Trophy Scholastic Player of the Year
Ivan Tennant Memorial Award Top Academic High School Player
2012-13 Connor McDavid Emms Family Award Top First Year Player
2013-14 Connor Brown Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy OHL Leading Scorer
Jim Mahon Memorial Trophy Top Scoring Right Winger
Red Tilson Trophy Most Outstanding Player
CHL Top Scorer Award Highest Scoring Player in CHL
Dane Fox Leo Lalonde Memorial Trophy Overage Player of the Year
Connor McDavid William Hanley Trophy Most Sportsmanlike Player
Bobby Smith Trophy Scholastic Player of the Year
Oscar Dansk & Devin Williams Dave Pinkney Trophy Lowest Team Goals Against
2014-15 Connor McDavid Red Tilson Trophy Most Outstanding Player
Bobby Smith Trophy Scholastic Player of the Year
Wayne Gretzky 99 Award OHL Playoffs MVP
CHL Player of the Year
CHL Top Draft Prospect Award Top Eligible Draft Prospect in CHL
Dylan Strome Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy OHL Leading Scorer
William Hanley Trophy Most Sportsmanlike Player
CHL Top Scorer Award Highest Scoring Player in CHL
Alex DeBrincat Emms Family Award Top First Year Player
CHL Rookie of the Year
2016-17 Alex DeBrincat Red Tilson Trophy Most Outstanding Player
Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy OHL Leading Scorer
Jim Mahon Memorial Trophy Top Scoring Right Winger
CHL Player of the Year
Darren Raddysh Leo Lalonde Memorial Trophy Overage Player of the Year
Max Kaminsky Trophy Defenceman of the Year
Warren Foegele Wayne Gretzky 99 Award OHL Playoffs MVP
Dylan Strome Stafford Smythe Memorial Trophy Memorial Cup MVP
Dylan Strome & Taylor Raddysh Ed Chynoweth Trophy Memorial Cup Leading Scorer(s)
Anthony Cirelli George Parsons Trophy Memorial Cup Most Sportsmanlike Player

NHL alumni[edit]

NHL draft picks[edit]

A total of 37 players have been selected at the National Hockey League Entry Draft since the franchise relocated to Erie, including a five-year stretch from 1997–2001 in which seven members of the team were selected in the first round: Jason Ward (1997: 11th), Michael Rupp (1998: 9th), Tim Connolly (1999: 5th), Nikita Alexeev (2000: 8th), Brad Boyes (2000: 24th), Carlo Colaiacovo (2001: 17th) and Adam Munro (2001: 29th).

Connor McDavid became the only player in team history to be drafted first overall after being drafted by the Edmonton Oilers in the 2015 NHL Entry Draft on June 26, 2015.

Year Player Team Round Pick #
1997 Jason Ward Montreal Canadiens 1 11
1997 Patrick Dovigi Edmonton Oilers 2 41
1997 Adam Spylo San Jose Sharks 5 107
1998 Michael Rupp New York Islanders 1 9
1999 Tim Connolly New York Islanders 1 5
1999 Sean Dixon Montreal Canadiens 6 167
2000 Nikita Alexeev Tampa Bay Lightning 1 8
2000 Brad Boyes Toronto Maple Leafs 1 24
2000 Michael Rupp New Jersey Devils 3 76
2001 Carlo Colaiacovo Toronto Maple Leafs 1 17
2001 Adam Munro Chicago Blackhawks 1 29
2002 Brian Lee Anaheim Ducks 3 71
2002 Scott Dobben Ottawa Senators 4 113
2004 Josh Disher New Jersey Devils 6 185
2004 Chris Campoli New York Islanders 7 227
2005 Ryan O'Marra New York Islanders 1 15
2005 Mike Blunden Chicago Blackhawks 2 43
2007 Nick Palmieri New Jersey Devils 3 79
2007 Anthony Peluso St. Louis Blues 6 160
2007 Luke Gazdic Dallas Stars 6 172
2007 Zack Torquato Detroit Red Wings 6 178
2007 Josh Kidd Los Angeles Kings 7 184
2008 Mitch Gaulton New York Rangers 6 171
2009 Ryan O'Reilly Colorado Avalanche 2 33
2009 Jaroslav Janus Tampa Bay Lightning 6 162
2009 David Shields St. Louis Blues 6 168
2010 Greg McKegg Toronto Maple Leafs 3 62
2010 Andrew Yogan New York Rangers 4 100
2012 Adam Pelech New York Islanders 3 65
2012 Connor Brown Toronto Maple Leafs 6 156
2013 Andre Burakovsky Washington Capitals 1 23
2013 Connor Crisp Montreal Canadiens 3 71
2014 Kyle Pettit Vancouver Canucks 6 156
2015 Connor McDavid Edmonton Oilers 1 1
2015 Dylan Strome Arizona Coyotes 1 3
2015 Travis Dermott Toronto Maple Leafs 2 34
2016 Alex DeBrincat Chicago Blackhawks 2 39
2016 Taylor Raddysh Tampa Bay Lightning 2 58
2016 Jordan Sambrook Detroit Red Wings 5 137
2017 Ivan Lodnia Minnesota Wild 3 85

Retired numbers[edit]

Current roster[edit]

Updated September 29, 2017

Goaltenders
# Player Born Place of birth Drafted
1 Canada Daniel Murphy 2000 Guelph, Ontario Eligible 2018
40 Canada Anand Oberoi 1999 Kanata, Ontario Undrafted
Defencemen
# Player Born Place of birth Drafted
3 Canada Ryan Martin 1999 London, Ontario Undrafted
5 Canada Aidan Timmermans 1999 Toronto, Ontario Eligible 2018
20 Canada Josh Wainman 1999 Peterborough, Ontario Undrafted
34 Canada Jack Duff 2000 Kingston, Ontario Eligible 2018
41 Canada Kurtis Henry 2000 Niagara Falls, Ontario Eligible 2018
47 Canada Owen Headrick 1997 Garden River, Ontario Undrafted
49 Canada Luke Beamish 2000 Mississauga, Ontario Eligible 2018
Forwards
# Player Position Born Place of birth Drafted
7 Canada Christian Girhiny LW 1998 Thorold, Ontario Undrafted
9 Canada Kyle Maksimovich LW 1998 Hamilton, Ontario Undrafted
10 Canada Emmett Sproule C 2001 Collingwood, Ontario Eligible 2019
14 Canada Hayden Fowler C 2001 Kingston, Ontario Eligible 2019
15 Switzerland Stephane Patry C 2000 Geneva, Switzerland Eligible 2018
21 Canada Patrick Fellows LW 1997 Mississauga, Ontario Undrafted
22 United States Joseph Mack C 2000 New Hudson, Michigan Eligible 2018
27 United States Ivan Lodnia C 1999 Novi, Michigan MIN –– Round 3, 85th overall –– 2017
29 Canada Chad Yetman RW 2000 Whitby, Ontario Eligible 2018
39 Russia Gera Poddubnyi C 1999 Sarov, Russia Undrafted
77 Canada Maxim Golod LW 2000 Concord, Ontario Eligible 2018
91 Canada Troy Lajeunesse C 1997 Dokis First Nation, Ontario Undrafted
96 United States Alex Gritz LW 2000 Cranberry,[12] Pennsylvania Eligible 2018

Season-by-season results[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Legend: OTL - Overtime Loss, SL - Shootout Loss, PTS - Points, GF - Goals For, GA - Goals Against, GD - Goal Differential

Season Games Won Lost Tie OTL SL PTS PCT% GF GA GD Standing Playoffs
1996–97 66 23 36 7 - - 53 0.402 240 260 -20 5th Central Lost in Quarterfinals
1997–98 66 33 28 5 - - 71 0.538 261 252 +9 4th West Lost in Quarterfinals
1998–99 68 31 33 4 - - 66 0.485 271 297 -26 3rd Midwest Lost in Quarterfinals
1999–00 68 33 28 4 3 - 73 0.515 224 229 -5 1st Midwest Lost in Semifinals
2000–01 68 45 11 10 2 - 102 0.735 264 171 +93 1st Midwest Lost in Conference Finals
2001–02 68 41 22 4 1 - 87 0.632 246 218 +28 1st Midwest Won OHL Championship, Lost Memorial Cup
2002–03 68 24 35 6 3 - 57 0.397 181 248 -67 5th Midwest Missed Playoffs
2003–04 68 29 26 6 7 - 71 0.471 221 212 +9 5th Midwest Lost in Semifinals
2004–05 68 31 26 6 5 - 73 0.500 186 207 -21 4th Midwest Lost in Quarterfinals
2005–06 68 26 35 - 4 3 59 0.434 219 266 -47 5th Midwest Missed Playoffs
2006–07 68 15 50 - 1 2 33 0.243 209 378 -169 5th Midwest Missed Playoffs
2007–08 68 18 46 - 2 2 40 0.294 206 343 -137 5th Midwest Missed Playoffs
2008–09 68 34 29 - 3 2 73 0.537 208 254 -46 3rd Midwest Lost in Quarterfinals
2009–10 68 33 28 - 5 2 73 0.537 257 259 -2 4th Midwest Lost in Quarterfinals
2010–11 68 40 26 - 1 1 82 0.603 281 229 +52 3rd Midwest Lost in Quarterfinals
2011–12 68 10 52 - 3 3 26 0.191 169 338 -169 5th Midwest Missed Playoffs
2012–13 68 19 40 - 4 5 47 0.346 206 312 -106 5th Midwest Missed Playoffs
2013–14 68 52 14 - 2 0 106 0.779 312 170 +142 2nd Midwest Lost in Conference Finals
2014–15 68 50 14 - 2 2 104 0.765 331 212 +119 1st Midwest Lost OHL Championship
2015–16 68 52 15 - 1 0 105 0.772 269 183 +86 1st Midwest Lost in Conference Finals
2016–17 68 50 15 - 2 1 103 0.757 319 182 +137 1st Midwest Won OHL Championship, Lost Memorial Cup
2017–18 68 23 35 - 7 3 56 0.412 220 270 -50 5th Midwest Missed Playoffs

 

Playoffs[edit]

Conference Quarterfinals Conference Semifinals Conference Finals OHL Championship
Season Result Opponent Final Result Opponent Final Result Opponent Final Result Opponent Final
1996-97 > Lost Guelph Storm 4-1
1997-98 > Lost London Knights 4-3
1998-99 > Lost Guelph Storm 4-1
1999-00 > Won Brampton Battalion 4-2 > Lost Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 4-3
2000-01 > Won London Knights 4-1 > Won Brampton Battalion 4-1 > Lost Plymouth Whalers 4-1
2001-02 > Won Sarnia Sting 4-1 > Won London Knights 4-2 > Won Windsor Spitfires 4-1 > Won Barrie Colts 4-1
2002-03 Out of playoffs. Did not qualify.
2003-04 > Won Sarnia Sting 4-1 > Lost London Knights 4-0
2004-05 > Lost Kitchener Rangers 4-2
2005-06 Out of playoffs. Did not qualify.
2006-07 Out of playoffs. Did not qualify.
2007-08 Out of playoffs. Did not qualify.
2008-09 > Lost London Knights 4-1
2009-10 > Lost Windsor Spitfires 4-0
2010-11 > Lost Windsor Spitfires 4-3
2011-12 Out of playoffs. Did not qualify.
2012-13 Out of playoffs. Did not qualify.
2013-14 > Won Saginaw Spirit 4-1 > Won Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 4-0 > Lost Guelph Storm 4-1
2014-15 > Won Sarnia Sting 4-1 > Won London Knights 4-0 > Won Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 4-2 > Lost Oshawa Generals 4-1
2015-16 > Won Saginaw Spirit 4-0 > Won Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 4-1 > Lost London Knights 4-0
2016-17 > Won Sarnia Sting 4-0 > Won London Knights 4-3 > Won Owen Sound Attack 4-2 > Won Mississauga Steelheads 4-1
2017-18 Out of playoffs. Did not qualify.

 

Memorial Cup[edit]

Round Robin Game 1 Round Robin Game 2 Round Robin Game 3 Semi-Final Final
Year Result Opponent Score Result Opponent Score Result Opponent Score Result Opponent Score Result Opponent Score
2002 Lost Kootenay Ice 3-0 Won Victoriaville Tigres 5-1 Won Guelph Storm 4-0 Lost Victoriaville Tigres 5-4 OT
2017 Won Seattle Thunderbirds 4-2 Won Saint John Sea Dogs 12-5 Lost Windsor Spitfires 4-2 Won Saint John Sea Dogs 6-3 Lost Windsor Spitfires 4-3

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Otters Unveil New Color Scheme and Jersey". OttersHockey.com. Retrieved August 20, 2017.
  2. ^ "OHL Awards". Ontario Hockey League. Canadian Hockey League. Retrieved 2017-12-24.
  3. ^ "CHL Awards". chl.ca. Canadian Hockey League. Retrieved 2017-12-24.
  4. ^ "LECOM becomes official medical provider..." Otters Hockey.com. Retrieved October 6, 2012.
  5. ^ "Otters make CHL history, claim second straight Hamilton Spectator Trophy – Ontario Hockey League". ontariohockeyleague.com. Retrieved 2017-03-20.
  6. ^ "Otters rewrite the record books in 12-5 win – Mastercard Memorial Cup". mastercardmemorialcup.ca. Retrieved 2017-05-24.
  7. ^ NHL Central Scouting's 2015 final rankings, National Hockey League, April 8, 2015
  8. ^ Strang, Katie. "Highly touted prospect Connor McDavid goes No. 1 overall to Oilers". ESPN.com. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  9. ^ "Connor McDavid granted exceptional status, now eligible for OHL draft". National Post. March 21, 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-03-22.
  10. ^ Creamer, Chris. "New Otters Jersey Evokes Memories of the Blades". SportsLogos.net Blog. Retrieved 18 March 2013.
  11. ^ "Otters Unveil New Color Scheme and Jersey". OttersHockey.com. Retrieved August 20, 2017.
  12. ^ Enrietto, John (April 24, 2016). "Cranberry's Gritz selected in OHL draft". The Cranberry Eagle. Retrieved October 21, 2017.

External links[edit]