Erik M. Conway

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Erik M. Conway (born 1965) is the historian at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.[1] He is the author of several books. He previously completed a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1998, with a dissertation on the development of aircraft landing aids.[2]

In High-Speed Dreams (2005), Conway argues that U.S. government sponsorship of supersonic commercial transportation systems resulted from Cold War concerns about a loss of technological prowess in the modern world.[3][4] Realizing the Dream of Flight (2006) consists of eleven essays on individuals prepared in honor of the one hundredth anniversary of the Wright brothers' first powered flight.[5] Conway also wrote Blind Landings (2007) and he is a co-author of a secondary-level education text entitled Science and Exploration (2007). Atmospheric Science at NASA was published in 2008.[6]

His 2010 book Merchants of Doubt was co-authored with Naomi Oreskes,[7] as was his article in the Winter 2013 issue of Daedalus called The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View from the Future.[8]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Collins Literary Agency Rights Guide/March 2008
  2. ^ https://www.erikmconway.com/. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ Book review: High-Speed Dreams: NASA and the Technopolitics of Supersonic Transportation The Journal of American History, Vol. 39, No. 1, June 2006.
  4. ^ Erik M. Conway (2005). High-Speed Dreams: NASA and the Technopolitics of Supersonic Transportation Johns Hopkins University Press.
  5. ^ Realizing the Dream of Flight: Biographical Essays in Honor of the Centennial of Flight, 1903–2003 (review) Technology and Culture, Volume 48, Number 1, January 2007, pp. 232-234.
  6. ^ Erik M. Conway (2008). Atmospheric Science at NASA: a history Johns Hopkins University Press.
  7. ^ McKie, Robin. "Merchants of Doubt by Naomi Oreskes and Erik M Conway". The Guardian, August 8, 2010
  8. ^ "Some Like It Hot!" Bill McKibben May 9, 2013 New York Review of Books

External links[edit]