Erin Nayler

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Erin Nayler
Nayler playing for New Zealand in 2019
Personal information
Full name Erin Nicole Nayler[1]
Date of birth (1992-04-17) 17 April 1992 (age 31)[1]
Place of birth Auckland, New Zealand[2]
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9+12 in)[1]
Position(s) Goalkeeper
Team information
Current team
Bayern Munich
Number 23
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2010 IPFW Mastodons
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
Lynn-Avon United
Forrest Hill Milford
Eastern Suburbs AFC
2015 Norwest United AFC
2016 Sky Blue FC 0 (0)
2016–2017 Olympique Lyonnais Féminin 0 (0)
2017 Grenoble Foot 38 11 (0)
2017–2020 Bordeaux 32 (0)
2020–2021 Reading 1 (0)
2022 Umeå IK 22 (0)
2023 Norrköping 0 (0)
2023– Bayern Munich 0 (0)
International career
2010–2012 New Zealand U-20 10 (0)
2013– New Zealand 84[3] (0)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals, correct as of 17:45, 9 July 2023 (UTC)
‡ National team caps and goals, correct as of 17:45, 9 July 2023

Erin Nicole Nayler (born 17 April 1992) is a New Zealand professional association football goalkeeper, playing for Bayern Munich of the German Frauen-Bundesliga.[4] She has represented New Zealand at international level.[5]

Early life[edit]

Nayler started playing as a goalkeeper at the age of 10.[6] Playing for Westlake Girls High School with her father Mark as coach, Nayler won many Secondary School tournaments before graduating in 2009.[7] Afterwards she went to Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne in 2010,[8] spending one year playing for the IPFW Mastodons and studying biology.[9] She is currently studying Molecular Biology at Massey University.[6]

Career[edit]

Nayler was a member of the New Zealand U-20 side at the 2010 and 2012 Women's World Championships, playing in all three of New Zealand's group games at both events.[10][11] The performances earned her a spot at the senior New Zealand team, the "Football Ferns", for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.[12] Nayler was the only uncapped member of New Zealand's squad and did not feature in the tournament.[13] She was also a standby player for the 2012 Olympics.[14]

With Bordeaux in 2018.

Nayler's eventual senior début happened at the 2013 Cyprus Cup, in a 2–0 win over Italy.[15]

She played all three matches of New Zealand at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada.[16] Nayler was chosen as Player of the Match during her second game, as she kept a clean sheet in a 0–0 tie with the hosts in Edmonton.[17]

In 2015, Nayler was captain of Northern Football as they won the National Women's League, the top-flight women's football tournament of New Zealand.[18] She also played for Norwest United of the Northern League.[13] In 2016, Northern Football manager Paul Greig had become assistant coach of Sky Blue FC, in the United States' National Women's Soccer League, and led his new team to sign Nayler.[19] However, she was released by Sky Blue after 26 days and no games played, and Sky Blue signed another outfielder instead.[20][21]

Nayler then hoped to use the 2016 Olympics, where she was again the Ferns' starting goalie, to see if she attracted the attention of any foreign clubs.[22] In the Olympics, Nayler had a clean sheet in New Zealand's second game, a defeat of Colombia by 1–0, but the Ferns fell in the group stage following defeats to the United States and France.[23]

Shortly after the Games, Nayler signed a two-year contract with Olympique Lyonnais of France.[24] In 2017 she was loaned to women's team of Grenoble Foot 38, who played the Division 2, after seeing no playing time as the third goalkeeper.[25][26] For the 2017–18 season, Nayler signed with the female squad of FC Girondins de Bordeaux, who played in the Division 1.[27] At the end of her first season, where Bordeaux finished seventh, Nayler renewed her contract for an additional two years.[28]

In April 2019, Nayler was named to the final 23-player squad for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.[29]

In August 2020, Nayler announced she had signed for FA Women's Super League club Reading. Unable to dislodge the incumbent goalkeeper Grace Moloney and unhappy at a lack of playing opportunities, Nayler left after one season.[30]

On 27 October 2021, Damallsvenskan club Umeå IK announced the signing of Nayler ahead of their 2022 season, where she played during 2022.[31]

On 1 December 2022, Damallsvenskan club IFK Norrköping announced the signing of Nayler ahead of their 2023 season.[32]

Bayern Munich announced in August 2023 that Nayler had signed a one-year contract with the club.[4]

Honours[edit]

Individual

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "List of Players – 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 June 2015.
  2. ^ "Profile". NZF. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  3. ^ "Football Ferns squad revealed for World Cup". The New Zealand Herald. 29 April 2019.
  4. ^ a b "FC Bayern Women sign goalkeeper Erin Nayler". fcbayern.com. FC Bayern Munich. 31 August 2023. Retrieved 31 August 2023.
  5. ^ "Caps 'n' Goals, New Zealand Women's national representatives". The Ultimate New Zealand Soccer Website. Retrieved 10 October 2011.
  6. ^ a b "Thrill of the save fuels Nayler | New Zealand Football". Nzfootball.co.nz. 4 March 2015. Archived from the original on 10 August 2016. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  7. ^ "Westlake Girls High take out the champs". Stuff. 31 January 2009. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  8. ^ "Fort Wayne Mastodons Athletics – Women's Soccer Adds Three to 2010 Roster". Gomastodons.com. 3 February 2010. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  9. ^ "Fort Wayne Mastodons Athletics – Erin Nayler – 2010 Women's Soccer". Gomastodons.com. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  10. ^ "Squad List – New Zealand". FIFA. Archived from the original on 2 September 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2013.
  11. ^ "Squad List – New Zealand". FIFA. Archived from the original on 23 October 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013.
  12. ^ "Nayler named in World Cup squad". Auckland Football Federation. 8 June 2011. Retrieved 10 October 2011.
  13. ^ a b "Football Ferns > Player Profiles > Erin Naylor". New Zealand Football. Retrieved 10 October 2011.
  14. ^ "Oceania Football Confederation". Oceaniafootball.com. 29 June 2012. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  15. ^ "Football Ferns-Line-ups". The Ultimate New Zealand Soccer Website. Retrieved 10 October 2013.
  16. ^ "FIFA player's stats". FIFA. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 28 June 2015.
  17. ^ "Nayler: We fought hard | New Zealand Football". Nzfootball.co.nz. 12 June 2015. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  18. ^ "Northern Football halt Mainland's dominance with national women's league final win". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  19. ^ "Erin Nayler signs for Sky Blue FC". New Zealand Football. 2 May 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2016.
  20. ^ Wilson, Clay (6 July 2016). "Rio Olympics helps Football Ferns keeper Erin Nayler move on from club dumping". Stuff. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  21. ^ "Former Friar Zimmerman Signs Pro Contract". Big East Conference. 5 July 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  22. ^ "Rio Olympics helps Football Ferns keeper Erin Nayler move on from club dumping". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  23. ^ "Football Ferns' Olympic campaign over after 3–0 loss to France". Stuff. 10 August 2016.
  24. ^ "Féminines : La gardienne Erin Nayler s'engage avec l'OL pour 2 ans". www.OL.fr.
  25. ^ "A la rencontre de Erin Nayler, internationale néo-zélandaise". GF38. 15 January 2017.
  26. ^ "NZ Football – HOME". www.nzfootball.co.nz.
  27. ^ "Erin Nayler joins the Girondines!". Archived from the original on 11 October 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  28. ^ "Poignant test for Football Ferns keeper". Newsroom. 7 June 2018.
  29. ^ "Football Ferns squad revealed for World Cup". New Zealand Herald.
  30. ^ Rollo, Phillip (28 May 2021). "Football Fern looking forward to Olympics after 'horrible experience' in England". Stuff. Retrieved 8 December 2022.
  31. ^ "Landslagsmålvakten Erin Nayler klar för Umeå IK FF". umeaik.se (in Swedish). Umeå IK. 27 October 2021. Retrieved 8 November 2021.
  32. ^ "VÄLKOMMEN TILL IFK, ERIN NAYLER!".
  33. ^ "IFFHS WOMAN TEAM – OFC – OF THE DECADE 2011–2020". IFFHS. 31 January 2021.

External links[edit]