Erle Cox

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Erle Cox
Erle Cox portrait.png
Born Erle Cox
(1873-08-15)15 August 1873
Emerald Hill, Victoria, Australia
Died 20 November 1950(1950-11-20) (aged 77)
Elsternwick, Victoria, Australia
Language English
Nationality Australian
Genre science fiction
Notable works Out of the Silence

Erle Cox (15 August 1873 – 20 November 1950) was an Australian journalist and science fiction writer.

Life[edit]

Cox was born at Emerald Hill, Victoria, on 15 August 1873, the second son of Ross Cox, who had emigrated from his native Dublin as a youth during the early gold rush days of the 1850s. He was educated at Castlemaine Grammar School and Melbourne Grammar School. Following school, Cox worked as a wine-grower near Rutherglen, Victoria, before moving to Tasmania. On 24 December 1901 he married Mary Ellen Kilborn and some time later the couple settled in Melbourne.[1]

In 1921, Cox joined the editorial staff of The Argus newspaper as a writer of special articles and book reviewer; later he was the principal movie critic. In 1946 he joined the staff of The Age after being given notice from The Argus.[1]

Cox died in 1950 after a long illness.

Works[edit]

Three early works were published in the Lone Hand Magazine: Reprieve, Diplomacy and The Social Code.

  • Out of the Silence, his best known novel, is set in Australia, and involves the discovery of a gigantic, buried sphere, containing the accumulated knowledge of a past civilization. It was published by The Argus in weekly instalments over a six-month period in 1919. The first Australian edition in book form was published by Vidler, in 1925. The same year a British edition appeared (Hamilton), and in 1928 an American edition (Rae D. Henkle). In 1934, the book was adapted to a comic-strip format by an artist identified only as Hix, likely Reginald Ernest Hicks.[2] This pictorial version was published daily in The Argus in 120 episodes from August to December. In the same year, the novel was dramatised for radio presentation as a 25-part serial. The SF Encyclopedia notes that: "The novel exhibits some racist overtones"[3] in reference to the eugenically-inspired character Odi who brought about the supremacy of the white race by devising a ray that killed only black people. The device of a buried sphere from a lost, advanced civilization may seem to have influenced René Barjavel's 1968 science fiction novel La Nuit des temps, translated into English as The Ice People.
  • Fools Harvest was published as a fourteen-part serial in The Argus, in 1938, and was published in book form the following year by Robertson Mullen with two extra chapters.
  • The Missing Angel, the third and final book by Cox, was published by Robertson Mullen in 1947.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]