Ernest Maragall

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Ernest Maragall
Foto d'Ernest Maragall i Mira a un carrer de Barcelona.jpg
Maragall in 2019
Minister of Foreign Action, Institutional Relations and Transparency
In office
2 June 2018 – 22 November 2018
PresidentQuim Torra
Preceded byRaül Romeva
(Direct rule from 27 October 2017)
Succeeded byAlfred Bosch
Minister of Education
In office
29 November 2006 – 29 November 2010
PresidentJosé Montilla
Preceded byJoan Manuel del Pozo i Àlvarez
Succeeded byIrene Rigau
Member of the European Parliament
for Spain
In office
1 July 2014 – 30 December 2016
Succeeded byJordi Solé i Ferrando
Member of the Catalan Parliament
for the Province of Barcelona
In office
9 December 2003 – 9 January 2004
Succeeded byBernardo Fernández Martínez
In office
22 November 2006 – 1 December 2006
Succeeded byJordi Terrades i Santacreu
In office
17 December 2010 – 2 October 2012
Assumed office
17 January 2018
Member of Barcelona City Council
In office
1995–2004
Succeeded byMontserrat Ballarín Espuña
Personal details
Born
Ernest Maragall i Mira

(1943-01-05) 5 January 1943 (age 79)
Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
Political partyRepublican Left of Catalonia
Other political
affiliations
Republican Left of Catalonia–Catalonia Yes

Ernest Maragall i Mira (born 5 January 1943, in Barcelona) is a Spanish economist, politician, member of the Parliament of Catalonia and former Minister of Foreign Action, Institutional Relations and Transparency of Catalonia. He was previously Minister of Education, a member of the European Parliament and a member of Barcelona City Council (BCC).

Born in 1943 in Barcelona, Maragall joined the anti-fascist Workers' Front of Catalonia as a youth. He worked in advertising and marketing before holding several positions in BCC. A socialist, Maragall was one of the founders of the Socialist Convergence of Catalonia and its successors, the Socialist Party of Catalonia–Congress and Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC). He left the PSC in 2012 due to its opposition to Catalan independence and founded the pro-independence New Catalan Left which later merged with others to form the Left Movement. He is currently a member of the Republican Left of Catalonia.

Maragall was a member of BCC from 1995 to 2004 and held several senior positions in the socialist administration, including that of his brother Pasqual who was Mayor of Barcelona till 1997. He was elected to the Parliament of Catalonia in November 2003 but resigned upon being appointed secretary of the regional government presided by his brother Pasqual. He was re-elected to the Catalan Parliament in November 2006 but resigned again upon being appointed Minister of Education in the regional government presided by José Montilla. He was re-elected in November 2010 but the socialists lost power to the Convergence and Union and Maragall lost his ministerial post.

Maragall was a member of the European Parliament from July 2014 to December 2016 and in December 2017 he was re-elected to the Catalan Parliament. In June 2018 he became Minister of Foreign Action, Institutional Relations and Transparency.

Early life and family[edit]

Maragall was born on 5 January 1943 in Barcelona, Catalonia.[1] He is the grandson of poet Joan Maragall, son of senator Jordi Maragall i Noble and brother of Pasqual Maragall, President of Catalonia and Mayor of Barcelona.[1][2][3] He was educated at Virtene School and was a member of the Agrupament Escolta de la Confraria.[1][4] He was a member of the Workers' Front of Catalonia, an underground resistance movement against the fascist dictatorship of Francisco Franco, from its foundation in 1961.[1][5]

Career[edit]

Maragall worked in advertising and marketing from 1958 and 1970.[1][5] He then held several positions at Barcelona City Council: computer analyst (1970–79); economist at the Technical Project Office; manager of the Institut Cartogràfic de Barcelona S.A.; and director-general of the Municipal Institute of Information Technology.[1][5]

Politics[edit]

Maragall was one of the founders of the Socialist Convergence of Catalonia (CSC) in 1974.[1][5][6] The CSC merged with other groups in 1976 to form the Socialist Party of Catalonia–Congress (PSC–C), a forerunner to the Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC).[1][5] He was a member of the executive committee of the Barcelona branch of the PSC from 1977 to 2012.[1][6]

Local politics[edit]

Maragall contested the 1995 local elections as a PSC candidate in Barcelona and was elected.[7] He was re-elected at the 1999 and 2003 local elections.[8][9][10][11]

Maragall was councillor of Finance and Public Function (1995–99) and Presidency and Finance (1999-04).[6][12] He was spokesperson for the city government led by mayor Joan Clos from July from 2001 to June 2003.[1][5] He was president of the District Council of Sant Andreu, Municipal Institute of Informatics and Municipal Institute of Finance, and vice-president of Municipal Institute of Education.[6][12] He was the city council's representative in the Federation of Municipalities of Catalonia, vice-president of the Spanish Federation of Municipalities and Provinces' Public Function Commission and vice-president of the Board of Directors of Localret.[6][12]

Regional politics[edit]

Maragall with President José Montilla in May 2008

Maragall contested the 2003 regional election as a Socialists' Party of Catalonia-Citizens for Change (PSC–CpC) electoral alliance candidate in the Province of Barcelona and was elected to the Parliament of Catalonia.[13][14] He resigned from parliament in January 2004.[15] He was secretary of the regional government presided by his brother Pasqual from December 2003 to September 2006.[5][6]

Maragall contested the 2006 regional election as a PSC–CpC electoral alliance candidate in the Province of Barcelona and was re-elected.[16][17] He resigned from parliament in December 2006.[18] He was Minister of Education from November 2006 to November 2010 in the regional government led by José Montilla.[19][20]

Maragall and other members of the Catalan government on 2 June 2018

Maragall contested the 2010 regional election as a PSC candidate in the Province of Barcelona and was re-elected.[21][22] Maragall supported Catalan independence but the PSC's leadership opposed this and eventually Maragall and others left the party in October 2012 to form the pro-independence New Catalan Left (NECat).[1][23] He contested the 2014 European elections as The Left for the Right to Decide (EPDD) electoral alliance candidate and was elected to the European Parliament.[24][25] NECat merged with Moviment Catalunya to form the Left Movement (MES) in November 2014.[26] In December 2016, half-way through his term, Maragall resigned from the European Parliament to allow Jordi Solé i Ferrando to become an MEP.[27][28]

Maragall contested the 2017 regional election as a Republican Left of Catalonia–Catalonia Yes electoral alliance candidate in the Province of Barcelona and was elected.[29][30][31] At the election Catalan secessionists retained a slim majority in the Catalan Parliament.[32][33] Maragall was touted as a candidate for President of Catalonia.[34] In May 2018 Maragall announced that he had joined the Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC).[35]

On 19 May 2018 newly elected President Quim Torra nominated a new government in which Maragall was to be Minister of Foreign Action, Institutional Relations and Transparency.[36][37][38] He was sworn in on 2 June 2018 at the Palau de la Generalitat de Catalunya.[39][40][41]

Electoral history[edit]

Electoral history of Ernest Maragall
Election Constituency Party Alliance No. Result
1995 local[7] Barcelona Socialists' Party of Catalonia 15 Elected
1999 local[8][9] Barcelona Socialists' Party of Catalonia Socialists' Party of Catalonia-Municipal Progress of Catalonia 7 Elected
2003 local[10][11] Barcelona Socialists' Party of Catalonia Socialists' Party of Catalonia-Municipal Progress of Catalonia 4 Elected
2003 regional[13][14] Province of Barcelona Socialists' Party of Catalonia Socialists' Party of Catalonia-Citizens for Change 8 Elected
2006 regional[16][17] Province of Barcelona Socialists' Party of Catalonia Socialists' Party of Catalonia-Citizens for Change 6 Elected
2010 regional[21][22] Province of Barcelona Socialists' Party of Catalonia 7 Elected
2014 European[24][25] Spain New Catalan Left The Left for the Right to Decide 2 Elected
2017 regional[29][30] Province of Barcelona Left Movement Republican Left of Catalonia–Catalonia Yes 13 Elected

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Ernest Maragall, trajectòria i rigor per projectar Catalunya al món" (in Catalan). Barcelona, Spain: Republican Left of Catalonia. 19 May 2018. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  2. ^ "Biografia del conseller d'Educació, Ernest Maragall". VilaWeb (in Catalan). Europa Press. 28 November 2006. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  3. ^ "Prominent Socialist leader Ernest Maragall to run with the Left-Wing Catalan Independence Party (ERC)". Catalan News Agency. Barcelona, Spain. 4 March 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  4. ^ Vila, Enric (11 February 2018). "Ernest Maragall, el germà discret". El Nacional (in Catalan). Barcelona, Spain. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Ernest Maragall, de conseller socialista del tripartito a Acción Exterior con ERC". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). Barcelona, Spain. Europa Press. 19 May 2018. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Ribera, Xavier (28 May 2014). "Ernest Maragall, del 'seny' a la 'rauxa'". eldiario.es (in Spanish). Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  7. ^ a b "Consulta de Resultados Electorales: Municipales / Mayo 1995 – Mun. Barcelona" (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain: Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Administració Electoral: Junta Electoral de Zona de Barcelona". Butlletí Oficial de la Província de Barcelona (in Catalan). Vol. LXI, no. 113. Barcelona, Spain: Diputació de Barcelona. 12 May 1999. p. 25. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  9. ^ a b "Consulta de Resultados Electorales: Municipales / Junio 1999 – Mun. Barcelona" (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain: Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  10. ^ a b "Administració Electoral: Junta Electoral de Zona de Barcelona". Butlletí Oficial de la Província de Barcelona (in Catalan). Vol. LXI, no. 102. Barcelona, Spain: Diputació de Barcelona. 29 April 2003. p. 25. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  11. ^ a b "Consulta de Resultados Electorales: Municipales / Mayo 2003 – Mun. Barcelona" (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain: Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  12. ^ a b c "Ernest Maragall" (in Catalan). Barcelona, Spain: Republican Left of Catalonia. 19 May 2018. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  13. ^ a b "Administració de Justícia: Juntes Electorals". Diari Oficial de la Generalitat de Catalunya (in Catalan). No. 3988. Barcelona, Spain: Generalitat de Catalunya. 15 October 2003. p. 19857. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  14. ^ a b "Eleccions al Parlament de Catalunya 2003: Candidats electes" (PDF) (in Catalan). Departament de Governació, Administracions Públiques i Habitatge, Generalitat de Catalunya. p. 1. Retrieved 7 June 2018.
  15. ^ "BOPC 006/07: Tramitacions generals" (PDF). Butlletí Oficial del Parlament de Catalunya. Vol. VII, no. 6. Parliament of Catalonia. 14 January 2004. p. 4. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  16. ^ a b "Administració de Justícia: Juntes Electorals". Diari Oficial de la Generalitat de Catalunya (in Catalan). No. 4730. Barcelona, Spain: Generalitat de Catalunya. 30 September 2006. p. 40764. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  17. ^ a b "Eleccions al Parlament de Catalunya 2006: Candidats electes" (PDF) (in Catalan). Departament de Governació, Administracions Públiques i Habitatge, Generalitat de Catalunya. p. 1. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  18. ^ "BOPC 006/08: Tramitacions generals" (PDF). Butlletí Oficial del Parlament de Catalunya. Vol. VIII, no. 6. Parliament of Catalonia. 11 December 2006. p. 63. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  19. ^ "Hoy juran su cargo los consellers del Gobierno de Montilla". 20 minutos (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain. 29 November 2006. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  20. ^ "Montilla coloca a Ernest Maragall en Educación y a Montserrat Tura en Justicia". El Mundo (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain. 28 November 2006. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  21. ^ a b "Administració de Justícia: Administració Electoral". Diari Oficial de la Generalitat de Catalunya (in Catalan). No. 5746. Barcelona, Spain: Generalitat de Catalunya. 2 November 2010. p. 80077. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  22. ^ a b "Eleccions al Parlament de Catalunya 2010: Candidats electes" (PDF) (in Catalan). Departament de Governació, Administracions Públiques i Habitatge, Generalitat de Catalunya. p. 1. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  23. ^ Tugas, R.; González, S. (11 October 2012). "Ernest Maragall deixa el PSC i crea Nova Esquerra Catalana". Ara (in Catalan). Barcelona, Spain. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  24. ^ a b "Otras Disposiciones: Juntas Electorales Provinciales" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). No. 104. Madrid, Spain: Government of Spain. 29 April 2014. p. 33421. Retrieved 12 June 2018.
  25. ^ a b "Consulta de Resultados Electorales: Municipales / Parlament Europeo Junio 2009 – Candidatos Electos" (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain: Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  26. ^ "Els crítics del PSC, el partit d'Ernest Maragall i Moviment Catalunya presenten MES, un nou partit d'esquerres". Corporació Catalana de Mitjans Audiovisuals (in Catalan). Barcelona, Spain. 30 November 2014.
  27. ^ Solé, Albert; Moldes, Aleix (2 January 2017). "Jordi Solé: "Treballem per tenir la complicitat dels estats per a quan la necessitem"". Ara (in Catalan). Barcelona, Spain. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  28. ^ Arredondo, Joan Carles (3 January 2017). "L'alcalde de Caldes, Jordi Solé, pren possessió com a eurodiputat". El 9 Nou (in Catalan). Granollers, Spain. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  29. ^ a b "Otras Disposiciones: Juntas Electorales Provinciales – Junta Electoral de Barcelona" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). No. 281. Madrid, Spain: Government of Spain. 19 November 2017. p. 111420. Retrieved 10 June 2018.
  30. ^ a b "Eleccions al Parlament de Catalunya 2017: Composició del Parlament" (in Catalan). Generalitat de Catalunya. Archived from the original on 22 December 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2018.
  31. ^ "Los 135 diputados del Parlament de Catalunya tras el 21-D". La Vanguardia (in Catalan). Barcelona, Spain. 22 December 2017. Retrieved 11 May 2018.
  32. ^ Jackson, Russell (22 December 2017). "Catalan independence supporters win majority in election". The Scotsman. Edinburgh, U.K. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  33. ^ Parra, Aritz; Giles, Ciaran (21 December 2017). "Catalan secessionist parties win slim majority in regional parliament". Toronto Star. Toronto, Canada. Associated Press. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  34. ^ "Ernest Maragall, possible candidat a President de la Generalitat". Catalunya Diari (in Catalan). Reus, Spain. 29 March 2018. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  35. ^ "Ernest Maragall anuncia en un article publicat a l'ARA que es fa militant d'ERC". Ara (in Catalan). Barcelona, Spain. 1 May 2018. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  36. ^ "Torra nominates new government including jailed and exiled officials". Catalan News Agency. Barcelona, Spain. 19 May 2018. Retrieved 19 May 2018.
  37. ^ "Torra nombra en su Govern a Aragonès, Artadi, Turull, Rull, Comín, Puig y Maragall". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). Barcelona, Spain. 19 May 2018. Retrieved 19 May 2018.
  38. ^ Puente, Arturo (19 May 2018). "Torra nombra a los encarcelados Turull y Rull consellers de su nuevo Govern". eldiario.es (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain. Retrieved 19 May 2018.
  39. ^ "Catalan government takes office in emotional event, lifting direct rule". Catalan News Agency. Barcelona, Spain. 2 June 2018. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  40. ^ Villalonga, Carles (2 June 2018). "El nuevo Govern de Torra toma posesión en un acto reivindicativo y escenifica el fin del 155". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). Barcelona, Spain. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  41. ^ "Los consellers toman posesión y prometen "lealtad" a Quim Torra". eldiario.es (in Spanish). Europa Press. 2 June 2018. Retrieved 3 June 2018.

External links[edit]