Esbon, Kansas

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Esbon, Kansas
City
Location within Jewell County and Kansas
Location within Jewell County and Kansas
KDOT map of Jewell County (legend)
KDOT map of Jewell County (legend)
Coordinates: 39°49′22″N 98°26′2″W / 39.82278°N 98.43389°W / 39.82278; -98.43389Coordinates: 39°49′22″N 98°26′2″W / 39.82278°N 98.43389°W / 39.82278; -98.43389
Country United States
State Kansas
County Jewell
Area[1]
 • Total 0.31 sq mi (0.80 km2)
 • Land 0.31 sq mi (0.80 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,844 ft (562 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 99
 • Estimate (2015)[3] 96
 • Density 320/sq mi (120/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 66941
Area code 785
FIPS code 20-21600 [4]
GNIS feature ID 0471981 [5]
Website City Website

Esbon is a city in Jewell County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 99.[6]

History[edit]

Esbon was laid out in 1873.[7] It was incorporated as a city in 1904.[8]

The first post office in Esbon was established in January 1874.[9]

Esbon was a shipping point on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad.[8]

Geography[edit]

Esbon is located at 39°49′22″N 98°26′2″W / 39.82278°N 98.43389°W / 39.82278; -98.43389 (39.822656, -98.433762).[10] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.31 square miles (0.80 km2), all of it land.[1]

The town lies 2.5 miles north of U.S. Route 36, and 13 miles west of Mankato, the county seat of Jewell County.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 347
1920 375 8.1%
1930 319 −14.9%
1940 292 −8.5%
1950 278 −4.8%
1960 237 −14.7%
1970 206 −13.1%
1980 234 13.6%
1990 167 −28.6%
2000 148 −11.4%
2010 99 −33.1%
Est. 2015 96 [3] −3.0%
U.S. Decennial Census

The town has a Roman Catholic church, Sacred Heart, and also has a United Methodist Church.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 99 people, 52 households, and 24 families residing in the city. The population density was 319.4 inhabitants per square mile (123.3/km2). There were 84 housing units at an average density of 271.0 per square mile (104.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.9% White, 1.0% African American, 3.0% Native American, and 4.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.0% of the population.

There were 52 households of which 19.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.5% were married couples living together, 1.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 53.8% were non-families. 48.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.90 and the average family size was 2.67.

The median age in the city was 52.3 years. 19.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 18.2% were from 25 to 44; 28.4% were from 45 to 64; and 30.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 54.5% male and 45.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 148 people, 71 households, and 37 families residing in the city. The population density was 484.8 people per square mile (184.3/km²). There were 87 housing units at an average density of 285.0 per square mile (108.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.62% White and 3.38% Native American.

There were 71 households out of which 19.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.5% were non-families. 45.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 23.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city, the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 26.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 87.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $26,875, and the median income for a family was $34,167. Males had a median income of $24,688 versus $13,125 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,438. There were none of the families and 6.7% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 16.7% of those over 64.

Economy[edit]

The primary business enterprise of the town is a grain elevator at the north end of Grand Avenue. Farming is the principal occupation in the area around Esbon.

Education[edit]

Esbon is served by USD 107 Rock Hills. Esbon became a part of Rock Hills USD 107 located in Mankato in 2006. The Rock Hills High School mascot is Grizzlies.[11]

Esbon had an elementary school and high school until 1983.[12] The Esbon High School mascot was Esbon Tigers.[13]

The Esbon Tigers won the Kansas State High School boys class B Track & Field championship in 1947.[14]

School unification consolidated Esbon and Burr Oak schools forming White Rock schools in 1983. Esbon was home of White Rock Middle school located at 203 Grand Ave.[12] The White Rock elementary school and high school were located in Burr Oak. White Rock High School's mascot was the Eagles.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ a b "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  7. ^ Kansas State Historical Society (1916). Biennial Report of the Board of Directors of the Kansas State Historical Society. Kansas State Printing Plant. p. 211. 
  8. ^ a b Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc. Standard Publishing Company. p. 597. 
  9. ^ "Kansas Post Offices, 1828-1961". Kansas Historical Society. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  11. ^ "Rock Hills". USD 107. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  12. ^ a b EducationBug.org "Jewell County, Kansas Public Schools". Retrieved on 2008-02-14.
  13. ^ "Jamestown Set To Pickup The Marbles In PTL ", The Belleville Telescope, 8 December 1977, p.5.
  14. ^ "Track & Field". KSHSAA. Retrieved 6 January 2017. 
  15. ^ "Panthers, Cougars to Excel in PTL", The Salina Journal, 4 September 1983, p.81.

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps