Escuminac, New Brunswick

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Escuminac is located in New Brunswick
Escuminac
Escuminac
Location of Escuminac in New Brunswick

Coordinates: 47°05′06″N 64°55′01″W / 47.085083°N 64.916839°W / 47.085083; -64.916839 Escuminac (2011 population: 212)[1] is a rural community in Northumberland County, New Brunswick, Canada.

Lighthouse at Point Escuminac, Miramichi Bay, New Brunswick

Located on the south shore of Miramichi Bay, the community is several kilometres west of Point Escuminac, the southeastern limit of the bay. Canada's largest inshore fishing vessel harbour is home to the local fishing fleet. Industries include two fish processing & freezing plants[2] and a boat building facility. One of Canada's important herring spawning grounds is located beside Point Escuminac.[3]

According to Joseph-Étienne Guinard a missionary and Cree language specialist with some experience with the Mi'kmaq, he believed the word meaning "here are small fruits".[4] This perfectly describes the area as berries proliferate en masse in this low-lying flat area, and the first colonist were amazed at the amount of Ericaceae.[5][6][7]

Peat bogs and rare peat cliffs are situated in the vicinity of Point Escuminac, approximately 5 kilometers east of the village.[8]

History[edit]

Escuminac was originally an Irish and English settlement of six families, but outward emigration and the prevalence of French speakers in the immediate area has changed its composition somewhat.[9] A small two-room English school was closed in 1979.

Escuminac Wharf, Miramichi Bay, New Brunswick (IR Walker 1976)

Escuminac and surrounding fishing villages, especially Baie Ste. Anne, Hardwicke and Bay du Vin were the site of a tragedy on June 19 and June 20, 1959, when a sudden storm caused a loss of 35 fishermen of the area. It is called the Escuminac Disaster. A monument by Claude Rousselle commemorating the tragedy sits at the head of the harbour.[10][11]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statistics Canada Census Profile". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2016-09-04. 
  2. ^ "Building destroyed, fuel tank saved in Escuminac wharf fire". www.cbc.ca. Retrieved 2016-03-08. 
  3. ^ Calhoun, Sue (1991-01-01). A Word to Say: The Story of the Maritime Fishermen's Union. Nimbus Pub. ISBN 9780921054641. 
  4. ^ "Escuminac (Municipalité)" (in French). Commission de toponymie du Québec. Retrieved 2012-01-04. 
  5. ^ Branch, Canada Meteorological (1904-01-01). Report. J. de L. Taché, printer to the King. 
  6. ^ Fowler, Thomas (1832-01-01). The Journal of a Tour Through British America to the Falls of Niagara: Containing an Account of the Cities, Towns, and Villages Along the Route, with a Description of the Country, and of the Manners and Customs of the Inhabitants, &c. &c. Written During the Summer of 1831. L. Smith. 
  7. ^ Reports and Maps of Investigations and Surveys. Dawson Bros. 1889-01-01. 
  8. ^ Canada, Geological Survey of (1889-01-01). Annual Report. The Survey. 
  9. ^ Fowler, Thomas (1832-01-01). The Journal of a Tour Through British America to the Falls of Niagara: Containing an Account of the Cities, Towns, and Villages Along the Route, with a Description of the Country, and of the Manners and Customs of the Inhabitants, &c. &c. Written During the Summer of 1831. L. Smith. 
  10. ^ Hamilton, William Baillie (1996-01-01). Place Names of Atlantic Canada. University of Toronto Press. ISBN 9780802075703. 
  11. ^ Samuel, Alan (1998-11-01). Treasures Of Canada. Dundurn. ISBN 9781459711242. 
Escuminac Disaster Memorial at Escuminac, Miramichi Bay, New Brunswick