Estádio General Severiano

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Estádio General Severiano
Location Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Owner Botafogo
Capacity 20,000
Construction
Built 1912
Opened May 13, 1913
Renovated 1938
Demolished 1977
Architect Rafael Galvão
Tenants
Botafogo

Estádio General Severiano was a football stadium located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.[1] It was the home stadium of Botafogo and it had a maximum capacity of 20,000 people.[1]

History[edit]

The stadium was built in 1912,[2] It was inaugurated on May 13, 1913, when Botafogo beat Flamengo 1–0.[2]

After a reformation led by architect Rafael Galvão that lasted ten years,[3] Estádio General Severiano was reinaugurated on August 28, 1938, when Botafogo beat Fluminense 3–2.[4] The stadium was closed in the 1970s,[2] under Charles Borer's term as president,[5] after Botafogo's headquarters, where the stadium was located in, where sold to Companhia Vale do Rio Doce.[6] Estádio General Severiano was demolished in 1977.[1]

CT João Saldanha[edit]

CT João Saldanha.

A training ground named Centro de Treinamento João Saldanha was inaugurated on March 29, 2004, in the same place where Estádio General Severiano was located in.[7] The training ground name honors João Saldanha, who was a supporter of Botafogo, and was a former head coach and chairman of the club.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "General Severiano" (in Portuguese). Templos do Futebol. Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c "Estádio: General Severiano" (in Portuguese). Flapédia. May 24, 2008. Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Botafogo de Futebol e Regatas" (in Portuguese). Futebol na Rede. Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Todos os presidentes do Botafogo" (in Portuguese). Botafogo de Futebol e Regatas official website. Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Datas" (in Portuguese). Veja. September 5, 2001. Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  6. ^ "A estrela eternizada por Mané" (in Portuguese). Pelé.net. Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  7. ^ "Botafogo inaugura novo centro de treinamento" (in Portuguese). Terra. March 29, 2004. Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  8. ^ Coimbra, Bernardo (March 29, 2004). "CT homenageia João Saldanha" (in Portuguese). Pelé.net. Retrieved June 24, 2009.