Estadio Gran Parque Central

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Gran Parque Central Stadium
Estadio Gran Parque Central
El Parque[1] el Templo Tricolor,[2] El primer estadio mundialista[3]
Venue of the 1930 FIFA World Cup
Logo Gran Parque Central.png
Eliminatorias Uruguay-Colombia 2021.jpg
LocationMontevideo, Uruguay
OwnerClub Nacional de Football
Capacity34,000[5]
Field size105 x 68 m
SurfaceGrass
Construction
Built1898-99
Opened25 May 1900[4]
Renovated1911, 1944, 1974, 2005
Tenants
Club Nacional de Football (1900–present)
Website
nacional.uy/granparquecentral

The Estadio Gran Parque Central is the stadium of Club Nacional de Football. It is located in Montevideo, Uruguay, near Nacional headquarters (exactly between the streets Carlos Anaya, Jaime Cibils, General Urquiza and Comandante Braga), in the La Blanqueada neighbourhood.

Due to various factors, it is considered a historical stadium.[6][7][8] Built in 1900, it is the oldest current stadium in America and the fifteenth in the world.[9][10] But it mainly stands out for having hosted the 1930 FIFA World Cup, playing one of the first two matches in the history of the competition, when on 13 July 1930 United States defeated Belgium 3–0 in Group D. FIFA remembered this fact when in 2005 a delegation headed by its president, Joseph Blatter,[11] came to visit the reforms and placed a commemorative plaque at the stadium. This historical fact was remembered by FIFA on two occasions: 1987 and 2005.[12]

In addition, the stadium was also the venue for the Uruguayan national team, both in soccer and in other disciplines. Since its creation and until 1930, it was the main sports arena in Uruguay,[13] so until the inauguration of the Centenario Stadium, the Uruguayan team officiated as a local in the Gran Parque Central. t was also the venue for other important international tournaments, like the 1923 and 1924 South American Championships (current Copa América), the 2015 South American U-20 Championship or the 2021 Women's Copa Libertadores final.

Together with the Centenario Stadium, it is the Uruguayan stadium with the best artificial light, after a reform carried out in 2021.[14] It is also, after the Centenario, the stadium in which the Uruguayan soccer team has played more official matches. In addition, on 31 October 2018, it was the stadium to register the highest ticket sales for a stadium in Uruguay without being the Centenario, selling the 34,000 tickets available.

Since the end of 2012, Nacional promotes the inclusion of the Gran Parque Central as the second stadium of the Montevideo headquarters for Uruguay's candidacy with a view to the realization of a world future in 2030.[15] The argument that will be presented for FIFA to approve the tricolor request It will be the history of the sports scene as the first World Cup stadium.[16][17][18]

History[edit]

The Estadio Gran Parque Central is an important landmark in the history of Uruguay, not only because of its relevance in sports, but also for its bonds with the rich history of Uruguayans and their patriotic feelings.

Before the existence of Parque Central as a sports ground, in exactly the same location (which used to be known as "Quinta de la Paraguaya"), Uruguay's national hero José Artigas was named Jefe de los Orientales (leader of the Uruguayan people) in 1811.

The beginnings[edit]

In its beginnings, the Gran Parque Central stadium had wooden grandstands.

The Parque Central was opened for the practice of sports in 1900, having been the site of Montevideo's bullring until the abolition of this activity. At first, the tenants of the stadium were Deutscher Fussball Klub for their home games at the first Uruguayan league championship in the 1900s. As a sports stadium, the Parque Central was inaugurated on March 25, 1900 with a match between the Deutscher Fussball Klub and the CURCC (Central Uruguay Railway Cricket Club). The final score was CURCC 2 – Deutscher 0. Before the game, a lunch was served at Hotel Lanata, among personalities from the Government and leaders of the clubs. According to some chronicles from that period, the inauguration included the Don Bosco Band and the "Flora" gunship Band. There was also a special highlight with a Scottish skirt dancer who took the 7,000 people present by surprise, as they were unaware of the Scottish traditions. Two days after Nacional would meet the Deutscher F. K. in a game that ended 1–1.

The land was the property of "Tranvias a la Union y Maroñas", a German streetcar company whose employees were the founders of the Deutscher F. K. The venue consisted of four tennis courts and two football fields. By 1901,the streetcar company conceded Nacional the second field as they entered the AUF league. From that year until now, the Estadio Gran Parque Central has witnessed several championships won by Nacional (the last one in 2010/2011 season) and Uruguay national football team.

Many parts of the stadium remain unchanged since 1900, like the old "Mirador" located behind the Tribuna Atilio García stand, although the current pitch is different from the one of the beginning of the past century. The current orientation is east-west, opposite to the first one that was north-south, and there was another field in the actual place of the east stands and eastern part of the pitch.

Until 1930, the Parque Central was the main sports venue in Uruguay. It was only with the building of the Estadio Centenario that Nacional's stadium was superseded.

Time of modernization[edit]

Present situation of Parque Central stadium.

The 2003 reform allowed its reopening in 2005. In this year, through the efforts of Nacional fans and the sale of modern, special seats in the Tribuna José María Delgado stand, the Estadio Gran Parque Central was remodelled once again. The aim of this remodelling was to meet international football standards, which would allow Nacional to play home games for the Uruguayan Championship and the Copa Libertadores at its historic stadium. Over the years, the stadium began to be expanded, going from 20,000 people to a capacity of 34,000 spectators, constantly growing. This increase in capacity is accompanied by works to modernize its facilities, which allowed the team to no longer have to leave the tricolor stage for any kind of event.

These changes allowed the Gran Parque Central to host the 2015 South American Under-20 tournament, the 2021 Women's Copa Libertadores final and other events, both sporting and musical. In turn, in recent years it was requested as a training ground for different teams and international teams.[19][20][21]

Together with the Centenario Stadium, it is the Uruguayan stadium with the best artificial light, with lighting of 1,500 lux, after a renovation carried out in 2021.[22] In addition, in 2022, the stadium installed a modern giant screen 15.8 meters long by 5.2 meters high, being the screen with the largest inch in the entire country.[23]

The present capacity is 34.000, but in following years it is expected to expand to 40.000 (this extension would help in the intention of Nacional to include it as a venue of the future FIFA World Cup in 2030).

Remodellings[edit]

Partido Nacional vs Montevideo City Torque v01.jpg Tribuna principal GPC 2021.jpg Nacional en el GPC 2022.jpg

Burnt almost completely after the fire of 1911,it was rebuilt a couple of years later. The second remodelling of the Estadio Gran Parque Central took place in 1944. On that occasion, improvements of the pitch and the four stands were made, and more seats were added in the main stand, Tribuna José María Delgado.

Thirty years later, the Parque Central was remodelled once again due to a fire that destroyed part of the stadium.

Acknowledgements[edit]

Some acknowledgments to the Gran Parque Central Stadium

The Gran Parque Central stadium is commonly called by the Tricolor supporters as the first World Cup stadium. In this regard, the Tricolor Temple has received several awards, like a plaque placed by FIFA in 2005 commemorating the celebration in this stadium of the first match in the history of the FIFA World Cups.

For the occasion, a FIFA delegation came to visit the works, led by its president, JOseph Blatter, with Eugenio Figueredo, Nicolás Leoz, Ricardo Texeira and Julio Grondona.[24][25]

Years later, another FIFA delegation, headed by its president Gianni Infantino, visited the Gran Parque Central stadium, emphasizing that "it is a World Cup Stadium, pure history"[26] and that "when you are in such a historic place it is a very emotional strong".[27]

«The Gran Parque Central stadium, home of the National Football Club and historical heritage of world football. Why? The first match in the history of the FIFA World Cup was played there (...) "It is a great pride to be present here with our entire entourage. Uruguay has written a golden page in the history of football"» (Joseph S. Blatter)
FIFA Official Website, in 2005.[28]

«The Central Park is the history of football. It's the first stadium, the first World Cup, the first game... so he's the true football legend, it's very impressive (...) When you're in such a historic place, it's a very strong emotion».
Gianni Infantino, president of FIFA, in 2016.[29]

«It's wonderful... just thinking that the first match of the first World Cup was played here, is something to go down in history and a satisfaction for us to be here».
Fernando Hierro, ex footballer, in 2016.[30]

«It is a stadium with a lot of history (...) This is, perhaps, the most important in the world in the football history».
Fernando Niembro, journalist at ESPN, in 2022.[31]

Major international tournaments[edit]

The Gran Parque Central stadium hosted several international sporting events. Regarding competitions with national teams, the Nacional stadium hosted some tournaments, highlighting the 1923 South American Championship, the 1924 South American Championship, the 1930 FIFA World Cup or the 2015 U20 South American Championship. In the case of the Championships South American (currently known as Copa América), the Gran Parque Central was the only venue, while in the 1930 World Cup and in the 2015 South American it hosted some matches. During the 1930 World Cup, teams such as Argentina[32] and Brazil[33] made their World Cup debuts at this stadium.

This stadium was the headquarters of the Uruguayan national team, both in soccer and in other sports. Until 1930 it was the main sports arena in Uruguay, recently surpassed by the Estadio Centenario, so until the inauguration of the Estadio Centenario, Parque Central was the stadium where Uruguay played its home games.[34] In recent years, the Uruguayan rugby team played some matches here too. It is also common for foreign teams to opt for this stadium as a training camp prior to international matches.[35]

The Uruguayan national football team has never lost a game in international tournaments in the Gran parque Central stadium.

1923 Copa América[edit]

During the 1923 Copa América, the stadium hosted all the matches:

29 October 1923 Argentina  4–3  Paraguay Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Saruppo 18'
Aguirre 58', 77', 86'
Rivas 10'
Zelada 50'
Fretes 75'
Attendance: 20,0000
Referee: Ángel Minoli (Uruguay)
4 November 1923 Uruguay  2–0  Paraguay Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Scarone 11'
Petrone 88'
Attendance: 20,0000
Referee: Servando Pérez (Argentina)
11 November 1923 Paraguay  1–0  Brazil Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
I. López 56' Attendance: 15,0000
Referee: Servando Pérez (Argentina)
18 November 1923 Argentina  2–1  Brazil Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Onzari 11'
Saruppo 76'
Nilo 15' Attendance: 15,0000
Referee: Miguel Barba (Paraguay)
25 November 1923 Uruguay  2–1  Brazil Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Petrone 56'
Cea 75'
Nilo 59' Attendance: 20,0000
Referee: Servando Pérez (Argentina)
2 December 1923 Uruguay  2–0  Argentina Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Petrone 28'
Somma 88'
Attendance: 22,0000
Referee: Antônio Carneiro de Campos (Brazil)

1924 Copa América[edit]

During the 1924 Copa América, the stadium hosted all the matches:

12 October 1924 Argentina  0–0  Paraguay Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Attendance: 12,0000
Referee: Ángel Minoli (Uruguay)
19 October 1924 Uruguay  5–0  Chile Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Petrone 40', 53', 88'
Zingone 73'
Romano 78'
Attendance: 15,0000
Referee: Eduardo Jara (Paraguay)
25 October 1924 Argentina  2–0  Chile Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Sosa 5'
Loyarte 78'
Attendance: 15,0000
Referee: Ángel Minoli (Uruguay)
26 October 1924 Uruguay  3–1  Paraguay Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Petrone 28'
Romano 37'
Cea 53'
Sosa 77' Attendance: 14,0000
Referee: Alberto Parodi (Chile)
1 November 1924 Paraguay  3–1  Chile Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
González 15' (52)
López 33'
Arellano 6' Attendance: 10,0000
Referee: Servando Pérez (Argentina)
2 November 1924 Uruguay  0–0  Argentina Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Attendance: 20,0000
Referee: Carlos Fanta (Chile)

1930 FIFA World Cup[edit]

During the 1930 FIFA World Cup, the stadium hosted six matches:

13 July 1930 United States  3–0  Belgium Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
15:00 McGhee 23'
Florie 45'
Patenaude 69'
Attendance: 18,346
Referee: José Macias (Argentina)
14 July 1930 Yugoslavia  2–1  Brazil Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
12:45 Tirnanic 21'
Bek 30'
Preguinho 62' Attendance: 24,059
Referee: Aníbal Tejada (Uruguay)
15 July 1930 Argentina  1–0  France Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
16:00 Monti 81' Attendance: 23,409
Referee: Almeida Rego (Brazil)
16 July 1930 Chile  3–0  Mexico Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
14:45 Vidal 3', 65'
Rosas 51' (o.g.)
Attendance: 9,249
Referee: Henry Cristophe (Bélgica)
17 July 1930 Yugoslavia  4–0  Bolivia Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
12:45 Bek 60' (67)
Marjanovic 65'
Vujadinovic 85'
Attendance: 18,306
Referee: Francisco Mateucci (Uruguay)
17 July 1930 United States  3–0  Paraguay Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
14:45 Patenaude 10', 15', 50' Attendance: 18,306
Referee: José Macias (Argentina)

Major games[edit]

2021 Copa Libertadores Femenina[edit]

Conmebol determined that the tournament would have the final match in the Gran Parque Central stadium, in Uruguay:

21 November 2021 Santa Fe Colombia 0–2 Brazil Corinthians Gran Parque Central, Montevideo
Adriana 10'
Gabi Portilho 42'
Attendance: 15,0000
Referee: Laura Fortunato (Argentina)
VAR: Salomé Di Iorio (Argentina)

Concerts[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "El Parque se agranda". El Observador. Archived from the original on 20 February 2013. Retrieved 27 March 2013.
  2. ^ "Abreu volvió a pisar el templo". Ovación. Archived from the original on 20 March 2013. Retrieved 27 March 2013.
  3. ^ "Lanzan nuevo proyecto de obras en el Parque Central: 200 palcos más". Tenfield. Archived from the original on 4 February 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2014.
  4. ^ "Estadio Gran Parque Central". Archived from the original on 2014-12-20. Retrieved 2014-06-28.
  5. ^ "Press Note" / cite="Con una inversión de entre USS 25 y USS 30 millones, la capacidad del Parque creció a casi 15 mil personas."
  6. ^ El Parque es de la gente
  7. ^ Intendente visitó obras del Gran Parque Central. "El intendente de Montevideo, Daniel Martínez, realizó una visita al histórico Parque Central"
  8. ^ Entre Artigas y el Mundial
  9. ^ GPC, abuelo de América
  10. ^ Sudamericano Sub 20: la acción se traslada al Gran Parque Central, otro histórico escenario
  11. ^ La FIFA y Uruguay celebran el pasado
  12. ^ FIFA.com
  13. ^ A un siglo de la primera Copa en propiedad
  14. ^ La selección uruguaya al Parque: Nacional recibió las columnas para la nueva iluminación
  15. ^ Nacional apunta al Gran Parque Central como estadio para el mundial de 2030
  16. ^ El estadio alberga el Clásico uruguayo 92 años después
  17. ^ Más grande para 2030
  18. ^ De grande a más grande - NACIONAL PRESENTÓ OBRAS PARA GPC
  19. ^ Francia: segundo entrenamiento en el Gran Parque Central
  20. ^ Conoce el Gran Parque Central, donde entrenará Perú antes del choque contra Uruguay [VIDEO]
  21. ^ Palmeiras entrenó por última vez en nuestro Gran Parque Central. Mañana disputará la Final de la Copa #Libertadores 2021.
  22. ^ La selección uruguaya al Parque: Nacional recibió las columnas para la nueva iluminación
  23. ^ El Gran Parque Central se renueva: los detalles de una pantalla gigante de vanguardia
  24. ^ La FIFA y Uruguay celebran el pasado
  25. ^ Blatter en el Parque Central
  26. ^ Infantino en el GPC
  27. ^ Gianni Infantino llegó a Uruguay y visitó el Campeón del Siglo y el Gran Parque Central
  28. ^ La FIFA y Uruguay celebran el pasado
  29. ^ Gianni Infantino llegó a Uruguay y visitó el Campeón del Siglo y el Gran Parque Central
  30. ^ Telemundo
  31. ^ Copa Conmebol Libertadores: Nacional vs. Estudiantes
  32. ^ Argentina - Francia
  33. ^ Yugoslavia - Brazil
  34. ^ Prats, Luis (2010). La crónica celeste (3ª edición). Uruguay: Fin de Siglo.
  35. ^ Perú eligió el Gran Parque Central para su última práctica antes de enfrentar a Uruguay

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°53′04″S 56°09′32″W / 34.884373°S 56.158800°W / -34.884373; -56.158800

Preceded by South American Championship
Finals Venue

1923
Succeeded by
Estadio Gran Parque Central
Montevideo
Preceded by
Estadio Gran Parque Central
Montevideo
South American Championship
Finals Venue

1924
Succeeded by
Multiple
venues