Esther Freud

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Esther Freud (centre) with William Dalrymple and Hanan Ashrawi.

Esther Freud (born 2 May 1963) is a British novelist.

Early life and training[edit]

Born in London,[1] Freud is the daughter of painter Lucian Freud and Bernadine Coverley. She is also a great-granddaughter of Sigmund Freud and niece of Clement Freud. She travelled extensively with her mother as a child, and returned to London at the age of 16 to train as an actress at The Drama Centre.

Career[edit]

She has worked in television and theatre as both actress and writer. Her first credited television appearance, though inauspicious, was as a terrified diner in The Bill in 1984, running frantically out of a Chinese restaurant after it had received a bomb scare. A year later she appeared as an alien in the Doctor Who serial Attack of the Cybermen.[2] Her novels include the semi-autobiographical Hideous Kinky, which was adapted into a film starring Kate Winslet.

She is also the author of The Wild, Gaglow, and The Sea House.[3] She also wrote the foreword for The Summer Book by Tove Jansson.

Freud was named as one of the 20 "Best of Young British Novelists" by Granta magazine in 1993.[3] Her novels have been translated into 13 languages.[3] She is also the co-founder (with Kitty Aldridge) of the women's theatre company Norfolk Broads.

In 2009, she donated the short story Rice Cakes and Starbucks to Oxfam's 'Ox-Tales' project, four collections of UK stories written by 38 authors. Her story was published in the 'Water' collection.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Freud has a sister, fashion designer Bella Freud, and a half-brother, Noah Woodman. Her uncle was the late politician Sir Clement Freud. She has two cousins in the media; Matthew and broadcaster Emma.

She is married to actor David Morrissey, with whom she has three children, and maintains homes in London and Southwold.

Works[edit]

  • Hideous Kinky (1992)
  • Peerless Flats (1993)
  • Gaglow (1997)
  • The Wild (2000)
  • The Sea House (2003)
  • Love Falls (2007)
  • Lucky Break (2010)
  • Mr Mac and Me (2014)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alice O'Keeffe. "Esther Freud: 'I realised the book I'd been writing for 18 months was awful'". the Guardian. 
  2. ^ Freud, Esther (4 April 2009). "I was an alien in Dr Who". The Times (London). Retrieved 4 April 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c British Council. "Esther Freud - British Council Literature". britishcouncil.org. 
  4. ^ Oxfam: Ox-Tales

External links[edit]