Ethan Chorin

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Ethan Chorin
ethan-chorin-2017
Born (1968-12-06) December 6, 1968 (age 50)
NationalityAmerican
EducationU.C. Berkeley
Stanford University
Yale University
OccupationCEO-Perim Associates, LLC
Editor-Africa Review 3 Magazine
Known forAuthor and Middle East expert
Notable work
Translating Libya
(2008, Saqi Books-SOAS)
Exit The Colonel: The Hidden History of the Libyan Revolution
(PublicAffairs, 2012)
How America Lost
the Middle East
(2019, C Hurst & Co
Publishers Ltd)
Websiteethanchorin.com

Ethan Chorin (born Dec. 6, 1968) is a Middle East and Africa-focused scholar and entrepreneur. He is known as a leading analyst of Libyan affairs, and for his applied development work in the Middle East and Africa, in the area of environmental science and healthcare.

Career[edit]

Chorin began his career as a business developer with Shell Oil.[1][2] In 2004 he joined the U.S. Foreign Service, and was one of a small number of U.S. diplomats posted to Libya (2004-2006) immediately following the U.S. rapprochement with Gaddafi c. 2004.[3] He served in Libya as the Economic and Commercial attaché from 2004-2006, and was subsequently posted to Washington, D.C. and the United Arab Emirates. From 2008-2011 he was Senior Manager for Communications, and then Government Relations, at Dubai Ports World (DP World),[4] and was head of the company’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Program from 2009-2011.[5]

Chorin returned to Libya in July, 2011 as co-founder of the 501c(3) non-profit Avicenna Group, to assist with post-revolutionary medical capacity-building.[6] As part of this effort, he recruited Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to work with Benghazi Medical Center (BMC, on a program to build trauma capacity in Benghazi.[7] The MOU for this project was signed a day before the September 11, 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi. Ambassador Christopher Stevens, was to visit BMC to express support for the project the following day.[8] Chorin has written several pieces on the impact of that attack on U.S. foreign policy in the region.[9][10]

Chorin was a Director at Berkeley Research Group (BRG) from 2012-2013, before founding Perim Associates, which advises international law firms and governments. As CEO of Perim Associates, Chorin created the 2015 ministerial East Africa Environmental Risk & Opportunity “ERO” Summit, held in Djibouti, and hosted by the President of the Republic of Djibouti.[11][12] Yale University Climate and Energy Center played a prominent role in the conference,[13] which was highlighted by Secretary of State John Kerry in a Djibouti press conference.[14]

Chorin has spoken and testified on Libya before bodies such as the NATO Parliamentary Assembly[15] and the U.S. Congress. He has been a frequent commentator on Libya for the BBC.[16]

Books[edit]

Chorin has written two books on Libya. Translating Libya (2008, Saqi Books-SOAS)[17] is known as one of the most significant English language sources on Libyan short fiction.[18][19][20][21] It is a collection of translations of 16 short stories set in various locations in Libya, interspersed with Chorin’s travelogue and social commentary. Darf Publishers published an expanded edition in 2015 with a foreword by Libyan novelist Ahmed Ibrahim Fagih.[22]

Chorin’s second book, Exit the Colonel: The Hidden History of the Libyan Revolution, traces the origins of the 2011 Libyan Revolution.[23][24][25] Libya historian Dirk Vandewalle called Exit The Colonel “undoubtedly...the best analytical work on Libya and its revolution for a very long time.[26]"Middle East constitutional lawyer and ex-Lebanese Presidential candidate Chibli Mallat[27] noted that Chorin had “reconstructed the murky events (of the first few days of the Revolution) in remarkable detail.[28]

Education and awards[edit]

Chorin holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley in Agricultural and Resource Economics (2000).[29] Chorin received a master's degree from Stanford University in International Policy Studies (1993)[30] and a bachelor's degree from Yale University in Near Eastern Literature and Civilizations (1991), cum laude, with Distinction in the major[31]

Chorin was a Fulbright Fellow in Amman, Jordan (1994-1995),[32] an IIE Fulbright Hays Doctoral Research Fellow in Aden, Yemen (1998-1999),[33] and a Jean Monnet Fellow at the Ecole polytechnique, France (1993-1994)[34]

Chorin has been a Social Enterprise Fellow at the Yale School of Management (SOM) (2012),[35] a Non-Resident Fellow at the Dubai School of Government (2009-2011),[36] He was a member of the 2008 Obama Campaign’s Foreign Policy Advisory Group.[37] He was recipient of a U.S. Department of State Meritorious Honor Award for his work in Libya, and a Sinclaire Award for language achievement in Farsi[38]

Chorin was born New York City, and grew up in Berkeley, California. He is the son of mathematician Alexander Joel Chorin and Alice Jones Chorin.

Books authored[edit]

  • Chorin, Ethan (2008). Translating Libya. PublicAffairs. p. 238. ISBN 978-0863566479.
  • Chorin, Ethan (2012). Exit the Colonel. Saqi Books-SOAS. p. 384. ISBN 978-1610391719.
  • Chorin, Ethan (2019). How America Lost the Middle East. C Hurst & Co Publishers Ltd. p. 224. ISBN 978-1787381292.

Notable publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ethan Chorin". https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/people/data/ethan_chorin.html. Sep 16, 2014. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  2. ^ "Third World countries receive a helping `hand' - Denver Business Journal". Denver Business Journal. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  3. ^ "Congressional Record, 108th Congress". Congressional Record, 108th Congress, October 7, 2004. October 7, 2004.
  4. ^ "Piracy Conference Outcome" (PDF).
  5. ^ "Fellows". Yale School of Management. 2013-07-09. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  6. ^ "news-telemedicine-retinopathy-screening-libya". optometry.berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  7. ^ "Speakers - World Affairs Council". www.worldaffairs.org. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  8. ^ Chorin, Ethan (2012-09-13). "What Libya Lost When Ambassador Stevens Died". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  9. ^ Chorin, Ethan (2013-05-13). "The Deeper Blame for Benghazi". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  10. ^ "Setting the Record Straight on Benghazi". Foreign Affairs. 2016-03-01. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  11. ^ "Not everybody is united behind climate risk summit - DJIBOUTI - The Indian Ocean Newsletter 27/03/2015". www.africaintelligence.com. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  12. ^ "East Africa ERO Summit Seen as Important Step Towards 'Paris Climate 2015' – Press Releases on CSRwire.com". www.csrwire.com. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  13. ^ "East Africa and Arabia Prepare for a Shared Climate Future". climate.yale.edu. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  14. ^ "Remarks With Djiboutian Foreign Minister Mahamoud Ali Youssouf". U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  15. ^ press@nato-pa.int. "NATO PA - Responsibility to Rebuild and Greater Attention to the Humanitarian Crises Affecting the Middle East and North Africa Top the Agenda at the NATO PA GSM Seminar in Rome, Italy". www.nato-pa.int. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  16. ^ "Libya: Obama's 'biggest regret', Focus on Africa - BBC World Service". BBC. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  17. ^ "translation | The Silphium Gatherer | مجمّع سلفيوم". silphiumgatherer.com. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  18. ^ "translation | The Silphium Gatherer | مجمّع سلفيوم". silphiumgatherer.com. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  19. ^ "Translating Libya: stories of love and hardship by Susanna Tarbush - Common Ground News Service". www.commongroundnews.org. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  20. ^ mlynxqualey (2011-01-17). "Libyan Writing (in English): New, Forthcoming, Beautiful, and Free". Arabic Literature (in English). Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  21. ^ "Book review: Translating Libya by Ethan Chorin opens a window into a diverse country | The National". www.thenational.ae. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  22. ^ Starbush (2016-02-05). "the tanjara: Darf Publishers issues new edition of trailblazing book 'Translating Libya'". the tanjara. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  23. ^ "Diana" (PDF).
  24. ^ "Ahmed Fagih: After the revolution". Bookanista. 2015-11-29. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  25. ^ editor, Marjorie Kehe, Monitor book (2011-02-23). "7 books to help you understand Libya". Christian Science Monitor. ISSN 0882-7729. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  26. ^ Chorin, Ethan (2012-10-23). Exit the Colonel: The Hidden History of the Libyan Revolution. PublicAffairs. ISBN 9781610391719.
  27. ^ "CHIBLI W MALLAT - Biography - Faculty Profile - The University of Utah". faculty.utah.edu. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  28. ^ "Philosophy of Nonviolence". global.oup.com. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  29. ^ Leusmann, Harald (2001-01-01). "Recent (1999-2001) Doctoral Degrees in Middle East Studies". Middle East Studies Association Bulletin. 35 (2): 279–296. JSTOR 23063529.
  30. ^ "The Stanford Daily 11 June 1993 — The Stanford Daily". stanforddailyarchive.com. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  31. ^ "Yale Class of 1991". alumninet.yale.edu. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  32. ^ "Fulbright Scholar Directory | Fulbright Scholar Program". www.cies.org. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  33. ^ "FULBRIGHT-HAYS DOCTORAL DISSERTATION" (PDF).
  34. ^ "The Stanford Daily 11 June 1993 — The Stanford Daily". stanforddailyarchive.com. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  35. ^ "Fellows". Yale School of Management. 2013-07-09. Retrieved 2016-06-20.
  36. ^ "Global Challenge, Regional Responses: Forging a Common Approach to Maritime Piracy".
  37. ^ Not Published
  38. ^ "Past Sinclaire Award Winners". www.afsa.org. Retrieved 2016-06-20.