Etobicoke—Lakeshore (provincial electoral district)

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This article is about the provincial electoral district. For the federal electoral district, see Etobicoke—Lakeshore.
Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario electoral district
Etobicoke Lakeshore.png
Etobicoke—Lakeshore in relation to other Toronto electoral districts
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Ontario
MPP
 
 
 
Peter Milczyn
Liberal
District created 1987
First contested 1987
Last contested 2014
Demographics
Population (2011) 122,999
Electors (2013) 89,550
Area (km²) 41.71
Pop. density (per km²) 2,948.9
Census divisions Toronto
Census subdivisions Toronto

Etobicoke—Lakeshore is a provincial electoral district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It elects one member to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

It was created in 1987 from Lakeshore.

From 1987 to 1999 the district included all of Etobicoke south of a line following the CP Railway to Kipling Avenue to Bloor Street.

In 1999 the border was moved up to a line following Dundas Street to the 427 to Burnhamthorpe Road to Kipling Avenue to Mimico Creek to the Canadian Pacific Railway to Dundas Street.

In 2007, the borders were not altered.

Members of Provincial Parliament[edit]

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Assembly Years Member Party
Riding created from Lakeshore
34th  1987–1990     Ruth Grier New Democratic
36th  1990–1995
36th  1995–1999     Morley Kells Progressive Conservative
37th  1999–2003
38th  2003–2007     Laurel Broten Liberal
39th  2007–2011
40th  2011–2013
 2013–2014     Doug Holyday Progressive Conservative
41st  2014–Present     Peter Milczyn Liberal
Sourced from the Ontario Legislative Assembly[1]

Election results[edit]

Ontario general election, 2014
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Peter Milczyn 24,311 47.48 +5.18
Progressive Conservative Doug Holyday 17,587 34.35 -12.40
New Democratic P. C. Choo 6,362 12.43 +5.02
Green Angela Salewsky 2,064 4.03 +1.78
Libertarian Mark Wrzesniewski 336 0.66 +0.22
Socialist Natalie Lochwin 236 0.46
Freedom Jeff Merklinger 198 0.39 +0.26
Ontario Moderate Party Ian Lytvyn 108 0.21
Total valid votes 51,202 100.0  
Liberal gain from Progressive Conservative Swing +8.79
Source: Elections Ontario[2]
Ontario provincial by-election, August 1, 2013
Resignation of Laurel Broten
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Doug Holyday 16,034 46.75 +17.51
Liberal Peter Milczyn 14,506 42.30 -8.72
New Democratic P. C. Choo 2,542 7.41 -8.04
Green Angela Salewsky 771 2.25 -0.43
Special Needs Dan King 157 0.46 +0.07
Libertarian Hans Kunov 152 0.44 +0.05
People's Kevin Clarke 87 0.25  
Freedom Wayne Simmons 46 0.13 -0.27
Total valid votes 34,295 100.00
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 214 0.62
Turnout 34,509 37.95
Eligible voters 90,927
Progressive Conservative gain Swing +13.12
Source: Elections Ontario[3]

Police detective Steve Ryan had originally been nominated by the Progressive Conservatives, however, according to party leader Tim Hudak, Ryan was unable to run in the by-election due to injuries sustained in a work related automobile accident; city councillor Doug Holyday was recruited to be the party's candidate instead.[4]

Ontario general election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Laurel Broten 22,169 51.02 +5.03
Progressive Conservative Simon Nyilassy 12,705 29.24 -1.43
New Democratic Dionne Coley 6,713 15.45 +2.17
Green Angela Salewsky 1,164 2.68 - 5.21
Freedom Mark Brombacher 174 0.40
Libertarian Hans Kunov 172 0.40
Socialist Natalie Lochwin 125 0.29
Independent John Letonja 113 0.26
Independent Thane MacKay 113 0.26
Total valid votes 43,448 100.00
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 255 0.58
Turnout 43,703 50.01
Eligible voters 87,390
Liberal hold Swing +3.23
Source: Elections Ontario[5]
Ontario general election, 2007
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Laurel Broten 20,218 45.99 +1.83
Progressive Conservative Tom Barlow 13,482 30.67 -1.92
New Democratic Andrea Németh 5,837 13.28 -6.81
Green Jerry Schulman 3,467 7.89 +6.30
Independent Janice Murray 480 1.09 +0.59
Family Coalition Bob Williams 478 1.09 +0.01
Total valid votes 43,962 100.00
Elections Ontario:[6]
Ontario general election, 2003
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Laurel Broten 19,680 44.16 +8.31
Progressive Conservative Morley Kells 14,524 32.59 -14.39
New Democratic Irene Jones 8,952 20.09 +5.37
Green Junyee Wang 708 1.59
Family Coalition Ted Kupiec 480 1.08 +0.12
Independent Janice Murray 225 0.50 -0.18
Total valid votes 44,569 100.00
Elections Ontario:[7]
Ontario general election, 1999
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Morley Kells 20,602 46.98 +1.75
Liberal Laurel Broten 15,723 35.85 +6.27
New Democratic Vicki Obedkoff 6,457 14.72 -10.45
Family Coalition Kevin McGourty 423 0.96
Natural Law Don Jackson 349 0.80 +0.16
Independent Janice Murray 299 0.68
Total valid votes 43,853 100.00
Elections Ontario:[8]
Ontario general election, 1995
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Morley Kells 14,879 45.23 +29.69
Liberal Bruce Davis 9,074 27.58 +5.15
New Democratic Ruth Grier 8,279 25.17 -32.83
Libertarian Daniel Hunt 270 0.82
Natural Law Geraldine Jackson 209 0.64
Independent Julie Northrup 186 0.56
Total valid votes 32,897 100.00
Elections Ontario:[9]
Ontario general election, 1990
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Ruth Grier 18,118 58.00 +13.41
Liberal Sam Shephard 7,006 22.43 -15.04
Progressive Conservative Jeff Knoll 4,854 15.54 +1.22
Family Coalition Trish O'Connor 1,053 3.37 -0.25
Green Phaedra Livingstone 209 0.67
Total valid votes 31,240 100.00
Toronto Star[10]
Ontario general election, 1987
Party Candidate Votes %
New Democratic Ruth Grier 14,821 44.59
Liberal Frank Sgarlata 12,454 37.47
Progressive Conservative Al Kolyn 4,760 14.32
Family Coalition Michael Doyle 1,203 3.62
Total valid votes 33,238 100.00
Toronto Star:[11]

2007 electoral reform referendum[edit]

Ontario electoral reform referendum, 2007
Side Votes %
First Past the Post 25,800 60.8
Mixed member proportional 16,658 39.2
Total valid votes 42,458 100.0

References[edit]

  1. ^ For a listing of each MPP's Queen's Park curriculum vitae see below:
    • For Ruth Grier's Legislative Assembly information see "Ruth Grier, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2014. Retrieved 2014-09-08. 
    • For Morley Kells' Legislative Assembly information see "Morley Kells, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2014. Retrieved 2014-09-08. 
    • For Laurel Broten's Legislative Assembly information see "Laurel Broten, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2014. Retrieved 2014-09-08. 
    • For Doug Holyday's Legislative Assembly information see "Doug Holyday, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2014. Retrieved 2014-09-08. 
    • For Peter Milczyn's Legislative Assembly information see "Peter Milczyn, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2014. Retrieved 2014-09-08. 
  2. ^ Elections Ontario (2014). "Official result from the records, 024 Etobicoke—Lakeshore" (PDF). Retrieved 27 June 2015. 
  3. ^ "Official return from the records / Rapport des registres officiels - Etobicoke—Lakeshore" (PDF). Elections Ontario. 2013. Retrieved 2014-05-10. 
  4. ^ Canadian Press (July 4, 2013). "Deputy Mayor Doug Holyday to run for provincial Conservatives". Newstalk 1010. Retrieved July 4, 2013. 
  5. ^ "2011 Official Poll by Poll Results: Etobicoke-Lakeshore" (PDF). Elections Ontario. 2011. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  6. ^ Elections Ontario. "2007 Official Poll by Poll Results: Etobicoke-Lakeshore" (PDF). Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  7. ^ Elections Ontario. "Poll by Poll Elections Ontario, General Election of October 2, 2003:Etobicoke—Lakeshore". Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  8. ^ Elections Ontario. "Poll by Poll Elections Ontario, General Election of June 3, 1999: Etobicoke—Lakeshore". Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  9. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. 1995-06-08. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  10. ^ "How Metro-Area Voted". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1990-09-07. p. A10. 
  11. ^ "How Metro-Area Voted". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1987-09-11. p. A12. 

External links[edit]