Eugen Maximilianovich, 5th Duke of Leuchtenberg

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Eugen Maximilianovich
Duke of Leuchtenberg
LeichtenbergEugen.jpg
Eugen Maxmilianovich, Duke of Leuchtenberg
Born (1847-02-08)8 February 1847
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Died 31 August 1901(1901-08-31) (aged 54)
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Burial Alexander Nevsky Lavra, St. Petersburg
Spouse Daria Konstantinowa Opotschinina (1869-1870; her death)
Zeneïde Dmitrijewna Skobelew (1878-1899; her death)
Issue Daria, Countess of Beauharnais
Full name
Eugen Maximilianovich Romanowsky
House House of Beauharnais
Father Maximilian de Beauharnais, 3rd Duke of Leuchtenberg
Mother Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia

Eugen Maximilianovich Romanowsky, 5th Duke of Leuchtenberg, Prince Romanowsky (8 February 1847 - 31 August 1901) was a son of Maximilian de Beauharnais, 3rd Duke of Leuchtenberg and Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia Duke of Leuchtenberg. He succeeded his brother Nicholas Maximilianovich as Duke of Leuchtenberg from 1891 until his death.

Early life[edit]

Eugen Maximilianovich was born in Saint Petersburg in 1847, as the second son and fifth child of Maximilian de Beauharnais, 3rd Duke of Leuchtenberg and Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia. After the death of his father in 1852, Eugen's older brother Nicolas became the fourth Duke of Leuchtenberg. When he died without an heir in 1891, Eugen became the fifth Duke, until his death in 1901. He was then succeeded by his younger brother George.

On 18 December 1852, after the death of their father, all the children of Duke Maximilian were allowed to wear the princely name and title of Romanowsky (or Romanovskaja for the female descendants), and were styled Imperial Highness.[1]

Marriages[edit]

Zina Skobelew, second wife of Duke Eugene

In 1869, he married Daria Konstantinowa Opotschinina, the granddaughter of Mikhail Kutuzov: she was made Countess of Beauharnais (died 1870 in childbirth).

  • Daria, Countess de Beauharnais (19 March 1870, Saint Petersburg - 4 November 1937, Leningrad, Saint Petersburg). She married, firstly, Prince Leon Kotchoubey (1862-1927) in Baden-Baden, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wurttemberg on 7 September 1893; they divorced in 1911. Married, secondly, Waldemar, Baron von Graevenitz (1872-1916) in Saint Petersburg on 22 February 1911. Married, thirdly, Victor Markezetti (d. 15 January 1938). She had one child with her first husband:
    • Prince Eugéne Kotchoubey de Beauharnais (24 July 1894, Peterhof - 6 November 1951, Paris)

In 1878 he married Zeneïde Dmitrijewna Skobelew (also known as Zina) (died 1899), sister to the Russian general Mikhail Skobelev. Zina later had an open long-term affair with Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia.

Career[edit]

Eugen was a Division General in the Imperial Russian Army. In 1872-1873, he participated in the attack on Khiva and was awarded the Order of St. George, fourth degree. Between 1874 and 1877 he was commander of the Alexandria 5th Hussars. For his work in the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, he received the Order of St. Vladimir third class. He became a Lieutenant general in 1886, and was commander of the 37th Infantry Division from 1888 until 1893.

He died in 1901 in St. Petersburg, and is buried in the Alexander Nevsky Lavra.

Titles, styles, honours and arms[edit]

Coat of Arms of the Dukes of Leuchtenberg

Titles and styles[edit]

  • 8 February 1847 – 25 December 1890: His Imperial Highness Prince Eugen Maximilianovich of Leuchtenberg
  • 25 December 1890 – 31 August 1901: His Imperial Highness The Duke of Leuchtenberg

Honors[edit]

See also[edit]

Ancestry[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oertel, Friedrich Maximilian (1854). Genealogische Tafeln zur europäischen Staatengeschichte der germanischen und slawischen Völker im neunzehnten Jahrhunderte (in German). Brockhaus. p. 14. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
Eugen Maximilianovich, 5th Duke of Leuchtenberg
Born: 29 February 1852 Died: 16 May 1912
German nobility
Preceded by
Eugen Maximilianovich
Duke of Leuchtenberg
6 January 1891 – 31 August 1901
Succeeded by
Alexander Georgievich