Eugene Robinson (journalist)

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Eugene Robinson
Eugene Robinson by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Robinson in June 2016
Born Eugene Harold Robinson
(1954-03-12)12 March 1954
Orangeburg, South Carolina, U.S.
Education University of Michigan
Occupation Journalist
Notable credit(s) The Washington Post
San Francisco Chronicle

Eugene Harold Robinson (born March 12, 1954) is a liberal American newspaper columnist and the former assistant managing editor of The Washington Post. His columns are syndicated by The Washington Post Writers Group, and he is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 2009.

Robinson also serves, opposite Nicolle Wallace, as NBC News and MSNBC's chief political analyst during political coverage.

Robinson is a board member of the IWMF (International Women's Media Foundation).[1]

Biography[edit]

Early years[edit]

Robinson was born in Orangeburg, South Carolina, and schooled at Orangeburg Wilkinson High School. At the University of Michigan, he wrote for The Michigan Daily school newspaper.

Career[edit]

In 1976, he began his journalism career at the San Francisco Chronicle; his assignments included the trial of publishing heiress Patty Hearst. He joined The Washington Post in 1980. Working his way up through the ranks, he was first a city-hall reporter at the paper. He then became the assistant city editor; a foreign correspondent in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and London, England; and, most recently, the assistant managing editor of the paper's style section. He began writing columns for the opinion page of the paper in 2005, also writes a twice-a-week column on politics and culture, and conducts a weekly online conversation with readers.

Robinson appears frequently as a liberal political analyst[2] on MSNBC cable-TV network's programs such as Morning Joe, PoliticsNation with Al Sharpton, The Rachel Maddow Show, The Ed Show, Hardball with Chris Matthews, and Countdown with Keith Olbermann. In addition, he is often a panelist on NBC's public affairs program Meet the Press.

Robinson was awarded the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in recognition of his columns that focused on then-Senator Barack Obama in the context of his first presidential campaign.[3]

Personal life[edit]

He lives with wife Avis and two sons in Arlington, Virginia.

Books[edit]

  • Coal to Cream: A Black Man's Journey Beyond Color to an Affirmation of Race. New York: Free Press. 1999. ISBN 0-684-85722-7. 
  • Last Dance in Havana: The Final Days of Fidel and the Start of the New Cuban Revolution. New York: Free Press. 2004. ISBN 0-7432-4622-5. 
  • Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America. New York: Doubleday. 2010. ISBN 0-385-52654-7. 

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]