Euler Book Prize

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The Euler Book Prize is an award named after Swiss mathematician and physicist Leonhard Euler (1707-1783) and given annually at the Joint Mathematics Meetings by the Mathematical Association of America to an outstanding book in mathematics that is likely to improve the public view of the field.[1]

The prize was founded in 2005 with funds provided by mathematician Paul Halmos (1916–2006) and his wife Virginia. It was first given in 2007; this date was chosen to honor the 300th anniversary of Euler's birth, as part of the MAA "Year of Euler" celebration.[1][2]

Winners[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f The Mathematical Association of America's Euler Book Prize, retrieved 2011-02-01.
  2. ^ a b Siegel, Martha J. (February 2007), "JMM 2007: Report of the MAA Secretary" (PDF), Focus (Mathematical Association of America): 8–10 .
  3. ^ Gowers, Timothy (October 9, 2003), "Prime time for mathematics", Nature 425 (562), doi:10.1038/425562a .
  4. ^ Euler Prize citation, MAA, 2007, retrieved 2011-02-01.
  5. ^ Derbyshire, John (January 8, 2007), "Big Easy", National Review .
  6. ^ Euler prize citation for Yandell, MAA, 2008, retrieved 2011-02-01.
  7. ^ Ellenberg, Jordan (September 6, 2006), "Symmetry in Motion", Washington Post .
  8. ^ January 2009 Prizes and Award, Mathematical Association of America, retrieved 2011-02-01.
  9. ^ January 2010 Prizes and Awards, American Mathematical Society, retrieved 2011-02-01.
  10. ^ January 2011 Prizes and Awards, American Mathematical Society, retrieved 2011-02-01.