Euro-Asia Air

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Euro-Asia Air
IATA ICAO Callsign
5B EAK EAKAZ
Hubs Atyrau Airport
Fleet size 7
Parent company KazMunayGas
Headquarters Atyrau, Kazakhstan
Website eaa.kz

Euro-Asia Air is an airline based in Atyrau, Kazakhstan. It operates passenger services to Russia, United Arab Emirates, Turkey and within the Asian republics. Its main base is Atyrau Airport.[1]

History[edit]

The airline started operations in May 1997.[1] In November 2000, Atyrau Airways and Atyrau Airport were transferred to the ownership of Euro-Asia Air, a subsidiary of state petroleum company Kaztransoil.[2] The airline is now wholly owned by KazMunayGas and has 412 employees (at March 2017).[1] The main activities of the company are rendering services for air transportation to legal entities and individuals. Performing flights for the development and development of mineral deposits, servicing oil pipelines, gas pipelines and power lines "Euro-Asia Air" is the largest airline in Kazakhstan, specializing in helicopter operations and passenger transportation. Operating in accordance with international safety standards. The company operates a fleet of helicopter equipment of Russian and Western production and a fleet of passenger aircraft equipped with modern on-board equipment. The aircraft fleet consists of 19 aircraft, including: 11 Mi-8T helicopters (RF); 2 helicopters of model AS-365N3 (France); 2 Challenger-850 and Challenger-870 aircraft (Canada); 4 helicopters model Augusta Westland-139 (Italy).[3]

Fleet[edit]

Challenger-870

The Euro-Asia Air fleet includes the following aircraft as of November 2012

Euro-Asia Air Fleet
Aircraft In Fleet Orders Passengers Notes
Bombardier CRJ700 1 0 70
Bombardier Challenger 850 1 0 TBA
AgustaWestland AW139 4 0 12
Mil Mi-8 11 0 TBA
Eurocopter AS365 2 0 TBA

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Directory: World Airlines". Flight International. 2007-04-03. p. 78. 
  2. ^ "Directory: World Airlines". Flight International. 2007-03-27. p. 52. 
  3. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on May 11, 2012. Retrieved October 6, 2012. 

External links[edit]