Europe (Europe album)

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Europe
Europe - Europe (original album cover).jpg
Studio album by Europe
Released 14 March 1983
Recorded The Electra Studio, Stockholm, Sweden
Genre Heavy metal
Length 39:42
Label Hot (Sweden)
Victor (Japan)
Epic (rest of the world)
Producer Europe, Erik Videgård, Thomas Erdtman
Europe chronology
Europe
(1983)
Wings of Tomorrow
(1984)
Singles from Europe
  1. "Seven Doors Hotel" / "Words of Wisdom"
    Released: 31 March 1983
CD re-issue cover
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 3/5 stars[1]
The Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal 10/10[2]
Metal Forces (8/10)[3]

Europe is the first studio album by the Swedish band Europe. It was released on 14 March 1983, by Hot Records.

Track listing[edit]

All songs were written by Joey Tempest, except where noted.

Side one
  1. "In the Future to Come" – 5:00
  2. "Farewell" – 4:16
  3. "Seven Doors Hotel" – 5:16
  4. "The King Will Return" – 5:35
  5. "Boyazont" [instrumental] (John Norum, Eddie Meduza) – 2:32
Side two
  1. "Children of This Time" – 4:55
  2. "Words of Wisdom" – 4:05
  3. "Paradize Bay" – 3:53
  4. "Memories" – 4:32

Personnel[edit]

Europe[edit]

Production[edit]

  • Europeproducer
  • Erik Videgård – co-producer, engineer
  • Thomas Erdtman – co-producer
  • Lennart Dannstedt – photography
  • Camilla B. – cover design

Charts[edit]

Year Chart Position
1983 Swedish Album Chart[4] 8
Japanese Albums Chart[5] 62

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Europe - Europe". Allmusic. Retrieved 3 August 2011. 
  2. ^ Popoff, Martin (1 November 2005). The Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal: Volume 2: The Eighties. Burlington, Ontario, Canada: Collector's Guide Publishing. p. 108. ISBN 978-1-894959-31-5. 
  3. ^ Reynolds, Dave (August 1983). "Europe - Europe". Metal Forces (1): 22. Retrieved 3 July 2015. 
  4. ^ "Europe - Europe (album)". Swedishcharts.com. Media Control Charts. Retrieved 21 September 2016. 
  5. ^ AA.VV. (25 April 2006). Album Chart-Book Complete Edition 1970~2005. Tokyo, Japan: Oricon. ISBN 978-487-1-31077-2.