European Academy of Sciences

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The European Academy of Sciences (EurASc) (Latin: Academia Scientiarum Europaea) is an international non-profit organization) aiming to promote excellence in science and technology.[1] Based in Brussels, Belgium, it has about 550 members, including 65 Nobel Prize and Fields Medal winners,[citation needed] from 47 countries. It was established on 17 December 2003.

Since 2004, the academy has published multidisciplinary annals, e-newsletters for science and technology, and since 2009 various books. Its first general assemblies and ceremonies of awards were organized in Brussels and since 2009 each year in another country (2009: Università di Bologna, Italy; 2010: Academy of Athens, Greece; 2011: Università di Milano, Italy; 2012: Université de Liège, Belgium; 2013: L.C.C de Toulouse, France; 2014: Cada do Infante, Porto, Portugal; 2015: Le Quartz Centre de Congrès Brest, France; 2016: Palais des Académies in Brussels, Belgium). Since 2012 the academy has also organized an annual symposium called The Future of Sciences in the 21st Century.

Divisions[edit]

The academy has nine divisions:

  • Chemistry
  • Computational and Information Sciences
  • Earth and Environmental Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Materials Science
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine and Life Sciences
  • Physics
  • Social Sciences

Awards[edit]

Leonardo da Vinci Award[edit]

The Leonardo da Vinci Award was established in 2009 for Outstanding Lifelong Achievement. One award is attributed per year.[2]

Awardees[edit]

Blaise Pascal Medals[edit]

The Blaise Pascal Medal

The Blaise Pascal Medal was established in 2003 to recognise an outstanding and demonstrated personal contribution to science and technology and the promotion of excellence in research and education. Up to six medals may be awarded in any one year.[3]

Awardees[edit]

Chemistry[edit]

  • 2007 : Frans Carl de Schryver (BE)
  • 2009 : Vincenzo Balzani (IT)
  • 2010 : Henry B. Kagan (FR)
  • 2011 : Helmut Schwarz[5] (DE)
  • 2012 : Jean-Pierre Sauvage (FR)
  • 2014 : Hubert Schmidbaur (DE)
  • 2015 : Herbert W. Roesky (DE)

Computational and Information Sciences[edit]

  • 2003 : Boris Verkhovsky (USA)
  • 2004 : Robert Tarjan (USA)
  • 2007 : Oscar H. Ibarra[12] (USA)
  • 2008 : Moshe Y. Vardi[13] (USA)
  • 2009 : Thomas Kailath (USA)
  • 2011 : Gordon Plotkin (GB)

Earth and Environmental Sciences[edit]

  • 2003 : Enders Robinson (USA)
  • 2005 : Khalid Aziz (USA)
  • 2007 : Sven Erik Jørgensen (DK)
  • 2014 : Jean Pierre Gattuso (FR)
  • 2015 : Corinne Le Quéré (GB) and Christos Zerefos (GR)

Engineering[edit]

  • 2004 : Stan Veprek (DE)
  • 2005 : Marie-Paule Pileni (FR)
  • 2010 : Anthony Kounadis (GR)
  • 2011 : Giulio Maier (IT)
  • 2013 : Dmitry Klimov (RU)

Materials Science[edit]

  • 2007 : Alexander N. Guz (UA)
  • 2008 : Terence G. Langdon[11] (GB)
  • 2009 : Herbert Gleiter (DE)
  • 2010 : Martin Schadt (CH)
  • 2011 : Ruslan Valiev (RU)
  • 2012 : Hans-Joachim Freund (DE)
  • 2013 : Maurizio Prato (IT)
  • 2014 : Sir John M. Thomas (UK)
  • 2015 : Ulrike Diebold (DE)

Mathematics[edit]

  • 2004 : Lev Kudryavtsev (RU)
  • 2005 : Edmund Hlawka (AT)
  • 2008 : Willi Jaeger (DE)
  • 2009 : Pierre-Arnaud Raviart (FR)
  • 2011 : Karl Sigmund (DE)
  • 2012 : Franco Brezzi (IT)
  • 2013 : Benoit Perthame (FR)
  • 2015 : Luis Vega (SP)

Medicine and Life Sciences[edit]

  • 2003 : Jan Balzarini (BE) and Eric De Clercq (BE)
  • 2004 : Erich Windhab (CH)
  • 2005 : Peter W. H. Holland (GB)
  • 2007 : Howard Green (USA)
  • 2008 : Saverio Cinti[8] (IT)
  • 2009 : Edgardo D. Carosella (fr) (FR)
  • 2010 : Howard Morris[9] (GB)
  • 2011 : Peter Carmeliet (BE)
  • 2012 : Steven Laureys[10] (BE)

Physics[edit]

  • 2003 : Enzo Tiezzi (IT)
  • 2004 : Emmanuel Floratos (GR) and Manuel Cardona (ES/DE)
  • 2005 : Isaak M. Khalatnikov (RU)
  • 2007 : Edward Layer (PL)
  • 2008 : Bernard Barbara (fr)[6] (FR)
  • 2009 : Jean Dalibard (fr) [7] (FR)
  • 2010 : David Sherrington (GB) and Giovanni F. BIGNAMI (IT)
  • 2011 : Peter Zoller (AUT)
  • 2012 : Charles Joachain (BE)
  • 2013 : Anne L'Huillier (FR)
  • 2014 : Daniel Loss (CH)
  • 2015 : Manuel Garcia Velarde (SP)

Social Sciences[edit]

  • 2008 : Georges Van den Abbeele[14] (USA/BE)
  • 2009 : Claude DEBRU (FR)
  • 2014 : Eberhard Knobloch (DE)
  • 2015 : Martin Carrier (DE)

Symposia[edit]

The academy organizes each year an awards ceremony scientists for their works in different fields of science. The ceremony, hosted by a European university, is generally coupled with a one-day symposium ("The Future of Science in the 21st Century") focussing on a subject of general interest.

Controversy[edit]

[clarification needed] An Italian group using the same name had come under scrutiny in 2002 for listing members who were unaware of their names being used,[4] for holding meetings in secret, and for allegations of fraudulent use of research funds.[5] The European Academy of Sciences is not a member of umbrella organisations like the InterAcademy Panel on International Issues[6] or the All European Academy,[7] and the United Kingdom's Royal Society issued a statement on 31 October 2002 warning scientists "to exercise due caution before making financial commitments" to EAS.[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]