European Christian Political Movement

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European Christian Political Movement
President Peter Östman
Founded November 2002
Headquarters Bergstraat 33, 3811 NG Amersfoort, Netherlands
Ideology Christian democracy
Social conservatism
Political position Center to Centre-right
European Parliament group European Conservatives and Reformists
Colours Green and blue
Website
www.ecpm.info
Politics of the European Union
Political parties
Elections

The European Christian Political Movement (ECPM) is a political party at European level that unites national parties from across Europe that share Christian democratic politics. The member parties are generally more socially conservative and Eurosceptic than the European People's Party. The ECPM unites parties with a Christian social view.

The party was founded in November 2002 in Lakitelek, Hungary. It elected its first board in January 2005, and was registered in the Netherlands in September 2005. The first ECPM president was Peeter Võsu of the Party of Estonian Christian Democrats. The party has thirty members from across sixteen countries. Youth movements are welcome in the European Christian Political Youth Network that started in 2004 and installed its first board in summer 2005.

The ECPM has six Members of the European Parliament, Peter van Dalen of ChristianUnion (NL), Bas Belder of the Dutch Reformed Party (NL), Branislav Škripek of OL'aNO (SK), Arne Gericke of Family Party of Germany (DE), Marek Jurek of Right Wing of the Republic (PL) and Beatrix von Storch of Alternative for Germany (DE) who all sit with the European Conservatives and Reformists.

History[edit]

This platform had started in November 2002 when representatives of political parties from more than 15 countries decided to examine new chances for Christian politics in Europe on the conference "For a Christian Europe" at Lakitelek, Hungary.

The ECPM started with parties and organizations regardless of their denominative background. Parties residing in and outside the EU participate in this first years and make it possible to create a movement that is solidly continuing. In 2003 the ECPM adopted eight Guiding Principles in the Lakitelek declaration "Values for Europe", which shapes ECPM's vision on Europe and in January 2005 in Tallinn, Estonia the ECPM elected its first board. On 15 September 2005 ECPM was officially registered with statutes as an association under Dutch law. In 2010 ECPM was officially recognized as a European political party by the European parliament.[1] ECPM is chaired by Peter Östman. In 2014 ECPM took part in the European Elections for the first time as a European Party.

Foundation[edit]

The European Christian Political Foundation (ECPF) is the official thinktank of the ECPM.

Member parties[edit]

Full members[edit]

Party Abbr. Country
Christian Democratic Union CDU  Armenia
Right Wing of the Republic PR Poland
Croatian Growth Hrast Croatia
Estonian Christian Democrats EKD  Estonia
Christian Democratic People's Party KDM  Georgia
Christian Democratic Party PCD  France
Bündnis C AUF & PBC  Germany
Christian Peoples Alliance CPA  United Kingdom
Christian Democratic Union KDS  Latvia
Christian-Democratic People's Party PPCD Moldova
ChristianUnion CU  Netherlands
Reformed Political Party SGP  Netherlands
Bulgarian Union of Banat UBB  Romania
Evangelical People's Party EVP – PEV   Switzerland
Christian Democratic Union ХДС  Ukraine
European Christian Political Youth ECPYouth  Europe

Associates[edit]

 Romania

 United Kingdom

 Belgium

 United States

 Netherlands

 Serbia

 France

 Italy

 Armenia

 Bulgaria

 Moldova

 Russia

 Germany

 Hungary

Congresses[edit]

The ECPM organizes an annual member congress. Specific themes are discussed during these congresses. The ECPM also organizes regional conferences all over Europe.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Grants from the European Parliament to political parties at European level 2004–2012", November 2012, from http://www.europarl.europa.eu/, retrieved 25 January 2013

External links[edit]