European Cup and UEFA Champions League records and statistics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Map of UEFA countries, stages reached by teams on the UEFA Champions League and European Cup:
  UEFA member nation with winning clubs
  UEFA member nation with runner-up clubs
  UEFA member nation that has been represented in the semi-final stage
  UEFA member nation that has been represented in the round of 16, quarter-final or second group stage
  UEFA member nation that has been represented in the group stage
  UEFA member nation that has not been represented in the group or knockout stage after round of 16
  Not a UEFA member

This page details statistics of the European Cup and Champions League. Unless noted, these statistics concern all seasons since the inception of the European Cup in the 1955–56 season, and renamed since 1992 as the UEFA Champions League. This does not include the qualifying rounds of the UEFA Champions League, unless otherwise noted.[1]

General performances[edit]

By club[edit]

A total of 23 clubs have won the tournament since its 1955 inception, with Real Madrid being the only team to win it fourteen times, including the first five. Only three other clubs have reached ten or more finals: AC Milan, Bayern Munich and Liverpool. A total of thirteen clubs have won the tournament multiple times: the four forementioned clubs, along with Benfica, Inter Milan, Ajax, Nottingham Forest, Juventus, Manchester United, Porto, Barcelona and Chelsea. A total of nineteen clubs have reached the final without ever managing to win the tournament.

Clubs from ten countries have provided tournament winners. Spanish clubs have been the most successful, winning nineteen titles. England is second with fifteen and Italy is third with twelve, while the other multiple-time winners are Germany with eight, the Netherlands with six, and Portugal with four. The only other countries to provide a tournament winner are Scotland, Romania, Yugoslavia, and France. Greece, Belgium and Sweden have all provided losing finalists.


Performances in the European Cup and UEFA Champions League by club
Club
Title(s) Runners-up Seasons won Seasons runner-up
Spain Real Madrid 14 3 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1966, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2022 1962, 1964, 1981
Italy Milan 7 4 1963, 1969, 1989, 1990, 1994, 2003, 2007 1958, 1993, 1995, 2005
Germany Bayern Munich 6 5 1974, 1975, 1976, 2001, 2013, 2020 1982, 1987, 1999, 2010, 2012
England Liverpool 6 4 1977, 1978, 1981, 1984, 2005, 2019 1985, 2007, 2018, 2022
Spain Barcelona 5 3 1992, 2006, 2009, 2011, 2015 1961, 1986, 1994
Netherlands Ajax 4 2 1971, 1972, 1973, 1995 1969, 1996
Italy Inter Milan 3 3 1964, 1965, 2010 1967, 1972, 2023
England Manchester United 3 2 1968, 1999, 2008 2009, 2011
Italy Juventus 2 7 1985, 1996 1973, 1983, 1997, 1998, 2003, 2015, 2017
Portugal Benfica 2 5 1961, 1962 1963, 1965, 1968, 1988, 1990
England Chelsea 2 1 2012, 2021 2008
England Nottingham Forest 2 0 1979, 1980
Portugal Porto 2 0 1987, 2004
Scotland Celtic 1 1 1967 1970
Germany Hamburger SV 1 1 1983 1980
Romania Steaua București 1 1 1986 1989
France Marseille 1 1 1993 1991
Germany Borussia Dortmund 1 1 1997 2013
England Manchester City 1 1 2023 2021
Netherlands Feyenoord 1 0 1970
England Aston Villa 1 0 1982
Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 1 0 1988
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 1 0 1991
Spain Atlético Madrid 0 3 1974, 2014, 2016
France Reims 0 2 1956, 1959
Spain Valencia 0 2 2000, 2001
Italy Fiorentina 0 1 1957
Germany Eintracht Frankfurt 0 1 1960
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan 0 1 1966
Greece Panathinaikos 0 1 1971
England Leeds United 0 1 1975
France Saint-Étienne 0 1 1976
Germany Borussia Mönchengladbach 0 1 1977
Belgium Club Brugge 0 1 1978
Sweden Malmö FF 0 1 1979
Italy Roma 0 1 1984
Italy Sampdoria 0 1 1992
Germany Bayer Leverkusen 0 1 2002
France Monaco 0 1 2004
England Arsenal 0 1 2006
England Tottenham Hotspur 0 1 2019
France Paris Saint-Germain 0 1 2020

By nation[edit]

Nation Winners Runners-up Winning clubs Runners-up
 Spain 19 11 Real Madrid (14)
Barcelona (5)
Atlético Madrid (3)
Barcelona (3)
Real Madrid (3)
Valencia (2)
 England 15 11 Liverpool (6)
Manchester United (3)
Chelsea (2)
Nottingham Forest (2)
Aston Villa (1)
Manchester City (1)
Liverpool (4)
Manchester United (2)
Arsenal (1)
Chelsea (1)
Leeds United (1)
Manchester City (1)
Tottenham Hotspur (1)
 Italy 12 17 Milan (7)
Inter Milan (3)
Juventus (2)
Juventus (7)
Milan (4)
Inter Milan (3)
Fiorentina (1)
Roma (1)
Sampdoria (1)
 Germany 8 10 Bayern Munich (6)
Hamburger SV (1)
Borussia Dortmund (1)
Bayern Munich (5)
Bayer Leverkusen (1)
Borussia Dortmund (1)
Borussia Mönchengladbach (1)
Eintracht Frankfurt (1)
Hamburger SV (1)
 Netherlands 6 2 Ajax (4)
Feyenoord (1)
PSV Eindhoven (1)
Ajax (2)
 Portugal 4 5 Benfica (2)
Porto (2)
Benfica (5)
 France 1 6 Marseille (1) Reims (2)
Saint-Étienne (1)
Marseille (1)
Monaco (1)
Paris Saint-Germain (1)
 Yugoslavia 1 1 Red Star Belgrade (1) Partizan (1)
 Romania 1 1 Steaua București (1) Steaua București (1)
 Scotland 1 1 Celtic (1) Celtic (1)
 Greece 0 1 Panathinaikos (1)
 Belgium 0 1 Club Brugge (1)
 Sweden 0 1 Malmö FF (1)

Overall team records[edit]

In this ranking 2 points are awarded for a win, 1 for a draw and 0 for a loss. As per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws. Teams are ranked by total points, then by goal difference, then by goals scored. Only the top 25 are listed (includes qualifying rounds).[2]

As of 17 April 2024
Rank Club Seasons Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts FW F SF QF
1 Spain Real Madrid 54 486 292 84 110 1069 533 +536 668 14 17 33 39
2 Germany Bayern Munich 40 392 236 78 78 822 382 +440 550 6 11 21 34
3 Spain Barcelona 34 349 203 77 69 687 357 +330 483 5 8 17 25
4 England Manchester United 31 299 161 70 68 545 299 +246 392 3 5 12 19
5 Italy Juventus 37 301 153 70 78 479 301 +178 376 2 9 12 19
6 Italy Milan 31 273 133 70 70 442 259 +183 336 7 11 14 18
7 England Liverpool 27 248 142 50 56 472 228 +244 334 6 10 12 17
8 Portugal Benfica 43 293 131 68 94 482 345 +137 330 2 7 8 20
9 Portugal Porto 38 277 126 61 90 411 313 +98 313 2 2 3 11
10 Netherlands Ajax 39 247 112 64 71 396 282 +114 288 4 6 9 13
11 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 39 254 104 55 95 350 315 +35 263 0 0 3 9
12 England Chelsea 19 201 104 53 44 342 181 +161 261 2 3 8 12
13 Italy Inter Milan 25 213 102 57 54 300 211 +89 261 3 6 9 13
14 England Arsenal 22 211 106 45 60 351 226 +125 257 0 1 2 8
15 Scotland Celtic 38 228 102 40 86 342 285 +57 244 1 2 4 7
16 Spain Atlético Madrid 19 170 82 44 44 249 165 +84 208 0 3 6 12
17 Germany Borussia Dortmund 22 180 86 36 58 302 223 +79 208 1 2 5 10
18 Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 31 199 74 49 76 272 256 +16 197 1 1 3 8
19 France Paris Saint-Germain 17 153 82 29 42 302 179 +123 193 0 1 4 8
20 Belgium Anderlecht 34 200 70 44 86 282 320 –38 184 0 0 2 9
21 England Manchester City 14 129 74 26 29 273 144 +129 174 1 2 4 8
22 Serbia Red Star Belgrade 29 157 70 34 53 285 218 +67 174 1 1 4 9
23 Scotland Rangers 33 177 65 43 69 248 257 –9 173 0 0 2 6
24 Turkey Galatasaray 28 189 63 46 80 237 297 –60 172 0 0 1 5
25 Greece Olympiacos 35 186 66 36 84 222 284 –62 168 0 0 0 1

Number of participating clubs of the Champions League era (from 1992–present)[edit]

A total of 149 clubs from 34 national associations have played in or qualified for the Champions League group stage. Season in bold represents teams qualified for the knockout phase that season. Between 1999–2000 and 2002–03, qualification is considered from the second group stage. Starting from the 2024–25 season with the introduction of a league phase, the top eight are considered to be qualified as well as the eight play-off winners.

Nation No. Clubs Seasons
Germany Germany (15) 27 Bayern Munich 1994–95, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
18 Borussia Dortmund 1995–96, 1996–97, 1997–98, 1999–2000, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
14 Bayer Leverkusen 1997–98, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2004–05, 2011–12, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2019–20, 2022–23, 2024–25
8 Schalke 04 2001–02, 2005–06, 2007–08, 2010–11, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2018–19
7 Werder Bremen 1993–94, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2010–11
6 RB Leipzig 2017–18, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
3 VfB Stuttgart 2003–04, 2007–08, 2009–10
3 Borussia Mönchengladbach 2015–16, 2016–17, 2020–21
3 VfL Wolfsburg 2009–10, 2015–16, 2021–22
2 Hamburger SV 2000–01, 2006–07
1 Kaiserslautern 1998–99
1 Hertha BSC 1999–2000
1 TSG Hoffenheim 2018–19
1 Eintracht Frankfurt 2022–23
1 Union Berlin 2023–24
Spain Spain (13) 29 Real Madrid 1995–96, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24, 2024–25
28 Barcelona 1993–94, 1994–95, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
14 Atlético Madrid 1996–97, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
12 Valencia 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2002–03, 2004–05, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2015–16, 2018–19, 2019–20
9 Sevilla 2007–08, 2009–10, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
5 Deportivo La Coruña 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05
4 Villarreal 2005–06, 2008–09, 2011–12, 2021–22
3 Real Sociedad 2003–04, 2013–14, 2023–24
2 Athletic Bilbao 1998–99, 2014–15
1 Mallorca 2001–02
1 Celta Vigo 2003–04
1 Real Betis 2005–06
1 Málaga 2012–13
France France (11) 17 Paris Saint-Germain 1994–95, 1997–98, 2000–01, 2004–05, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24, 2024–25
16 Lyon 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2018–19, 2019–20
11 Marseille 1992–93, 1999–2000, 2003–04, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2013–14, 2020–21, 2022–23
9 Monaco 1993–94, 1997–98, 2000–01, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2014–15, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19
7 Lille 2001–02, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2019–20, 2021–22
4 Bordeaux 1999–2000, 2006–07, 2008–09, 2009–10
3 Auxerre 1996–97, 2002–03, 2010–11
3 Lens 1998–99, 2002–03, 2023–24
2 Nantes 1995–96, 2001–02
1 Montpellier 2012–13
1 Rennes 2020–21
England England (10) 25 Manchester United 1994–95, 1996–97, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2015–16, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2023–24
20 Arsenal 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2023–24
19 Chelsea 1999–2000, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2017–18, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23
15 Liverpool 2001–02, 2002–03, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2014–15, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23
13 Manchester City 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
6 Tottenham Hotspur 2010–11, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2022–23
3 Newcastle United 1997–98, 2002–03, 2023–24
1 Blackburn Rovers 1995–96
1 Leeds United 2000–01
1 Leicester City 2016–17
Italy Italy (10) 23 Juventus 1995–96, 1996–97, 1997–98, 1998–99, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23
20 Milan 1992–93, 1993–94, 1994–95, 1996–97, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
18 Inter Milan 1998–99, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24, 2024–25
11 Roma 2001–02, 2002–03, 2004–05, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2010–11, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2017–18, 2018–19
8 Napoli 2011–12, 2013–14, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2022–23, 2023–24
7 Lazio 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2003–04, 2007–08, 2020–21, 2023–24
3 Fiorentina 1999–2000, 2008–09, 2009–10
3 Atalanta 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22
1 Parma 1997–98
1 Udinese 2005–06
Netherlands Netherlands (7) 18 Ajax 1994–95, 1995–96, 1996–97, 1998–99, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23
18 PSV Eindhoven 1992–93, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2018–19, 2023–24, 2024–25
6 Feyenoord 1997–98, 1999–2000, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2017–18, 2023–24
1 Willem II 1999–2000
1 Heerenveen 2000–01
1 AZ 2009–10
1 Twente 2010–11
Russia Russia (7) 12 Spartak Moscow 1993–94, 1994–95, 1995–96, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2006–07, 2010–11, 2012–13, 2017–18
12 CSKA Moscow 1992–93, 2004–05, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2009–10, 2011–12, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19
9 Zenit Saint Petersburg 2008–09, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22
6 Lokomotiv Moscow 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21
2 Rubin Kazan 2009–10, 2010–11
1 Rostov 2016–17
1 Krasnodar 2020–21
Belgium Belgium (7) 12 Anderlecht 1993–94, 1994–95, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2017–18
10 Club Brugge 1992–93, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2005–06, 2016–17, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23
3 Genk 2002–03, 2011–12, 2019–20
1 Lierse 1997–98
1 Standard Liège 2009–10
1 Gent 2015–16
1 Antwerp 2023–24
Turkey Turkey (6) 17 Galatasaray 1993–94, 1994–95, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2006–07, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2023–24
8 Beşiktaş 1997–98, 2000–01, 2003–04, 2007–08, 2009–10, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2021–22
6 Fenerbahçe 1996–97, 2001–02, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2007–08, 2008–09
1 Bursaspor 2010–11
1 Trabzonspor 2011–12
1 İstanbul Başakşehir 2020–21
Portugal Portugal (5) 27 Porto 1992–93, 1993–94, 1995–96, 1996–97, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2001–02, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
18 Benfica 1994–95, 1998–99, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
10 Sporting CP 1997–98, 2000–01, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2014–15, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2021–22, 2022–23
3 Braga 2010–11, 2012–13, 2023–24
2 Boavista 1999–2000, 2001–02
Switzerland Switzerland (5) 8 Basel 2002–03, 2008–09, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2016–17, 2017–18
3 Young Boys 2018–19, 2021–22, 2023–24
2 Grasshopper 1995–96, 1996–97
1 Thun 2005–06
1 Zürich 2009–10
Denmark Denmark (5) 6 Copenhagen 2006–07, 2010–11, 2013–14, 2016–17, 2022–23, 2023–24
2 Aalborg 1995–96, 2008–09
1 Brøndby 1998–99
1 Nordsjælland 2012–13
1 Midtjylland 2020–21
Romania Romania (5) 4 FCSB 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2013–14
3 Steaua București 1994–95, 1995–96, 1996–97
3 CFR Cluj 2008–09, 2010–11, 2012–13
1 Unirea Urziceni 2009–10
1 Oțelul Galați 2011–12
Austria Austria (4) 6 Red Bull Salzburg 1994–95, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
3 Sturm Graz 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01
2 Rapid Wien 1996–97, 2005–06
1 Austria Wien 2013–14
Sweden Sweden (4) 4 IFK Göteborg 1992–93, 1994–95, 1996–97, 1997–98
3 Malmö FF 2014–15, 2015–16, 2021–22
1 AIK 1999–2000
1 Helsingborg 2000–01
Greece Greece (3) 20 Olympiacos 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2009–10, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2017–18, 2019–20, 2020–21
9 Panathinaikos 1995–96, 1998–99, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2008–09, 2010–11
5 AEK Athens 1994–95, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2006–07, 2018–19
Czech Republic Czech Republic (3) 7 Sparta Prague 1997–98, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06
4 Viktoria Plzeň 2011–12, 2013–14, 2018–19, 2022–23
2 Slavia Prague 2007–08, 2019–20
Israel Israel (3) 3 Maccabi Haifa 2002–03, 2009–10, 2022–23
2 Maccabi Tel Aviv 2004–05, 2015–16
1 Hapoel Tel Aviv 2010–11
Slovakia Slovakia (3) 1 Košice 1997–98
1 Petržalka 2005–06
1 Žilina 2010–11
Ukraine Ukraine (2) 18 Dynamo Kyiv 1994–95, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2012–13, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2020–21, 2021–22
18 Shakhtar Donetsk 2000–01, 2004–05, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, 2022–23, 2023–24
Scotland Scotland (2) 12 Celtic 2001–02, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2022–23, 2023–24
11 Rangers 1992–93, 1995–96, 1996–97, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2003–04, 2005–06, 2007–08, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2022–23
Norway Norway (2) 11 Rosenborg 1995–96, 1996–97, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2007–08
1 Molde 1999–2000
Croatia Croatia (2) 8 Dinamo Zagreb 1998–99, 1999–2000, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2019–20, 2022–23
1 Hajduk Split 1994–95
Cyprus Cyprus (2) 4 APOEL 2009–10, 2011–12, 2014–15, 2017–18
1 Anorthosis 2008–09
Serbia Serbia (2) 3 Red Star Belgrade 2018–19, 2019–20, 2023–24
2 Partizan 2003–04, 2010–11
Poland Poland (2) 2 Legia Warsaw 1995–96, 2016–17
1 Widzew Łódź 1996–97
Bulgaria Bulgaria (2) 2 Ludogorets Razgrad 2014–15, 2016–17
1 Levski Sofia 2006–07
Hungary Hungary (2) 2 Ferencváros 1995–96, 2020–21
1 Debrecen 2009–10
Belarus Belarus (1) 5 BATE Borisov 2008–09, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2014–15, 2015–16
Slovenia Slovenia (1) 3 Maribor 1999–2000, 2014–15, 2017–18
Finland Finland (1) 1 HJK 1998–99
Kazakhstan Kazakhstan (1) 1 Astana 2015–16
Azerbaijan Azerbaijan (1) 1 Qarabağ 2017–18
Moldova Moldova (1) 1 Sheriff Tiraspol 2021–22


European Cup group stage participants (only one season was played in this format)

1991–92:

Goals[edit]

Host of the finals[edit]

  • The city that has hosted the final the most times is London, doing so on seven occasions. Of these, five have been played at the original Wembley Stadium and twice at the new Wembley Stadium. Paris come joint second, having hosted six finals.
  • The nation that has hosted the most finals is Italy, with nine (Milan and Rome four times each and Bari once). England (London seven times and Manchester once), Spain (Madrid five times, Barcelona twice and Sevilla once) and Germany (Munich four times, Stuttgart twice, Berlin and Gelsenkirchen once each) comes second with eight each.
  • The original Wembley Stadium has a record for the stadium that has hosted the most final matches, with five times (1963, 1968, 1971, 1978 and 1992). Santiago Bernabéu, Heysel Stadium, San Siro and Stadio Olimpico comes second with four times each.
  • The nation that has hosted the finals with most different stadiums is Germany, with five stadiums (Neckarstadion, Olympiastadion (Munich), Arena AufSchalke, Allianz Arena and Olympiastadion (Berlin)). Spain comes second, with four stadiums (Santiago Bernabéu, Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán, Camp Nou and Metropolitano Stadium).
  • London, Munich, Lisbon, Madrid and Paris are the cities that hosted the final with most different stadiums, with two stadiums each.

Clubs[edit]

By semi-final appearances[edit]

Year in bold: team was finalist in that year
Team No. Years
Spain Real Madrid 33 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1973, 1976, 1980, 1981, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024
Germany Bayern Munich 21 1974, 1975, 1976, 1981, 1982, 1987, 1990, 1991, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018, 2020, 2024
Spain Barcelona 17 1960, 1961, 1975, 1986, 1992, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2019
Italy Milan 14 1956, 1958, 1963, 1969, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2023
England Manchester United 12 1957, 1958, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011
England Liverpool 12 1965, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1984, 1985, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2018, 2019, 2022
Italy Juventus 12 1968, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1985, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2015, 2017
Italy Inter Milan 9 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1972, 1981, 2003, 2010, 2023
Netherlands Ajax 9 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1980, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2019
Portugal Benfica 8 1961, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1968, 1972, 1988, 1990
England Chelsea 8 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2014, 2021
Spain Atlético Madrid 6 1959, 1971, 1974, 2014, 2016, 2017
Germany Borussia Dortmund 5 1964, 1997, 1998, 2013, 2024
Serbia Red Star Belgrade 4 1957, 1971, 1991, 1992
Scotland Celtic 4 1967, 1970, 1972, 1974
France Monaco 4 1994, 1998, 2004, 2017
France Paris Saint-Germain 4 1995, 2020, 2021, 2024
England Manchester City 4 2016, 2021, 2022, 2023
Germany Hamburger SV 3 1961, 1980, 1983
England Leeds United 3 1970, 1975, 2001
Greece Panathinaikos 3 1971, 1985, 1996
Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 3 1976, 1988, 2005
Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 3 1977, 1987, 1999
Romania Steaua București 3 1986, 1988, 1989
Portugal Porto 3 1987, 1994, 2004
France Marseille 3 1990, 1991, 1993
France Reims 2 1956, 1959
Scotland Rangers 2 1960, 1993
England Tottenham Hotspur 2 1962, 2019
Netherlands Feyenoord 2 1963, 1970
Switzerland Zürich 2 1964, 1977
Bulgaria CSKA Sofia 2 1967, 1982
France Saint-Étienne 2 1975, 1976
Germany Borussia Mönchengladbach 2 1977, 1978
England Nottingham Forest 2 1979, 1980
Belgium Anderlecht 2 1982, 1986
Italy Roma 2 1984, 2018
Sweden IFK Göteborg 2 1986, 1993
Spain Valencia 2 2000, 2001
England Arsenal 2 2006, 2009
Spain Villarreal 2 2006, 2022
France Lyon 2 2010, 2020
Scotland Hibernian 1 1956
Italy Fiorentina 1 1957
Hungary Vasas 1 1958
Switzerland Young Boys 1 1959
Germany Eintracht Frankfurt 1 1960
Austria Rapid Wien 1 1961
Belgium Standard Liège 1 1962
Scotland Dundee 1 1963
Hungary Győri ETO 1 1965
Serbia Partizan 1 1966
Czech Republic Dukla Prague 1 1967
Slovakia Spartak Trnava 1 1969
Poland Legia Warsaw 1 1970
England Derby County 1 1973
Hungary Újpest 1 1974
Belgium Club Brugge 1 1978
Austria Austria Wien 1 1979
Germany 1. FC Köln 1 1979
Sweden Malmö FF 1 1979
England Aston Villa 1 1982
Spain Real Sociedad 1 1983
Poland Widzew Łódź 1 1983
Romania Dinamo București 1 1984
Scotland Dundee United 1 1984
France Bordeaux 1 1985
Turkey Galatasaray 1 1989
Russia Spartak Moscow 1 1991
Czech Republic Sparta Prague 1 1992
Italy Sampdoria 1 1992
France Nantes 1 1996
Germany Bayer Leverkusen 1 2002
Spain Deportivo La Coruña 1 2004
Germany Schalke 04 1 2011
Germany RB Leipzig 1 2020
By nation
Nation Won Lost Total Different clubs
 Spain 29 30 59 7
 England 25 20 45 10
 Italy 29 10 39 6
 Germany 18 16 34 9
 France 7 11 18 8
 Netherlands 8 6 14 3
 Portugal 9 2 11 2
 Scotland 2 7 9 5
 Serbia 2 3 5 2
 Romania 2 2 4 2
 Belgium 1 3 4 3
 Greece 1 2 3 1
 Sweden 1 2 3 2
 Hungary 0 3 3 3
 Switzerland 0 3 3 2
 Ukraine 0 3 3 1
 Austria 0 2 2 2
 Bulgaria 0 2 2 1
 Czech Republic 0 2 2 2
 Poland 0 2 2 2
 Russia 0 1 1 1
 Slovakia 0 1 1 1
 Turkey 0 1 1 1

Note: In the 1992 and 1993 seasons there were no semi-finals as the finalists qualified via a group stage. The winners (Sampdoria and Barcelona in 1992, Marseille and Milan in 1993) and runners-up (Red Star Belgrade and Sparta Prague in 1992, Rangers and IFK Göteborg in 1993) of the two groups are marked as semi-finalists in the table.

Unbeaten sides[edit]

Final success rate[edit]

Statue of Brian Clough, Nottingham Forest manager who won the European Cup in 1979 and 1980

Consecutive appearances[edit]

Winning other trophies[edit]

Three silver trophies on blue plinths in a glass display case.
Manchester United won a treble in 1999: the Premier League, Champions League and FA Cup (left to right); the English club also won the 1999 Intercontinental Cup.

See also Treble (association football) and List of association football teams to have won four or more trophies in one season.

Best debuts[edit]

Five clubs managed to win the European Cup on their debut:

Three clubs won the Champions League on their debut:[8]

Biggest wins[edit]

Biggest two leg wins[edit]

Deciding drawn ties[edit]

Play-offs[edit]

Coin toss[edit]

  • The first coin toss occurred in 1957–58, with Wismut Karl Marx Stadt beating Gwardia Warsaw after their play-off was abandoned after 100 minutes due to floodlight power failure.
  • Zürich won a coin toss against Galatasaray in 1963–64 after their play-off match ended 2–2. This was the first time this rule was used for a draw played to completion.
  • The last season to use a coin toss was 1969–70, with Galatasaray beating Spartak Trnava and Celtic beating Benfica, both in the second round. Celtic later progressed to the final.
  • A total of seven European Cup ties were decided by a coin toss, with Galatasaray being the only team to be involved twice, winning one and losing one.

Away goals[edit]

  • The away goals rule was introduced in 1967–68, with Valur beating Jeunesse Esch 4–4 (1–1 at home, 3–3 away) and Benfica beating Glentoran 1–1 (1–1 away, 0–0 at home), both in the first round. Benfica later progressed to the final.
  • In 2002–03, Milan and Inter met in the semi-finals. Sharing the same stadium (San Siro), they drew 0–0 in the first leg and 1–1 in the second. However, Milan were the designated away side in the latter, and thus became the only team to win on "away" goals without having scored a goal away from their own stadium.
  • The quarter-final of the 2020–21 season between previous year's finalists Bayern Munich and Paris Saint-Germain was the last to be decided by the away goals rule before its abolition from the following season.
  • Milan, Paris Saint-Germain and Porto are the only teams to have advanced on the away goals rule after extra time:
    • In the semi-finals against Bayern Munich in 1989–90, Milan won 1–0 at home and were 0–1 down after 90 minutes in the second leg. Both teams scored one goal each in extra time, giving Milan the victory on away goals.
    • In the round of 16 against Chelsea in 2014–15, Paris Saint-Germain drew 1–1 both home and away. Both teams scored one goal each in the extra time period played in London, giving Paris Saint-Germain the victory on away goals.
    • In the round of 16 against Juventus in 2020–21 (the last season the away goals rule was used), Porto won 2–1 at home and were 1–2 down after 90 minutes in the second leg. Both teams scored one goal each in the extra time period played in Turin, giving Porto the victory on away goals.

Penalty shoot-out[edit]

Alan Kennedy scored the decisive penalty kick in the 1984 final.

Extra time[edit]

Most goals in a match[edit]

Highest scoring draws[edit]

More European Cups than domestic league titles[edit]

  • Nottingham Forest are the only club to have won the European Cup more times (twice) than they have won their own domestic league (once). Forest won the Football League in 1978, before winning the European Cup in 1979 and defending it in 1980. Nottingham Forest are also the only previous winners of the European Cup to be later relegated to the third tier of their national league (in 2005).

Not winning the domestic league[edit]

Comebacks[edit]

Group stage[edit]

Zinedine Zidane and Juventus drew their first five games in 1998–99.

Two-leg knockout matches[edit]

  • Only one team has lost the first leg of a knockout match by four goals, but still managed to qualify for the next round:
  • One additional team was trailing by four goals at some point in a knockout match, but still managed to qualify for the next round:
    • Tottenham Hotspur were trailing 4–0 to Górnik Zabrze after 48 minutes of the first leg in the 1961–62 preliminary round, but managed to finish the game down 4–2 and won 8–1 in the second leg to advance 10–5 on aggregate
  • Seventeen teams have lost the first leg of a knockout match by three goals, but still managed to qualify for the next round:
  • Another 18 teams were trailing by three goals at some point in a knockout match, but still managed to qualify for the next round:
    • Manchester United were trailing 0–3 to Athletic Bilbao after 43 minutes of the first leg in the quarter-final 1956–57, and then 2–5 after 78 minutes, but managed to finish the game 3–5 and won 3–0 in the second leg and 6–5 on aggregate.
    • CCA București lost 2–4 to Borussia Dortmund in the first round 1957–58 and were trailing 0–1 (2–5 on aggregate) after 12 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 3–1 to qualify for the next round on away goals.
    • Hamburg were trailing 0–3 to Burnley after 74 minutes of the first leg in the quarter-final 1960–61, but managed to finish the game 1–3 and won 4–1 in the second leg and 5–4 on aggregate.
    • Spartak Trnava were trailing 0–3 to Steaua București after 51 minutes of the first leg in the first round 1968–69, but managed to finish the game 1–3 and won 4–0 in the second leg and 5–3 on aggregate.
    • Austria Wien were trailing 0–3 to Levski-Spartak after 62 minutes of the first leg in the preliminary round 1970–71, but managed to finish the game 1–3 and won 3–0 in the second leg and 4–3 on aggregate.
    • Basel were trailing 0–3 to Spartak Moscow after 76 minutes of the first leg in the first round 1970–71, but managed to finish the game 2–3 and won 2–1 in the second leg to qualify on away goals.
    • Anderlecht were trailing 0–3 to Slovan Bratislava after 44 minutes, and 1–4 after 63 minutes of the first leg in the preliminary round 1974–75, but managed to finish the game 2–4 and won 3–1 in the second leg to qualify on away goals.
    • Saint-Étienne were trailing 0–3 to Ruch Chorzów after 46 minutes of the first leg in the quarter-final 1974–75, but managed to finish the game 2–3 and won 2–0 in the second leg and 4–3 on aggregate.
    • Borussia Mönchengladbach were trailing 0–3 to Wacker Innsbruck after 27 minutes of the first leg in the quarter-final 1977–78, but managed to finish the game 1–3 and won 2–0 in the second leg to qualify on away goals.
    • Banik Ostrava were trailing 0–3 to Ferencváros after 47 minutes of the first leg in the first round 1981–82, but managed to finish the game 2–3 and won 3–0 in the second leg and 5–3 on aggregate.
    • Bayern Munich were trailing 0–3 to CSKA Sofia after 18 minutes of the first leg in the semi-final 1981–82, but managed to finish the game 3–4 and won 4–0 in the second leg and 7–4 on aggregate.
    • Real Madrid were trailing 0–3 to Red Star Belgrade after 39 minutes of the first leg in the quarter-final 1986–87, but managed to finish the game 2–4 and won 2–0 in the second leg to qualify on away goals.
    • Real Madrid were trailing 0–3 to Bayern Munich after 47 minutes of the first leg in the quarter-final 1987–88, but managed to finish the game 2–3 and won 2–0 in the second leg and 4–3 on aggregate.
    • Sparta Prague were trailing 0–3 to Marseille after 60 minutes of the first leg in the second round 1991–92, but managed to finish the game 2–3 and won 2–1 in the second leg to qualify on away goals.
    • Cork City were trailing 0–3 to Cwmbrân Town after 27 minutes of the first leg in the preliminary round 1993–94, but managed to finish the game 2–3 and won 2–1 in the second leg to qualify on away goals.
    • Monaco were trailing 1–4 to Real Madrid after 81 minutes of the first leg in the quarter-final 2003–04, managed to finish the game 2–4, were trailing 0–1 (2–5 on aggregate) after 36 minutes of the second leg, but won 3–1 to qualify on away goals.
    • Tottenham Hotspur were trailing 0–3 to Young Boys after 28 minutes of the first leg in the play-off round 2010–11, but managed to finish the game 2–3 and won 4–0 in the second leg and 6–3 on aggregate.
    • Tottenham Hotspur were trailing 0–2 (0–3 on agg.) to Ajax after 35 minutes of the second leg in the semi-final 2018–19, but managed to win the game 3–2 to qualify on away goals after a 3–3 aggregate score.
  • Four teams lost the first leg of a knockout match by three goals, overcame the deficit in the second leg, but still did not qualify for the next round:
    • Rapid Wien lost 4–1 to Milan in the preliminary round 1957–58, won 5–2 in the second leg, but lost 4–2 in the play-off.
    • Górnik Zabrze lost 4–1 to Dukla Prague in the preliminary round 1964–65, won 3–0 in the second leg, but lost the coin toss after the play-off ended 0–0.
    • Benfica lost 3–0 to Celtic in the second round 1969–70, won 3–0 in the second leg, but lost the coin toss.
    • Juventus lost their home leg of the 2017–18 quarter-finals to Real Madrid 0–3, but then proceeded to score three unanswered goals in the away game to put the aggregate score at 3–3 only to concede a last minute penalty and lose 3–4 on aggregate.
  • Two teams were trailing by three goals at some point in a knockout match, overcame the deficit, but still did not qualify for the next round:
    • Gothenburg were trailing 0–3 to Sparta Rotterdam after 48 minutes of the first leg in the round of 16 1959–60, but managed to finish the game 1–3 and won 3–1 in the second leg, only to lose 1–3 in the playoff.
    • Red Star Belgrade lost 1–3 to Rangers in the preliminary round 1964–65 and were trailing 0–1 (1–4 on aggregate) after 40 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 4–2, only to lose 1–3 in the playoff.
  • Only one team has lost the first leg of a knockout match at home by two goals, but still managed to qualify for the next round:
  • On eight occasions, a team lost the first leg away from home 1–0 and was trailing 1–0 in the second leg at home, but managed to score the three goals required under the away goals rule and qualify for the next round (Or two goals and qualify on penalties shoot-out after removing the away goals rule in 2021–22):
    • Celtic lost 1–0 away to Partizani in the 1979–80 first round and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate, with Partizani also having an away goal) after 15 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 4–1 and advance 4–2 on aggregate
    • AEK Athens lost 1–0 away to Dynamo Dresden in the 1989–90 first round and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate, with Dresden also having an away goal) after 10 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 5–3 and advance 5–4 on aggregate
    • PSV Eindhoven lost 1–0 away to Steaua București in the 1989–90 second round and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate, with Steaua also having an away goal) after 17 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 5–1 and advance 5–2 on aggregate
    • Barcelona lost 1–0 away to Panathinaikos in the 2001–02 quarter-finals and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate, with Panathinaikos also having an away goal) after eight minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 3–1 and advance 3–2 on aggregate
    • Shakhtar Donetsk lost 1–0 away to Red Bull Salzburg in the 2007–08 third qualifying round and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate, with Salzburg also having an away goal) after five minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 3–1 and advance 3–2 on aggregate
    • BATE Borisov lost 1–0 away to Debrecen in the 2014–15 third qualifying round and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate, with Debrecen also having an away goal) after 20 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 3–1 and advance 3–2 on aggregate
    • Real Madrid lost 1–0 away to Paris Saint-Germain in the 2021–22 round of 16 and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate) after 39 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 3–1 and advance 3–2 on aggregate
    • Atlético Madrid lost 1–0 away to Inter Milan in the 2023–24 round of 16 and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate) after 33 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 2–1 and qualify on penalties shoot-out
  • On one occasion, a team lost the first leg at home by one goal and was trailing 0–1 in the second leg away from home, but managed to score two or more goals afterwards and progressed to the next round:
    • Paris Saint-Germain lost 2–3 home to Barcelona in the 2023–24 quarter-finals and were trailing 1–0 (2–0 on aggregate) after 12 minutes of the second leg, but managed to win the game 1–4 and advance 4–6 on aggregate

Single game[edit]

  • No team has ever managed to escape a loss in a single game after trailing by four or more goals.
  • Teams have managed to win a game after trailing by three goals on three occasions:
  • Teams have managed to tie a game after trailing by three goals on twelve occasions:
    • Vörös Lobogó were trailing 4–1 to Reims after 52 minutes in the second leg of the 1955–56 quarter-finals, but managed to finish the game 4–4. However, Reims still advanced after winning 8–6 on aggregate
    • Red Star Belgrade were trailing 3–0 to Manchester United after 31 minutes in the second leg of the 1957–58 quarter-finals, but managed to finish the game 3–3. However, Manchester United still advanced after winning 5–4 on aggregate
    • Panathinaikos were trailing 3–0 to Linfield after 26 minutes in the second leg of the 1984–85 second round, but managed to finish the game 3–3 and advance 5–4 on aggregate
    • Liverpool were trailing 3–0 to Basel after 29 minutes in the 2002–03 first group stage, but managed to finish the game 3–3
    • Liverpool were trailing 3–0 to Milan after 44 minutes in the 2005 final, but managed to finish the game 3–3, and win the final 3–2 on penalties
    • Maccabi Tel Aviv were trailing 3–0 to Basel after 32 minutes in the second leg of the 2013–14 third qualifying round, but managed to finish the game 3–3. However, Basel still advanced after winning 4–3 on aggregate
    • Anderlecht were trailing 3–0 to Arsenal after 58 minutes in the 2014–15 group stage, but managed to finish the game 3–3
    • Molde were trailing 3–0 to Dinamo Zagreb after 22 minutes in the second leg of the 2015–16 third qualifying round, but managed to finish the game 3–3. However, Dinamo Zagreb still advanced on away goals
    • Beşiktaş were trailing 3–0 to Benfica after 31 minutes in the 2016–17 group stage, but managed to finish the game 3–3
    • Sevilla were trailing 3–0 to Liverpool after 30 minutes in the 2017–18 group stage, but managed to finish the game 3–3
    • Chelsea were trailing 4–1 to Ajax after 55 minutes in the 2019–20 group stage, but managed to finish the game 4–4
    • Inter Milan were trailing 3–0 to Benfica after 34 minutes in the 2023–24 group stage, but managed to finish the game 3–3

Defence[edit]

Jens Lehmann in Arsenal colours, 2007
Manuel Almunia in Arsenal regalia, 2007
Arsenal goalkeepers Jens Lehmann and Manuel Almunia racked up ten consecutive clean sheets en route to the 2006 final.
  • Arsenal hold the record for the most consecutive clean sheets in the competition, with ten during the 2005–06 season. They did not concede a goal for 995 minutes between September 2005 and May 2006.[19] The run started after Markus Rosenberg's goal for Ajax in the 71st minute of matchday 2 of the group stage, continued with four group stage games and six games in the knockout rounds, and ended with Samuel Eto'o's goal for Barcelona after 76 minutes in the final. These minutes were split between two goalkeepers: Jens Lehmann (648 minutes) and Manuel Almunia (347 minutes).
  • Aston Villa (in 9 matches in 1981–82) and Milan (in 12 matches in 1993–94) hold the record for the fewest goals conceded by European Cup-winning team, conceding only two goals. In addition, Milan achieved the lowest-ever goals conceded-per-game ratio for Champions League-winning in the history of the competition (0.16).
  • Real Madrid hold the record for the most goals conceded by a Champions League-winning team, conceding 23 goals in 17 matches in 1999–2000.
  • Benfica achieved the highest-ever goals conceded-per-game ratio for Champions League-winning in the history of the competition (1.57), the club conceded 11 goals in 7 matches in 1961–62.
  • Benfica hold the record for the fewest goals conceded by a finalists, conceding only one goal in 1987–88 season.
  • Manchester United holds the record for the longest run without conceding from the start of a campaign, with 481 minutes in the 2010–11 season. The run ended with Pablo Hernández's goal for Valencia after 32 minutes on matchday 6 of the group stage.
    • That season, the club also became the only side to play six away games in a single Champions League campaign without conceding a goal.

Goalscoring records[edit]

  • Barcelona holds the record for most goals in a season, with the club scoring 45 goals in 16 matches in 1999–2000. Including qualifying stages, Liverpool holds this feat, scoring 47 goals in 15 matches in 2017–18.
  • Bayern Munich hold the record for most goals by a Champions League-winning side, scoring 43 goals in 11 matches in 2019–20.
  • Real Madrid hold the record for highest-ever goal-per-game ratio by a Champions League-winning side (4.4), scoring 31 goals in 7 matches in 1959–60.
  • PSV Eindhoven hold the record for fewest goals by a Champions League-winning, scoring 9 goals in 9 matches in 1987–88. Additionally, the club achieved the lowest-ever goal-per-game ratio in the history of the competition (1).
  • Real Madrid holds the record for a title-winning team that has the most players who scored at least one goal in one season, with fourteen players in the 2001–02 season.
  • Borussia Mönchengladbach holds the record for the team with the most players to have scored in a single match, with eight players against EPA Larnaca on 22 September 1970.
  • Real Madrid is the first club to reach the 1000th goal in the history of the competition, doing so when Karim Benzema scored the first goal in the 14th minute in his team's 2–1 victory against Shakhtar Donetsk in the fourth matchday of the group stage in the 2021–22 season.[20]

Meetings[edit]

Penalties[edit]

Defending the trophy[edit]

Disciplinary[edit]

  • Juventus hold the record for the most red cards, with 28.
  • The match between Bayern Munich and Juventus in the second leg of the round of 16 in the 2015–16 season had a record for most yellow cards, with 12.

Own goals[edit]

  • Real Madrid hold the record for most own goals scored, with 12.
  • The match between Astana and Galatasaray in the 2015–16 group stage holds the record for the most own goals scored, with 3.

Finals[edit]

Nationalities[edit]

Countries[edit]

Cities[edit]

Specific group stage records[edit]

Six wins[edit]

Fabio Capello's Milan became the first side to win all six group stage matches in the 1992–93 season.

Nine clubs have won all six of their games in a group stage, on thirteen occasions. Real Madrid and Bayern Munich have done so the most, on three occasions, and the latter are also the only club to have two consecutive six-win group stages.

Six draws[edit]

Only one club has drawn all six of their games in a group stage:

Six losses[edit]

In the history of the Champions League, the following 23 clubs have lost all six group stage matches, Dinamo Zagreb is the only team to do it twice:

  • Košice (1997–98) ended Group B conceding thirteen goals and scoring only twice, with a goal difference of –11.
  • Fenerbahçe (2001–02, first group stage) ended Group F conceding twelve goals and scoring three, with a goal difference of –9.
  • Spartak Moscow (2002–03, first group stage) ended Group B conceding eighteen goals and scoring only once, with a goal difference of –17.
  • Bayer Leverkusen (2002–03, second group stage) ended Group A conceding fifteen goals and scoring five, with a goal difference of –10. This was the only time that a club lost all matches in the second group stage. It was also the first time that two clubs lost six group stage matches in the same season. Leverkusen had reached the final in the previous season.
  • Anderlecht (2004–05) ended Group G conceding seventeen goals and scoring four, with a goal difference of –13.
  • Rapid Wien (2005–06) ended Group A conceding fifteen goals and scoring three, with a goal difference of –12.
  • Levski Sofia (2006–07) ended Group A conceding seventeen goals and scoring only once, with a goal difference of –16. This has been the club's only appearance in the group stage to date.
  • Dynamo Kyiv (2007–08) ended Group F conceding nineteen goals and scoring four, with a goal difference of –15.
  • Maccabi Haifa (2009–10) was the first club to lose all of their group stage matches without scoring a goal. In what was only their second appearance in the competition, they lost 3–0 to Bayern Munich in their first Group A game, and then lost five consecutive games by a score of 1–0, ending the group stage with a goal difference of –8. Although Deportivo La Coruña also scored no goals in Group A in 2004–05, they still collected two points as they twice drew 0–0.
  • Debrecen (2009–10) ended Group E conceding nineteen goals and scoring five, with a goal difference of –14.
  • Partizan (2010–11) ended Group H conceding thirteen goals and scoring only twice, with a goal difference of –11.
  • MŠK Žilina (2010–11) ended Group F conceding nineteen goals and scoring three, with a goal difference of –16. This was the second consecutive season that two clubs had lost all six group stage matches.
  • Dinamo Zagreb (2011–12) ended Group D conceding 22 goals and scoring three, with a goal difference of –19.
  • Villarreal (2011–12) ended Group A conceding fourteen goals and scoring only twice, with a goal difference of –12.
  • Oțelul Galați (2011–12) ended Group C conceding eleven goals and scoring three, with a goal difference of –8. This was the first season in which three teams lost all six of their group stage matches, and a third consecutive season in which at least two teams finished with zero points.
  • Marseille (2013–14) ended Group F conceding fourteen goals and scoring five, with a goal difference of –9.
  • Maccabi Tel Aviv (2015–16) ended Group G conceding sixteen goals and scoring only once, with a goal difference of –15. Tel-Aviv's only goal came from a penalty.
  • Club Brugge (2016–17) ended Group G conceding fourteen goals and scoring only twice, with a goal difference of –12.
  • Dinamo Zagreb (2016–17) ended Group H conceding fifteen goals and scoring none, with a goal difference of –15. They became the first club to finish the group stage with zero points on multiple occasions.
  • Benfica (2017–18) ended Group A conceding fourteen goals and scoring only once, with a goal difference of –13. They became the first team from Pot 1 to lose all six group stage matches.
  • AEK Athens (2018–19) ended Group E conceding thirteen goals and scoring only twice, with a goal difference of –11.
  • Beşiktaş (2021–22) ended Group C conceding nineteen goals and scoring only three, with a goal difference of –16.
  • Rangers (2022–23) ended Group A conceding 22 goals and scoring only two, with a goal difference of –20, which constituted the worst goal difference out of all the performances with losses in all six games.
  • Viktoria Plzeň (2022–23) ended Group C conceding 24 goals and scoring five, with a goal difference of –19. This equalled the record for most goals conceded in a group stage.

Three goals in each match[edit]

Advancing past the group stage[edit]

  • Real Madrid hold the record for the most consecutive seasons in which a side have advanced past the group stage, with 27 straight progressions from 1997–98 to 2023–24. They won the title eight times in this period.
  • Barcelona finished top of their group for a record thirteen consecutive seasons from 2007–08 to 2019–20, and in 18 seasons in total.[28]
  • In 2012–13, Chelsea became the first title holders not to qualify from the following season's group stage.
  • Monaco scored the fewest goals (four) to earn eleven points in the group stage in 2014–15. Villarreal won a group with the fewest goals scored (three) in 2005–06, resulting in two wins.

Biggest disparity between group winner and runner-up[edit]

Louis van Gaal's Barcelona won Group H by eleven points in 2002–03.

The biggest points difference between the first- and second-placed teams in a Champions League group phase is eleven points, achieved by four teams:

Most points achieved, yet knocked out[edit]

Most points achieved in the group stage, not winning the group[edit]

Fewest points achieved, yet advanced[edit]

Fewest points achieved, yet qualified to UEFA Cup/UEFA Europa League[edit]

Knocked out on tiebreakers[edit]

Several teams have been knocked out on a tiebreaker, most on the head-to-head criteria:

Knocked out on 3 points for a win rule[edit]

1995–96 was the first tournament in which three points were awarded for a win instead of two. The following teams were knocked out from the group stage, but would have advanced following the old rule:

Other group stage records[edit]

  • Bayern Munich holds the ongoing record for consecutive wins in season-opening fixtures with 20, starting with a 2–1 victory against Celtic in the 2003–04 season, and most recently a 4–3 win against Manchester United in the 2023–24 season.
  • Bayern Munich holds the record for most consecutive wins in the group stage with 17, starting with a 2–0 victory against Lokomotiv Moscow in the 2020–21 season and continuing until a 2–1 win against Galatasaray in the 2023–24 season; the streak ended following a 0–0 draw against Copenhagen in the same campaign.
    • Barcelona holds the record for most consecutive home wins in the group stage with 17, starting with a 4–0 victory against Ajax in the 2013–14 season and continuing until a 2–0 win against Inter Milan in the 2018–19 season; the streak ended following a 1–1 draw against Tottenham Hotspur in the same campaign.
    • Bayern Munich holds the ongoing record for most consecutive away wins in the group stage with 9, starting with a 3–0 victory against Barcelona in the 2021–22 season, and most recently a 1–0 win against Manchester United in the 2023–24 season.
  • Bayern Munich holds the ongoing record for most consecutive undefeated matches in the group stage with 40, starting with a 3–0 victory against Celtic in the 2017–18 season, and most recently a 1–0 win against Manchester United in 2023–24.
    • Barcelona holds the record for most consecutive home undefeated matches in the group stage with 33, starting with a 2–0 victory against Inter Milan in the 2009–10 season and continuing until a 2–1 win against Dynamo Kyiv in the 2020–21 season; the streak ended following a 3–0 defeat against Juventus in the same campaign.
    • Bayern Munich holds the ongoing record for most consecutive away undefeated matches in the group stage with 20, starting with a 2–1 victory against Celtic in the 2017–18 season, and most recently a 1–0 win against Manchester United in the 2023–24 season.
  • Panathinaikos is the only team that has ever played seven matches in the group stage (instead of the usual six). After Panathinaikos lost 1–0 away to Dynamo Kyiv on matchday one of the 1995–96 group stage, the Ukrainian team was expelled from the competition by UEFA following Spanish referee Antonio Jesús López Nieto reporting he received a bribe attempt from the side. To replace Dynamo Kyiv in the group stage, UEFA promoted their qualifying round rivals Aalborg BK, who were allowed to play a replacement fixture against Panathinaikos in between matchdays three and four. Although this took the total number of group matches played by Panathinaikos to seven, their result against Dynamo Kyiv was annulled.

Qualifying from first qualifying round[edit]

Since the addition of a third qualifying round in 1999–2000, eight teams have negotiated all three rounds of qualification and reached the Champions League group phase:

Winning after playing in a qualifying round[edit]

Pep Guardiola coached Barcelona to victory from the qualification round in 2008–09.

Four teams have won the tournament from the third qualification round:

Most knockout tie wins[edit]

Real Madrid holds the record for most knockout tie wins in the competition's history, with 115 overall. Their first knockout tie success came following a 7–0 aggregate win over Servette in the 1955–56 first round, and their most recent victory was a 3–4 penalty-shootout win against Manchester City in the 2023–24 quarter-finals.

Consecutive goalscoring[edit]

Real Madrid and Paris Saint-Germain share the record of consecutive goalscoring in Champions League matches, with both sides scoring at least one goal in 34 successive games. Real Madrid's run started with a 1–1 draw in the second leg of their semi-final tie against Barcelona on 3 May 2011. This run continued into the entirety of the next two seasons, with Madrid scoring in all twelve matches of both their 2011–12 and 2012–13 Champions League campaigns. The club then scored in the first nine games of their 2013–14 campaign (six group stage games, both legs of the round of 16 and the first leg of the quarter-finals), with the run coming to an end following a 2–0 away loss against Borussia Dortmund in the second leg of the quarter-finals on 8 April 2014.

Paris Saint-Germain's run started with a 1–1 group stage draw against Arsenal on 13 September 2016. This streak continued with PSG scoring at least once in all 24 matches played over the course of their 2016–17, 2017–18 and 2018–19 Champions League campaigns (including all six group stage games and both legs of the round of 16). The club then scored in all six group stage games, both legs of the round of 16, and the single-legged quarter-finals and semi-finals of the 2019–20 edition,[29] with their run ending in the final following a 0–1 defeat to Bayern Munich on 23 August 2020.[30]

Consecutive home wins[edit]

Bayern Munich hold the record of 21 consecutive home wins in the European Cup era. The run began with a 2–0 win against Saint-Étienne in the first leg of the 1969–70 first round. The run ended with a 1–1 draw to Liverpool in the second leg of the 1980–81 semi-finals.[31] In the Champions League era, the record stands at 16 games and is also held by Bayern Munich. The run began with a 1–0 win against Manchester City in the first match of the 2014–15 group stage and reached the 16th win after a 5–1 victory over Arsenal in the 2016–17 round of 16, then it ended after a 2–1 loss to Real Madrid in the quarter-finals of that season.[32]

Consecutive away wins[edit]

The most consecutive away wins in the Champions League (not including matches played at neutral venues) is seven, achieved on two occasions. Ajax were the first side to reach this number; their run began with a 2–0 group stage win against Real Madrid at the Santiago Bernabéu on 22 November 1995. They then defeated Borussia Dortmund at the Westfalenstadion in the quarter-finals and Panathinaikos at the Spyridon Louis in the semi-finals. Ajax's run continued the following season, winning all three away group stage matches, against Auxerre, Rangers and Grasshopper. Their record seventh win came on 19 March 1997, after defeating Atlético Madrid 3–2 at the Vicente Calderón after extra time in the quarter-finals. The streak would end in the following round, as Ajax lost 4–1 to Juventus in the semi-finals at the Stadio delle Alpi on 23 April 1997.

Bayern Munich would go on to equal this record nearly two decades later; their run began with a 3–1 round of 16 victory against Arsenal at the Emirates Stadium on 19 February 2013, and continued with wins against Juventus at the Juventus Stadium in the quarter-finals and Barcelona at the Camp Nou in the semi-finals. The streak continued the following season, with group stage away wins over Manchester City, Viktoria Plzeň and CSKA Moscow. The record equaling seventh win was achieved when Bayern again defeated Arsenal at the Emirates Stadium in the round of 16 on 19 February 2014. Their run ended with a 1–1 draw at Old Trafford against Manchester United in the first leg of the quarter-finals on 1 April 2014.[33]

Consecutive wins[edit]

Bayern Munich (2019–20 and 2020–21) holds the record of 15 consecutive wins in the Champions League. Bayern's run started on 18 September 2019 with a 3–0 win against Red Star Belgrade in their first group stage match, after losing 1–3 against Liverpool in the previous season's round of 16. The run continued in their other five group matches and all five knockout matches, as they defeated Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 in the final.[34] Bayern won the next four matches of the following season's group stage, before their streak ended on 1 December 2020 with a 1–1 draw against Atlético Madrid.

Bayern Munich is also the first club to win all of their matches (without needing extra time) in a Champions League season, winning 11 out of 11 in their successful 2019–20 campaign.[35]

Longest home undefeated run[edit]

The record for the longest unbeaten run at home stands at 43 games and is held by Bayern Munich. Bayern Munich's run began with a 2–0 win against Saint-Étienne in the first leg of the 1969–70 first round. The run ended with a 2–1 defeat to Red Star Belgrade in the first leg of the 1990–91 semi-finals. In the Champions League era, the record stands at 38 games and is held by Barcelona. Barcelona's run began with a 4–0 win against Ajax in the first match of the 2013–14 group stage and reached the 38th match in a 2–1 win against Dynamo Kyiv in the 2020–21 group stage, before it ended after a 3–0 loss to Juventus in the final match of the group stage of that season.[36]

Longest away undefeated run[edit]

The record for the longest away unbeaten run stands at 22 games and is held by Bayern Munich. The run began with a 2–1 win against Celtic in the 2017–18 group stage, and reached its 22nd match following Bayern's 1–1 draw away to Red Bull Salzburg in the 2021–22 round of 16. The streak ended in the following round, following Bayern's 1–0 quarter-final defeat at Villarreal. During this run, Bayern defeated Barcelona and Lyon in the 2019–20 quarter-finals and semi-finals respectively, played in Lisbon over a single leg as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. They also defeated Paris Saint-Germain in the 2020 final. These matches, however, were played at a neutral venue, and as such are not classified as away games.

Longest undefeated run[edit]

The record for the longest unbeaten run stands at 25 games and is held by Manchester United. The streak began with a 1–0 away win against Sporting CP in their opening group stage game in 2007–08 and reached a 25th game following their 3–1 away win against Arsenal in the second leg of the 2008–09 semi-finals. The streak then ended with a 2–0 loss to Barcelona in the 2009 final.[8]

Most consecutive draws[edit]

AEK Athens holds the record for the most consecutive draws: 7 draws starting from 17 September 2002 until 17 September 2003.[8]

Most consecutive defeats[edit]

Jeunesse Esch holds the record for the most consecutive defeats in the competition, with 16 straight losses. The streak began with a 2–0 first round loss against Liverpool on 13 October 1973, and continued up to a 4–1 defeat to AGF Aarhus on 16 September 1987. The streak ended when they beat the same team 1–0 two weeks later.[37] In the Champions League era, the record stands at 13 games and is held by Marseille. Marseille's run began with a 2–1 loss to Inter Milan in the round of 16 on 13 March 2012, and continued up to a 2–0 defeat to Porto on 25 November 2020. The streak ended with Marseille's 2–1 win over Olympiacos on 1 December 2020.[8]

Most consecutive games without a win[edit]

FCSB holds the record for the most consecutive Champions League games without a win. They failed to record a victory in 23 matches played in the competition from 26 September 2006 until 11 December 2013,[8] although they did win games in the qualifying rounds during that period. They have not appeared in the group stage since the last of those 23 games.

Players[edit]

Appearances[edit]

All-time top player appearances[edit]

Iker Casillas has made the most appearances in the competition for a goalkeeper.
As of 17 April 2024[38][39]

Players that are still active in Europe are highlighted in boldface.
The table below does not include appearances made in the qualification stage of the competition.

Rank Player Nation Apps Years Club(s) (Apps)
1 Cristiano Ronaldo  Portugal 183 2003–2022 Manchester United (59), Real Madrid (101), Juventus (23)
2 Iker Casillas  Spain 177 1999–2019 Real Madrid (150), Porto (27)
3 Lionel Messi  Argentina 163 2005–2023 Barcelona (149), Paris Saint-Germain (14)
4 Karim Benzema  France 152 2005–2023 Lyon (19), Real Madrid (133)
5 Xavi  Spain 151 1998–2015 Barcelona
6 Thomas Müller  Germany 149 2009– Bayern Munich
7 Toni Kroos  Germany 148 2008– Bayern Munich (41), Real Madrid (107)
8 Sergio Ramos  Spain 142 2005– Real Madrid (129), Paris Saint-Germain (8), Sevilla (5)
Raúl  Spain 1995–2011 Real Madrid (130), Schalke 04 (12)
10 Ryan Giggs  Wales 141 1993–2014 Manchester United

Other records[edit]

Goalscoring[edit]

All-time top scorers[edit]

Cristiano Ronaldo is the all-time top goalscorer in the competition.
As of 17 April 2024[44][45]
A ‡ indicates the player was from the European Cup era.
Players that have taken part in the 2023–24 UEFA Champions League are highlighted in bold.
The table below does not include goals scored in the qualification stage of the competition. Notwithstanding, UEFA's official goalscoring ranking counts Cristiano Ronaldo's tally at 141 goals.[46]
Rank Player Goals Apps Ratio Years Club(s) (Goals/Apps)
1 Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo 140 183 0.77 2003–2022 Manchester United (21/59), Real Madrid (105/101), Juventus (14/23)
2 Argentina Lionel Messi 129 163 0.79 2005–2023 Barcelona (120/149), Paris Saint-Germain (9/14)
3 Poland Robert Lewandowski 94 120 0.78 2011– Borussia Dortmund (17/28), Bayern Munich (69/78), Barcelona (8/14)
4 France Karim Benzema 90 152 0.59 2005–2023 Lyon (12/19), Real Madrid (78/133)
5 Spain Raúl 71 142 0.50 1995–2011 Real Madrid (66/130), Schalke 04 (5/12)
6 Netherlands Ruud van Nistelrooy 56 73 0.77 1998–2009 PSV Eindhoven (8/11), Manchester United (35/43), Real Madrid (13/19)
7 Germany Thomas Müller 54 149 0.36 2009– Bayern Munich
8 France Thierry Henry 50 112 0.45 1997–2012 Monaco (7/9), Arsenal (35/77), Barcelona (8/26)
9 Spain Alfredo Di Stéfano 49 58 0.84 1955–1964 Real Madrid
10 France Kylian Mbappé 48 71 0.68 2016– Monaco (6/9), Paris Saint-Germain (42/62)
Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko 48 100 0.48 1994–2012 Dynamo Kyiv (15/26), Milan (29/59), Chelsea (4/15)
Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimović 48 124 0.39 2001–2021 Ajax (6/19), Juventus (3/19), Inter Milan (6/22), Barcelona (4/10), Milan (9/20), Paris Saint-Germain (20/33), Manchester United (0/1)
Notes

Top scorers by seasons[edit]

Gerd Müller was the first player to become top scorer in four Champions League seasons.

Most goals in a single season[edit]

As of 10 June 2023
Rank Player Season Goals
1 Cristiano Ronaldo 2013–14 17
2 Cristiano Ronaldo 2015–16 16
3 Cristiano Ronaldo 2017–18 15
Robert Lewandowski 2019–20
Karim Benzema 2021–22
6 José Altafini 1962–63 14
Lionel Messi 2011–12
8 Robert Lewandowski 2021–22 13
9 Ferenc Puskás 1959–60 12
Gerd Müller 1972–73
Ruud van Nistelrooy 2002–03
Lionel Messi 2010–11
Mario Gómez 2011–12
Cristiano Ronaldo 2012–13
Cristiano Ronaldo 2016–17
Lionel Messi 2018–19
Erling Haaland 2022–23

Hat-tricks[edit]

Four goals in a match[edit]

Ruud van Nistelrooy scored four goals against Sparta Prague in 2004–05.
Robert Lewandowski scored four goals for Borussia Dortmund against Real Madrid in the semi-finals in 2013. He also scored the fastest four goals in 15 minutes for Bayern Munich against Red Star Belgrade in 2019–20.[54]

The following players have scored four goals in one European Cup/UEFA Champions League match. Only Alfredo Di Stéfano, Ferenc Puskás, Sándor Kocsis, Lionel Messi and Robert Lewandowski managed to do this from the quarter-final stage onwards and Ferenc Puskás is the only footballer to score four goals in a final (1960).

Five goals in a match[edit]

Luiz Adriano scored five goals in Shakhtar Donetsk's 7–0 win against BATE Borisov, including a record four goals in the first-half, in 2014–15.

The following players have managed to score five goals in one European Cup/UEFA Champions League match:

Oldest and youngest[edit]

Fastest goals[edit]

Roy Makaay scored the fastest ever Champions League goal.

First goal[edit]

Other goalscoring records[edit]

Assists[edit]

Most assists[edit]

Ryan Giggs has the most assists in the UEFA Champions League's history.
As of 12 December 2023[78]

Notes: The criteria for an assist to be awarded may vary according to the source. This table does not include assists provided in the qualification stage of the competition. The following table includes the number of assists since the 1992–93 season.[78] However, according to UEFA's own official list, Cristiano Ronaldo sits at 1st place with 42 official assists and Ryan Giggs sits at 5th with 33 assists.[79]

Players taking part in the 2023–24 UEFA Champions League are highlighted in boldface.

Rank Player Nation Assists Apps Years Club(s)
1 Ryan Giggs  Wales 41 141 1993–2014 Manchester United
2 Cristiano Ronaldo  Portugal 40 183 2003–2022 Manchester United, Real Madrid, Juventus
3 Lionel Messi  Argentina 39 163 2005–2023 Barcelona, Paris Saint-Germain
4 David Beckham  England 36 107 1994–2013 Manchester United, Real Madrid, Milan, Paris Saint-Germain
Ángel Di María  Argentina 107 2007– Benfica, Real Madrid, Paris Saint-Germain, Juventus
6 Luís Figo  Portugal 34 103 1997–2009 Barcelona, Real Madrid, Inter Milan
7 Xavi  Spain 31 151 1998–2015 Barcelona
8 Neymar  Brazil 30 81 2013–2023 Barcelona, Paris Saint-Germain
9 Raúl  Spain 27 142 1995–2011 Real Madrid, Schalke 04
Karim Benzema  France 152 2005–2023 Lyon, Real Madrid

Single season (since 1992–93)[edit]

As of 16 May 2018[80]
Rank Player Season Assists
1 Luís Figo 1999–2000 9
2 David Beckham 1998–99 8
Gaizka Mendieta 2000–01
Neymar 2016–17
James Milner 2017–18

Other records[edit]

Other records[edit]

Most wins[edit]

Paco Gento holds the record for the most win the tournament on six occasions.
Paolo Maldini, winner of two European Cups and three Champions League titles with Milan, appeared in eight finals.
Clarence Seedorf was the first player to win the tournament with three clubs.
Cristiano Ronaldo holds the record for the most match wins in the tournament.

Relatives[edit]

Oldest and youngest[edit]

Penalties[edit]

Penalty shoot-out[edit]

Own goals[edit]

Goalkeeping[edit]

Disciplinary[edit]

Captaincy[edit]

The following table shows the captains who have won the title:

Final Nationality Winning captain Nation Club Ref.
1956  Spain Miguel Muñoz  Spain Real Madrid [121]
1957  Spain Miguel Muñoz  Spain