European Latsis Prize

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The European Latsis Prize is awarded annually by the European Science Foundation for "outstanding and innovative contributions in a selected field of European research". The prize is worth 100,000 Swiss francs and is awarded within a different discipline each year. The prize was inaugurated in 1999 by the Latsis Foundation.

Winners[edit]

Year Awardee Country Chosen Field Rationale
1999 Jürgen Baumert  Germany "Research and/or Innovation in Education"[1]
2000 Kenneth Holmes  Germany
 United Kingdom
"Molecular Structure"[2]
2001 André Berger[3]  Belgium "Climate Research"
2002 Annette Karmiloff-Smith  United Kingdom "Cognitive Sciences"
2003 Colin Renfrew[4]  United Kingdom "Archaeology"
2004 Amos Bairoch[5]   Switzerland "Bioinformatics"
2005 Donal Bradley[6]  United Kingdom "Nano-Engineering"
2006 Rainer Bauböck  Austria "immigration and social cohesion in modern societies" "for his in-depth research on migration issues"[7]
2007 Willi Kalender  Germany "Medical Imaging" "for his outstanding contributions in the field of medical imaging"[8]
2008 Simon White  United Kingdom "Astrophysics" "for his outstanding contribution to the field of astrophysics"[9]
2009 Uta Frith  United Kingdom/ Germany
Chris Frith[10]
2010 Ilkka Hanski  Finland "Biodiversity" "for his contributions to research concerning biodiversity in general and metapopulation biology in particular"[11]
2011 James Vaupel  Germany "Demography" "for his contributions to research on ageing and lifespan, and his profound influence on demographic research"
2012 Uffe Haagerup  Denmark “Mathematics” "for ground-breaking and important contributions to the theory of operator algebras"[12]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "German researcher wins first European Latsis Prize". European Commission: CORDIS. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  2. ^ "European Latsis Prize winner 2000". European Commission: CORDIS. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  3. ^ http://www.esf.org/esf_pressarea_page.php?section=6&language=0&newsrelease=49
  4. ^ http://www.esf.org/esf_pressarea_page.php?language=0§ion=6&year=2003&newsrelease=72
  5. ^ http://www.esf.org/esf_pressarea_page.php?section=6&language=0&newsrelease=80
  6. ^ http://www.esf.org/esf_pressarea_page.php?section=6&language=0&newsrelease=97
  7. ^ "European Latsis Prize winner 2006". European Commission: CORDIS. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  8. ^ "European Latsis Prize winner 2007". European Commission: CORDIS. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  9. ^ "European Latsis Prize winner 2010". European Science Foundation. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  10. ^ "EXT: Single-News : European Science Foundation". Esf.org. Retrieved 2010-08-09. 
  11. ^ "European Latsis Prize winner 2010". European Science Foundation. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  12. ^ "European Latsis Prize winner 2012". European Commission: CORDIS. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 

External links[edit]