European Youth Olympic Festival

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The European Youth Olympic Festival (EYOF) is a biennial multi-sport event for youth athletes from the 48 member countries of the association of European Olympic Committees. The festival has a summer edition, held for the first time in Brussels in 1991, and a winter edition, which began two years later in Aosta. It was known at the European Youth Olympic Days from 1991 to 1999.[1]

History[edit]

The event is run by the European Olympic Committees, under the patronage of the International Olympic Committee, and was the first multi-sport event in the Olympic tradition specifically for European athletes; it predates its senior equivalent, the European Games by some 24 years, and the Youth Olympic Games by 19 years.

The event should not be confused with the various European junior and youth championships in individual sports, such as the European Junior Athletics Championships which are organised by sporting federations.

Editions[edit]

Summer[edit]

Edition Year Host City Host Nation Start Date End Date Nations Competitors Sports Events Top Placed Team
I 1991 Brussels  Belgium 12 July 21 July 33 2,084 10  France
II 1993 Valkenswaard  Netherlands 3 July 9 July 43 1,874 10  Russia
III 1995 Bath  Great Britain 9 July 14 July 47 1,709 10  Great Britain
IV 1997 Lisbon  Portugal 18 July 24 July 47 2,500 10  Russia
V 1999 Esbjerg  Denmark 10 July 16 July 48 2,324 11  Russia
VI 2001 Murcia  Spain 3 July 9 July 48 2,500 10  Russia
VII 2003 Paris  France 28 July 2 August 48 2,500 10  Russia
VIII 2005 Lignano Sabbiadoro  Italy 3 July 8 July 48 3,965 11  Russia
IX 2007 Belgrade  Serbia 22 July 27 July 48 3,000 11  Russia
X 2009 Tampere  Finland 19 July 26 July 49 3,302 9  Russia
XI 2011 Trabzon  Turkey 24 July 29 July 49 3,138 9  Russia
XII 2013 Utrecht  Netherlands 14 July 19 July 49 3,143 9  Russia
XIII 2015 Tbilisi  Georgia 26 July 1 August 50 3,304 9  Russia
XIV 2017 Győr  Hungary 22 July 30 July 10
XV 2019 Baku  Azerbaijan
XVI 2021 Košice  Slovakia 24 July 1 August 10

Winter[edit]

Edition Year Host City Host Nation Start Date End Date Nations Competitors Sports Events Top Placed Team
I 1993 Aosta  Italy 7 February 10 February 33 708 5  Russia
II 1995 Andorra la Vella  Andorra 4 February 10 February 40 740 4  Italy
II 1997 Sundsvall  Sweden 7 February 13 February 41 991 6  Russia
IV 1999 Poprad-Tatry  Slovakia 6 March 12 March 40 819 7  Russia
V 2001 Vuokatti  Finland 11 March 15 March 40 1,111 7  Russia
VI 2003 Bled  Slovenia 25 January 31 January 41 1,242 7  Russia
VII 2005 Monthey   Switzerland 23 January 28 January 41 1,184 8  Russia
VIII 2007 Jaca  Spain 18 February 23 February 43 1,284 8  Russia
IX 2009 Silesian Voivodeship  Poland 15 February 20 February 47 1,615 9  Russia
X 2011 Liberec  Czech Republic 13 February 18 February 44 1,492 8  Germany
XI 2013 Braşov  Romania 17 February 22 February 45 1,465 8  Russia
XII 2015 Vorarlberg
Vaduz
 Austria
 Liechtenstein
25 January 30 January 45 1,519 8  Russia
XIII 2017 Erzurum  Turkey 12 February 17 February 34 646 9  Russia
XIV 2019 Sarajevo & East Sarajevo  Bosnia and Herzegovina 9 February 16 February 7
XV 2021 Vuokatti  Finland 6 February 13 February 9

Participating nations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bell, Daniel (2003). Encyclopedia of International Games. McFarland and Company, Inc. Publishers, Jefferson, North Carolina. ISBN 0-7864-1026-4.

External links[edit]