Europium(III) bromide

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Europium(III) bromide
Names
IUPAC name
Tribromoeuropium
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ECHA InfoCard 100.033.939
EC Number
  • 237-349-5
Properties
EuBr3
Molar mass 391.68 g[1]
Melting point 702 °C (1,296 °F; 975 K)[1]
Will dissolve[2]
Thermochemistry
50.7 ± 3[3]
-186.1 ± 3[3]
-179.3 ± 3[3]
Hazards
GHS pictograms GHS07: Harmful
GHS Signal word Warning
H315, H319, H335[4]
P261, P264, P271, P280, P302+352, P304+340, P305+351+338, P312, P362, P403+233[4]
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g. canola oilHealth code 0: Exposure under fire conditions would offer no hazard beyond that of ordinary combustible material. E.g. sodium chlorideReactivity code 1: Normally stable, but can become unstable at elevated temperatures and pressures. E.g. calciumSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
1
0
1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Europium(III) bromide (or Europium tribromide) is a crystalline compound made of one europium and three bromine atoms.[2] Europium tribromide is a grey powder at room temperature.[2] It is odorless.[5] Europium tribromide is hygroscopic.[6]

Reactions[edit]

When vaporized Europium(III) bromide reacts by the equation:

  • 2 EuBr3 → 2 Eu + 3 Br2[3][7]

Europium(III) bromide is also created through the equations:

  • 4 EuBr2+ 4 HBr → 4 EuBr3 + 2 H2[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Elements, American. "Europium(III) Bromide". American Elements. Retrieved 21 December 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Phillips, Sidney L.; Perry, Dale L. (1995). Handbook of inorganic compounds. Boca Raton: CRC Press. p. 159. ISBN 9780849386718.
  3. ^ a b c d Haschke, John M. "The phase equilibria, vaporization behavior, and thermodynamic properties of europium tribromide". University of Michigan. Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan. Retrieved 23 December 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Europium(III) Bromide" (PDF). Prochem. Retrieved 21 December 2016.
  5. ^ "Europium(III) bromide hydrate, White crystalline, Reaction, 99.99% (REO),". www.fishersci.com. Retrieved 21 December 2016.
  6. ^ "Europium (III) Bromide | 13759-88-1". www.chemicalbook.com. Retrieved 21 December 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Hydrogen Production Options for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants International Conference on Non-Electric Applications of Nuclear Power" (PDF). Argonne. Retrieved 23 December 2016.