Eurovision Song Contest 1957

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Eurovision Song Contest 1957
ESC 1957 logo.png
Dates
Final3 March 1957
Host
VenueGroßer Sendesaal des hessischen Rundfunks
Frankfurt, West Germany
Presenter(s)Anaid Iplicjian
Musical directorWilly Berking
Directed byMichael Kehlmann
Host broadcasterARD[a]
Hessischer Rundfunk (HR)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/frankfurt-1957 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries10
Debuting countries
Non-returning countriesNone
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries
Vote
Voting systemTen-member juries in each country; each member gave one vote to their favourite song
Winning song Netherlands
"Net als toen"
1956 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1958

The Eurovision Song Contest 1957 was the second edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Hessischer Rundfunk (HR) on behalf of ARD, the contest, originally known as the Grand Prix Eurovision de la Chanson Européenne 1957 (English: Eurovision Grand Prize of European Song 1957 [1]) was held on Sunday 3 March 1957 and was hosted at the Großer Sendesaal des hessischen Rundfunks in Frankfurt, West Germany by German actress Anaid Iplicjian.

Ten countries took part, with Austria, Denmark, and the United Kingdom competing for the first time and joining the original seven participating countries from the first contest in 1956. A number of changes to the rules from the previous year's event were enacted, with each country now represented by only one song, which could be performed by up to two performers on stage. The voting system received an overhaul, with each country's jury now comprising ten individuals who could award one vote to their favourite song. The results of the voting were now conducted in public, with a scoreboard introduced to allow the process to be followed by viewers and listeners at home. Jurors were also for the first time not allowed to vote for the song from their own country.

The winner of the contest was the Netherlands, with the song "Net als toen" performed by Corry Brokken. This was Brokken's second appearance as a participant, after previously representing the Netherlands in 1956; her victory marked the first of five Dutch wins in the contest as of 2023.[2]

Location[edit]

Großer Sendesaal des hessischen Rundfunks, Frankfurt – venue of the 1957 contest

The 1957 contest took place in Frankfurt, West Germany. The selected venue was the Großer Sendesaal des hessischen Rundfunks, a music hall and former broadcasting studio located in the Dornbusch district, and part of the wider Broadcasting House Dornbusch which serves as the headquarters and main broadcasting facility of the German public broadcaster for the state of Hesse, Hessischer Rundfunk (HR).[3][4] The contest was held in front of an audience of around 400 people.[5][6]

A new plan for staging the event was invoked ahead of the 1957 contest, with a different broadcaster organising the contest each year, after Switzerland's SRG SSR, which had both hosted the contest and provided the winning entry in 1956, declined to stage it for a second time.[6] Germany was subsequently selected to host the second edition, after Hans-Otto Grünefeldt, TV program director at HR, offered to organise it on behalf of ARD.[a][3][7]

Format[edit]

The contest was hosted by German actress Anaid Iplicjian.[3][6] The stage built in the Großer Sendesaal featured a staircase for each artist and conductor to make their entrance, and a harp-shaped background. The centre of the background contained a removable background, allowing for a different graphic to be used for each nation's performance.[6][8] The entire contest, including the performances and voting, lasted around one hour in total.[5][9] Held just over nine months after the inaugural contest, the contest date of 3 March remains the earliest date in the calendar year in which the contest has been held.[6]

A number of changes from the rules of the previous year's contest were enacted in 1957. Each country was now permitted to send only one song to compete, as opposed to the maximum of two in 1956.[8] Up to two people were now allowed on stage during the performance – only solo artists were permitted to compete previously – however no other vocal backing was allowed.[3][6][8]

A new voting system was introduced, with ten individuals in each country giving one vote to their favourite song, with no abstentions allowed.[6] In an additional change to the 1956 rules, jurors were not allowed to vote for the song from their own country.[6][10] A scoreboard was introduced for the first time, and the voting process was now included as part of the broadcast, rather than conducted in secret as in 1956. This new aspect of the contest was inspired by the United Kingdom's Festival of British Popular Songs, which included voting by regional juries and the points received shown on a scoreboard, a telerecording of which was viewed by EBU organisers.[5][6] Each jury assembled in their own country to follow the contest on television and were then contacted by telephone by the contest's presenter in order to receive their votes, in a change from 1956 when the jurors were co-located to the contest venue.[6][8]

Each song, as in 1956, was required to last no longer than three minutes and 30 seconds, however several of the competing entries went beyond this limit. Italy's song, which lasted for five minutes and nine seconds, remains the longest song in the contest's history and, despite heavy protest, was not disqualified.[6][8] Conversely, the United Kingdom's first entry lasted for one minute and 53 seconds in total, and remained the shortest song to compete in the contest until 2015.[6] Subsequently the restriction on song length was more strictly monitored from 1958 onwards.[6][8] Each entry was performed alongside the Tanz- und Unterhaltungsorchester des Hessischen Rundfunks under the direction of the contest's musical director Willy Berking.[11][12]

Awards were presented to the winning artist and songwriters for the first time, taking the form of a medallion engraved with the Eurovision logo, which were awarded at the end of the broadcast by Eberhard Beckmann [de], director of Hessischer Rundfunk.[10][13]

Participating countries[edit]

Ten countries participated in the 1957 contest, with the seven countries which took park in the first contest being joined by Austria, Denmark and the United Kingdom in their first appearances.[3] Austria and Denmark had originally planned to compete in 1956, but missed the cut-off date for entry.[14][15]

Conductors[edit]

Each country was allowed to nominate their own musical director to lead the orchestra during the performance of their country's entry, with the host musical director, Willy Berking, also conducting for those countries which did not nominate their own conductor.[11] The conductors listed below led the orchestra during the performance for the indicated countries.[16][17]

Participants and results[edit]

Corry Brokken (pictured in 1958) had previously represented the Netherlands in 1956 before entering the contest again in 1957 and ultimately winning.

Two of the participating artists, Switzerland's Lys Assia and the Netherlands' Corry Brokken, had previously competed at the 1956 contest. Brokken was one of the two Dutch participants in that year's contest, competing with the song "Voorgoed voorbij", while Assia had performed both of Switzerland's entries, "Das alte Karussell" and "Refrain", the latter of which had won the contest.[18]

The winner was the Netherlands represented by the song "Net als toen", composed by Guus Jansen, written by Willy van Hemert and performed by Corry Brokken.[19] Notable among this year's participants were Denmark's Birthe Wilke and Gustav Winckler, the first duo to compete in the contest, who made an impact with a passionate on-screen kiss at the end of their performance; and Germany's Margot Hielscher, the first Eurovision act to use a prop during their performance, in this instance a telephone.[3][6]

Participants and results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1957[20][21][22]
R/O Country Artist Song Language Points Place
1  Belgium Bobbejaan Schoepen "Straatdeuntje" Dutch 5 8
2  Luxembourg Danièle Dupré "Amours mortes (tant de peine)" French 8 4
3  United Kingdom Patricia Bredin "All" English 6 7
4  Italy Nunzio Gallo "Corde della mia chitarra" Italian 7 6
5  Austria Bob Martin "Wohin, kleines Pony?" German 3 10
6  Netherlands Corry Brokken "Net als toen" Dutch 31 1
7  Germany Margot Hielscher "Telefon, Telefon" German[b] 8 4
8  France Paule Desjardins "La Belle amour" French 17 2
9  Denmark Birthe Wilke and Gustav Winckler "Skibet skal sejle i nat" Danish 10 3
10  Switzerland Lys Assia "L'Enfant que j'étais" French 5 8

Detailed voting results[edit]

The announcement of the results from each country was conducted in reverse order to the order in which each country performed.[10]

Detailed voting results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1957[10][23][24]
Total score
Switzerland
Denmark
France
Germany
Netherlands
Austria
Italy
United Kingdom
Luxembourg
Belgium
Contestants
Belgium 5 1 2 2
Luxembourg 8 3 4 1
United Kingdom 6 2 1 1 1 1
Italy 7 1 2 2 1 1
Austria 3 1 2
Netherlands 31 7 3 4 1 6 1 1 3 5
Germany 8 6 1 1
France 17 2 6 1 2 4 2
Denmark 10 5 3 2
Switzerland 5 2 1 1 1

Spokespersons[edit]

Each country nominated a spokesperson who was responsible for announcing the votes for their respective country via telephone.[25] Known spokespersons at the 1957 contest are listed below.

Broadcasts[edit]

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating EBU member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[28] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

The 1957 contest is the earliest edition to exist in full in the EBU's archives, as the 1956 edition has survived solely through audio recordings, with some missing segments, and limited video footage of the winning reprise performance through newsreel and other recordings.[6][9][29] Although the number of households which had access to a television in Europe continued to grow, this edition, as in the case of the 1956 contest, was still mainly accessed by spectators via radio.[3]

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF ORF Unknown [30]
 Belgium NIR NIR Unknown [31][32]
INR INR Unknown [32]
 Denmark Statsradiofonien Statsradiofonien TV, Program 2 Svend Pedersen [33][34]
 France RTF RTF Robert Beauvais [35][36]
Paris-Inter Unknown [37]
 Germany ARD Deutsches Fernsehen Unknown [32][36][38]
 Italy RAI Programma Nazionale, Secondo Programma Bianca Maria Piccinino [37][39][40][41]
 Luxembourg CLT Télé-Luxembourg Unknown [42][43]
 Netherlands NTS NTS Piet te Nuyl Jr. [19][32][44]
 Switzerland SRG SSR SRG Unknown [36][37][45]
TSR Robert Beauvais
DRS 1 Unknown
RSR 1 Unknown
RSI 1 Unknown
 United Kingdom BBC BBC Television Service Berkeley Smith [1][20][46]
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Monaco Radio Monte-Carlo Unknown [37][47]
 Sweden SR Sveriges TV Nils Linnman [sv] [47]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Arbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen Rundfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik Deutschland – "Working group of public broadcasters of the Federal Republic of Germany"
  2. ^ The song also contains words in English, French, Italian and Spanish.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Television Programmes – 3 March". Radio Times. 3 March 1957. p. 13. Archived from the original on 2 June 2022. Retrieved 2 June 2022.
  2. ^ "Netherlands – Country Profile". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 May 2022. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Frankfurt 1957 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  4. ^ "Grundsteinlegung des hr-Sendesaals" (in German). hr-Sinfonieorchester. 11 March 2018. Archived from the original on 5 June 2021. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  5. ^ a b c Roxburgh 2012, p. 152.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Escudero, Victor M. (26 October 2017). "#ThrowbackThursday to 60 years ago: Eurovision 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 2 January 2018. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  7. ^ Rolfs, Pia (3 March 2017). "Grand Prix Eurovision vor 60 Jahren: Am Main siegte ein "Meisje"". Frankfurter Neue Presse (in German). Archived from the original on 5 June 2021. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  8. ^ a b c d e f O'Connor 2010, pp. 10–11.
  9. ^ a b "Looking back to just like it was in 1957". European Broadcasting Union. 3 March 2014. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  10. ^ a b c d Roxburgh 2012, pp. 156–158.
  11. ^ a b O'Connor 2010, p. 217.
  12. ^ "Radio und Fernsehen". Der Bund (in German). Bern, Switzerland. 3 March 1957. p. 21. Archived from the original on 6 October 2022. Retrieved 12 June 2022.
  13. ^ O'Connor 2010, p. 216.
  14. ^ "Lugano 1956 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 23 May 2022. Retrieved 29 May 2022.
  15. ^ Jordan, Paul; Roxburgh, Gordon (11 January 2017). "Shining a light on the United Kingdom: 60 Years at Eurovision". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 24 April 2017. Retrieved 31 May 2022.
  16. ^ Roxburgh 2012, pp. 152–156.
  17. ^ "Detailed overview: conductors in 1957". And the conductor is... Archived from the original on 1 July 2022. Retrieved 1 July 2022.
  18. ^ "Participants of Lugano 1956 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 26 October 2021. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  19. ^ a b "Corry Brokken – Netherlands – Frankfurt 1997". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 April 2022. Retrieved 18 July 2022.
  20. ^ a b Roxburgh 2012, pp. 152–158.
  21. ^ "Final of Frankfurt 1957 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 May 2022. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  22. ^ "1957 – 2nd edition". diggiloo.net. Archived from the original on 17 May 2022. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  23. ^ "Results of the Final of Frankfurt 1957 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 27 March 2021. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  24. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1957 – Scoreboard". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2021.
  25. ^ "How it works – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. 18 May 2019. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  26. ^ Abbate, Mauro (7 May 2022). "Italia all'Eurovision Song Contest: tutti i numeri del nostro Paese nella kermesse europea" (in Italian). Notizie Musica. Archived from the original on 9 June 2022. Retrieved 1 July 2022.
  27. ^ "Verrassingen". De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 4 May 1957. p. 2. Archived from the original on 6 October 2022. Retrieved 2 June 2022.
  28. ^ "The Rules of the Contest | Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 14 April 2017. Retrieved 13 September 2022.
  29. ^ Roxburgh, Gordon (19 October 2015). "A diamond day for the Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 30 July 2017. Retrieved 24 February 2021.
  30. ^ "Austria – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 5 June 2022.
  31. ^ "Belgium – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  32. ^ a b c d "Programma's Binnen- en Buitenlandse Zenders". De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 2 March 1957. p. 13. Archived from the original on 2 June 2022. Retrieved 2 June 2022.
  33. ^ "Denmark – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  34. ^ "Programoversigt – 03-03-1957" (in Danish). Dansk Kulturarv. 3 March 1957. Archived (PDF) from the original on 5 June 2022. Retrieved 5 June 2022.
  35. ^ "France – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  36. ^ a b c "Le Journal de la Télévision". Radio – Je vois tout (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Héliographia SA. 28 February 1957. p. 18. Archived from the original on 2 June 2022. Retrieved 2 June 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  37. ^ a b c d "Programmes des Émissions Suisses et Étrangères". Radio – Je vois tout (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Héliographia SA. 28 February 1957. pp. 20–22. Archived from the original on 2 June 2022. Retrieved 2 June 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  38. ^ "Germany – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 14 August 2019. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  39. ^ "Radio e televisione". La Stampa (in Italian). 3 March 1957. p. 4. Retrieved 2 June 2022.
  40. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1957" (in Italian). Eurofestival News. 11 September 2016. Archived from the original on 11 April 2022. Retrieved 19 December 2022.
  41. ^ "Italy – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  42. ^ "Luxembourg – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 5 June 2022.
  43. ^ "Télé-Luxembourg". Luxemburger Wort (in German and French). 2 March 1957. p. 6. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  44. ^ "Vertrokken naar song-festival". De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 1 March 1957. p. 7. Archived from the original on 6 October 2022. Retrieved 2 June 2022.
  45. ^ "Switzerland – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  46. ^ "United Kingdom – Frankfurt 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 4 March 2019. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  47. ^ a b Thorsson, Leif; Verhage, Martin (2006). Melodifestivalen genom tiderna : de svenska uttagningarna och internationella finalerna (in Swedish). Stockholm: Premium Publishing. pp. 10–11. ISBN 91-89136-29-2.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

50°08′09″N 08°40′33″E / 50.13583°N 8.67583°E / 50.13583; 8.67583