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Eurovision Song Contest 1958

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Eurovision Song Contest 1958
ESC 1958 logo.png
Dates
Final12 March 1958
Host
VenueAVRO Studios
Hilversum, Netherlands
Presenter(s)Hannie Lips
Musical directorDolf van der Linden
Directed byPiet te Nuyl
Host broadcasterNederlandse Televisie Stichting (NTS)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/hilversum-1958 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries10
Debuting countries
Non-returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1958United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song ContestA coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1958
Vote
Voting systemTen-member juries in each country; each member gave one vote to their favourite song
Winning song France
"Dors, mon amour"
1957 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1959

The Eurovision Song Contest 1958 was the third edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Nederlandse Televisie Stichting (NTS), the contest, originally known as the Grand Prix Eurovision de la Chanson Européenne 1958 (English: Grand Prix of the Eurovision Song Contest 1958[1]) was held on Wednesday 12 March 1958 at the AVRO Studios in Hilversum, the Netherlands and hosted by Dutch television presenter Hannie Lips. This marked the first time that the contest was hosted in the country of the preceding year's winner, a tradition that has been continued ever since (with some exceptions).

Ten countries participated, equalling the number which took part the previous year; Sweden made its first appearance in the contest, while the United Kingdom decided not to participate.

The winner of the contest was France, represented by the song "Dors, mon amour" performed by André Claveau, marking the first of five eventual wins for the country. Another entry however made a greater impact following the contest; the Italian entry, "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" performed by Domenico Modugno which had placed third, became a worldwide hit for Modugno, winning two Grammy Awards in 1959 and becoming a chart success in several countries.

Location[edit]

AVRO Studios, Hilversum – host venue of the 1958 contest

The 1958 contest took place in Hilversum, the Netherlands. The selected venue was the AVRO Studios, which served at the time as the main radio and television broadcasting facilities of the Dutch broadcaster AVRO.[2][3] Often called "media city", Hilversum is the principal centre for radio and television broadcasting in the Netherlands and is the location of several of the organisations that make up Nederlandse Publieke Omroep (NPO) public broadcasting organisation.[4][5]

Although they had won in 1957, the Netherlands' did not receive automatic rights to host the contest, as the convention in place at the time specified that each broadcaster would stage the event in turns.[6] The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) had been the first choice to stage the event in the United Kingdom, but gave up the rights after failing to reach agreement with artistic unions.[7] Subsequently the Dutch broadcaster, Nederlandse Televisie Stichting (NTS), only received the rights to host the event after other broadcasters declined the opportunity.[6][8][9] This established the tradition that the previous year's winner would host it the following year.[10][11]

Format[edit]

The stage and orchestra at the Eurovision Song Contest 1958

The contest was hosted by Dutch broadcaster Hannie Lips. Held in one of the studios of the AVRO broadcasting complex, the hall contained a small stage for the singers, with the orchestra situated stage right. The rear of the performance area had interchangeable backgrounds for each song to add context to each song's lyrics, which could also be removed to show the scoreboard during the voting sequence, and the venue was decorated with thousands of tulips.[2][12]

No significant changes to the rules of the 1957 contest were implemented; each country, participating through one EBU member broadcaster, was represented by one song performed by up to two people on stage.[2][10] Due to several entries having violated the duration limit in the previous event, the maximum song limit of 3 minutes and 30 seconds was more stringently enforced for this year's entries.[6] The voting system was the same as the one used the previous year; the results were determined through jury voting, with each country's jury containing ten individuals who each gave one vote to their favourite song, with no abstentions allowed and with jurors unable to vote for their own country.[10]

During the live transmission of the contest several countries were unable to see or hear the Italian entry, which was the first act to perform, due to a technical fault, and it was subsequently allowed to perform again after the last song.[9][10][13] Each entry was accompanied by the Metropole Orkest, led by the contest's musical director Dolf van der Linden; the Metropole Orkest also performed as the interval act between the final competing performance and the commencement of the voting results, which included a performance of Cielito Lindo.[14]

Participating countries[edit]

Ten countries participated in the 1958 contest, the same number as had featured in the previous year's event. Sweden entered the contest for the first time, while the United Kingdom decided not to compete, despite having originally intended to participate and being listed as one of the participating countries in the original rules dated November 1957.[2][7][10]

Conductors[edit]

Each country was allowed to nominate their own musical director to lead the orchestra during the performance of their country's entry, with the host musical director, Dolf van der Linden, also conducting for those countries which did not nominate their own conductor.[15] The conductors listed below led the orchestra during the performance for the indicated countries.[10][16]

Participants and results[edit]

André Claveau (right) celebrating with conductor Franck Pourcel and host Hannie Lips after winning the contest
Italy's Domenico Modugno during a performance rehearsal in the contest venue

Several of the participants had previously competed in the contest. Switzerland's Lys Assia and the Netherlands' Corry Brokken had both represented their countries in 1956 and 1957, and were both former winners; Assia was the first winner of the contest in 1956 with the song "Refrain", and had also performed Switzerland's other entry in that contest "Das alte Karussell", while Brokken had performed "Voorgoed voorbij" in the 1956 contest, one of the Netherlands' two entries, and was then the winner the following year with the song "Net als toen".[17][18] Belgium's Fud Leclerc had also competed in the 1956 contest, performing "Messieurs les noyés de la Seine", one of his country's two entries, and Margot Hielscher returned to perform for Germany for a second year in a row, having competed in 1957 with "Telefon, Telefon".[17][18]

The winner was France represented by the song "Dors, mon amour", composed by Pierre Delanoë, written by Hubert Giraud and performed by André Claveau.[19] This was the first of an eventual five contest victories that France would go on to achieve.[20]

The Italian entry, "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" performed by Domenico Modugno, went on to become a worldwide success, and was one of the first Eurovision songs to achieve notability outside of the contest.[9] Popularly known as "Volare", the song went to number one in the US Billboard Hot 100, as well as reaching the top 5 in singles charts in Belgium, Canada, the Netherlands and Norway, and the top 10 in the United Kingdom, and was named Record of the Year and Song of the Year at the first edition of the Grammy Awards held in May 1959.[21][22][23][24][25] The song has been covered by several artists, including Dean Martin, Dalida and Gipsy Kings, and many new versions with lyrics in different languages have been produced.[26][27] "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" was also nominated in 2005 to compete in Congratulations: 50 Years of the Eurovision Song Contest, a special broadcast to determine the contest's most popular entry of its first 50 years as part of the contest's anniversary celebrations. One of 14 entries chosen to compete, "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" ultimately finished in second place behind "Waterloo", ABBA's winning song from the 1974 contest.[28][29]

Participants and results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1958[10][30][31]
R/O Country Artist Song Language Points Place
1  Italy Domenico Modugno "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" Italian 13 3
2  Netherlands Corry Brokken "Heel de wereld" Dutch 1 9
3  France André Claveau "Dors, mon amour" French 27 1
4  Luxembourg Solange Berry "Un grand amour" French 1 9
5  Sweden Alice Babs "Lilla stjärna" Swedish 10 4
6  Denmark Raquel Rastenni "Jeg rev et blad ud af min dagbog" Danish 3 8
7  Belgium Fud Leclerc "Ma petite chatte" French 8 5
8  Germany Margot Hielscher "Für zwei Groschen Musik" German 5 7
9  Austria Liane Augustin "Die ganze Welt braucht Liebe" German 8 5
10  Switzerland Lys Assia "Giorgio" German, Italian 24 2

Detailed voting results[edit]

The scoreboard of the Eurovision Song Contest 1958

The announcement of the results from each country was conducted in reverse order to the order in which each country performed.[10]

Detailed voting results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1958[10][32][33]
Total score
Switzerland
Austria
Germany
Belgium
Denmark
Sweden
Luxembourg
France
Netherlands
Italy
Contestants
Italy 13 1 1 4 4 1 1 1
Netherlands 1 1
France 27 1 7 1 1 9 1 1 6
Luxembourg 1 1
Sweden 10 3 1 1 3 2
Denmark 3 1 1 1
Belgium 8 1 5 1 1
Germany 5 1 1 1 2
Austria 8 2 1 1 1 3
Switzerland 24 2 4 5 3 6 4

Spokespersons[edit]

Each country nominated a spokesperson who was responsible for announcing the votes for their respective country via telephone.[34] Known spokespersons at the 1958 contest are listed below.

Broadcasts[edit]

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating EBU member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[38] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF ORF Unknown [39]
 Belgium INR INR Unknown [40][41][42]
Radio Belgique Unknown
NIR NIR Unknown [41]
 Denmark Statsradiofonien Statsradiofonien TV and Program 1 Svend Pedersen [43][44][45]
 France RTF RTF Pierre Tchernia [19][46][47]
France I Unknown [42]
 Germany ARD Deutsches Fernsehen Unknown [41][46][48]
 Italy RAI Programma Nazionale and Secondo Programma Bianca Maria Piccinino [42][49][50]
 Luxembourg CLT Télé-Luxembourg Unknown [51][52]
 Netherlands NTS NTS Siebe van der Zee [nl] [41][53][54]
NRU Hilversum 1 [41]
 Sweden SR Sveriges TV Jan Gabrielsson [sv] [37][55]
 Switzerland SRG SSR TV DRS Unknown [42][46][56]
TSR and Radio Genève Georges Hardy [fr]
Radio Bern Unknown
Radio Monte Ceneri Unknown
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 United Kingdom BBC[a] BBC Television Service Peter Haigh [1][10]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The United Kingdom provided a delayed broadcast of the contest on 16 March.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Television Programmes – Sunday Afternoon". Radio Times. 16 March 1958. p. 12. Retrieved 5 June 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d "Hilversum 1958 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 30 May 2022. Retrieved 6 June 2022.
  3. ^ "Former AVRO-studio". Dudok Architectuur Centrum. Archived from the original on 6 June 2022. Retrieved 6 June 2022.
  4. ^ LaFleur, Louise (6 September 2019). "How the Netherlands hosts the Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 15 April 2020. Retrieved 6 June 2022.
  5. ^ "About Hilversum". Gemeente Hilversum. Archived from the original on 8 March 2022. Retrieved 6 June 2022.
  6. ^ a b c Escudero, Victor M. (26 October 2017). "#ThrowbackThursday to 60 years ago: Eurovision 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 2 January 2018. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  7. ^ a b Jordan, Paul; Roxburgh, Gordon (11 January 2017). "Shining a light on the United Kingdom: 60 Years at Eurovision". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 24 April 2017. Retrieved 31 May 2022.
  8. ^ "Looking back to just like it was in 1957". European Broadcasting Union. 3 March 2014. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  9. ^ a b c O'Connor 2010, pp. 12–13.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Roxburgh 2012, pp. 160–165.
  11. ^ "How it works – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. 15 January 2017. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  12. ^ Zwart, Josianne (4 November 2017). "A decade of song: Eurovision winners through the years (1956-1959)". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 4 November 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2022.
  13. ^ Escudero, Victor M. (2 September 2017). "Ciao Italia! Top 10 entries from Italy". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 3 September 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2022.
  14. ^ O'Connor 2010, p. 216.
  15. ^ O'Connor 2010, p. 217.
  16. ^ "Detailed overview: conductors in 1958". And the conductor is... Retrieved 1 July 2022.
  17. ^ a b "Participants of Lugano 1956 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 26 October 2021. Retrieved 9 June 2022.
  18. ^ a b "Participants of Frankfurt 1957 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 May 2022. Retrieved 9 June 2022.
  19. ^ a b "André Claveau – France – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 April 2022. Retrieved 18 July 2022.
  20. ^ "France – Country Profile". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 5 June 2022. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  21. ^ "Domenico Modugno – Nel blu dipinto di blu". dutchcharts.nl. Archived from the original on 10 March 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  22. ^ "CHUM Hit Parade Chart: Week of August 25, 1958". CHUM Hit Parade. Archived from the original on 7 April 2022. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  23. ^ "Domenico Modugno | Full Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 28 January 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  24. ^ "1st Annual Grammy Awards | 1958". Grammy Awards. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  25. ^ "Billboard Hot 100 – Week of August 18, 1958". Billboard. Archived from the original on 29 June 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  26. ^ "Volare | full Official Chart History | Official Charts Company". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 12 July 2022. Retrieved 13 September 2022.
  27. ^ "Eurovision : ces chansons sont devenues des tubes". Paris Match (in French). 26 April 2021. Archived from the original on 11 August 2022. Retrieved 13 September 2022.
  28. ^ ""Congratulations" – 14 songs to compete". European Broadcasting Union. 16 June 2005. Archived from the original on 28 August 2005. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  29. ^ "Abba win 'Eurovision 50th' vote". BBC News. 23 October 2005. Archived from the original on 10 June 2022. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  30. ^ "Final of Hilversum 1958 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 3 June 2022. Retrieved 22 June 2021.
  31. ^ "1958 – 3rd edition". diggiloo.net. Archived from the original on 22 March 2022. Retrieved 9 June 2022.
  32. ^ "Results of the Final of Hilversum 1958 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 27 March 2021. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  33. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1958 – Scoreboard". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 July 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2021.
  34. ^ "How it works – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  35. ^ Abbate, Mauro (7 May 2022). "Italia all'Eurovision Song Contest: tutti i numeri del nostro Paese nella kermesse europea" (in Italian). Notizie Musica. Archived from the original on 9 June 2022. Retrieved 1 July 2022.
  36. ^ "Nederlandse jurywoordvoerders bij het Eurovisie Songfestival" (in Dutch). Eurovision Artists. Retrieved 22 June 2022.
  37. ^ a b Thorsson, Leif; Verhage, Martin (2006). Melodifestivalen genom tiderna : de svenska uttagningarna och internationella finalerna (in Swedish). Stockholm: Premium Publishing. pp. 14–15. ISBN 91-89136-29-2.
  38. ^ "The Rules of the Contest | Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 14 April 2017. Retrieved 13 September 2022.
  39. ^ "Austria – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 13 September 2022.
  40. ^ "Belgium – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  41. ^ a b c d e "Programma's Binnen- en Buitenlandse Zenders". De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 11 March 1958. p. 9. Retrieved 5 June 2022.
  42. ^ a b c d "Programmes des Émissions Suisses et Étrangères". Radio – Je vois tout (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Héliographia SA. 6 March 1958. pp. 38–40. Retrieved 5 June 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  43. ^ "Denmark – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  44. ^ "Programoversigt – Fjernsyn – 12-03-1958" (in Danish). Dansk Kulturarv. 12 March 1958. Archived (PDF) from the original on 5 June 2022. Retrieved 5 June 2022.
  45. ^ "Programoversigt – Program 1 – 12-03-1958" (in Danish). Dansk Kulturarv. 12 March 1958. Archived (PDF) from the original on 5 June 2022. Retrieved 5 June 2022.
  46. ^ a b c "Télévision". Radio – Je vois tout (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Héliographia SA. 5 March 1958. pp. 22–23. Retrieved 5 June 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  47. ^ "La carrière de Pierre Tchernia résumée en dix moments clés". Le Soir (in French). 8 October 2016. Archived from the original on 5 June 2022. Retrieved 5 June 2022.
  48. ^ "Germany – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 11 September 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  49. ^ "Oggi e domani alla radio". La Stampa (in Italian). 12 March 1958. p. 8. Retrieved 2 June 2022.
  50. ^ "Italy – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  51. ^ "Luxembourg – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 9 June 2022.
  52. ^ "Télé-Luxembourg". Luxemburger Wort (in German and French). 11 March 1958. p. 4. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  53. ^ "Hilversum in actie voor 70 minuten Eurovisie". Nieuwe Leidsche Courant. 10 March 1958. p. 5. Retrieved 11 June 2021.
  54. ^ "Netherlands – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  55. ^ "Sweden – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  56. ^ "Switzerland – Hilversum 1958". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 52°14′N 5°11′E / 52.233°N 5.183°E / 52.233; 5.183