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Eurovision Song Contest 1959

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Eurovision Song Contest 1959
ESC 1959 logo.png
Dates
Final11 March 1959
Host
VenuePalais des Festivals et des Congrès
Cannes, France
Presenter(s)Jacqueline Joubert
Musical directorFranck Pourcel
Directed byMarcel Cravenne
Host broadcasterRadiodiffusion-Télévision Française (RTF)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/cannes-1959 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries11
Debuting countries Monaco
Returning countries United Kingdom
Non-returning countries Luxembourg
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Monaco in the Eurovision Song Contest 1959Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestA coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1959
Vote
Voting systemTen-member juries in each country; each member gave one vote to their favourite song
Winning song Netherlands
"Een beetje"
1958 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1960

The Eurovision Song Contest 1959 was the fourth edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest, held on Wednesday 11 March 1959 at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès in Cannes, France, and hosted by French television presenter Jacqueline Joubert. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radiodiffusion-Télévision Française (RTF), the contest, originally known as the Grand Prix Eurovision de la Chanson Européenne 1959 (English: Grand Prix of the Eurovision Song Contest 1959[1]), was held in France following the country's victory at the 1958 contest with the song "Dors, mon amour", performed by André Claveau.

In total eleven countries participated in the contest, with Monaco making its first appearance and the United Kingdom returning after their absence the previous year. Luxembourg, however, decided not to participate after competing in all former editions.

The winner was the Netherlands with the song "Een beetje", performed by Teddy Scholten, composed by Dick Schallies and written by Willy van Hemert. This was the Netherlands' second victory in the contest, having also won in 1957, and also marked the first time a country had won the contest more than once. Van Hemert also became the first individual to win twice, having also written the first Dutch winning song from 1957, "Net als toen". The United Kingdom placed second, marking the first of a record sixteen times that the country would go on to finish as contest runners-up, while France placed third.

Location[edit]

Palais des Festivals et des Congrès, Cannes – host venue of the 1959 contest

The event took place in Cannes, France, following the nation's victory at the 1958 edition in Hilversum, Netherlands, with the song "Dors, mon amour", performed by André Claveau. The selected venue was the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès, built in 1949 to host the Cannes Film Festival and located on the Promenade de la Croisette along the shore of the Mediterranean Sea.[2][3] Due to the growth in the film festival a new building bearing the same name was opened in 1982, with the original building renamed as the Palais Croisette.[4]

This marked the second occasion in which the previous year's winning country organised the event, and the first time in which the winning country was given first choice at hosting the following year's event, as the rights to host the 1958 contest were only awarded to the Netherlands after all other countries declined.[2][5]

Format[edit]

The contest was organised and broadcast by the French public broadcaster Radiodiffusion-Télévision Française (RTF) and was hosted by French television presenter Jacqueline Joubert.[2][6] The stage constructed for the event featured three revolving platforms, each of which was segmented into four, similar to a revolving door, to include various backdrops.[7] These backdrops were specific to each of the participating countries and featured scenery or objects associated with that country.[8]

As in the 1957 and 1958 contests, each country, participating through a single EBU member broadcaster, was represented by one song performed by up to two people on stage. The results of the event were determined through jury voting, with each country's jury containing ten individuals who each gave one vote to their favourite song, with no abstentions allowed and with jurors unable to vote for their own country.[2][6] One rule change implemented for this contest specified that individuals employed in the music industry were no longer allowed to be included among the national juries.[6] Alongside the traditional reprise performance of the winning song, the second- and third-placed songs were also performed again, for the first and only time at the contest.[2][6]

Participating countries[edit]

A total of eleven countries competed in the contest, with Monaco making its first appearance and the United Kingdom returning after a one year absence.[6] The United Kingdom's absence from the 1958 contest is generally reported to have been due to the country's poor result in 1957, but their return coincided with the international success of "Nel blu, dipinto di blu", the Italian entry from the previous year's contest, and the appointment of Eric Maschwitz as Head of Light Entertainment at the BBC.[9][10] Beginning with this event the United Kingdom holds the record for the longest string of consecutive appearances in the Eurovision Song Contest, appearing in every subsequent contest final as of 2022.[11][12] Luxembourg was absent from the event, having participated in all previous contests, and appears to have decided against participating late in the preparations for the contest as the country was listed among the participants in several radio and television listings.[1][2][13]

Conductors[edit]

Each country was allowed to nominate their own musical director to lead the orchestra during the performance of their country's entry, with the host musical director, Franck Pourcel, also conducting for those countries which did not nominate their own conductor.[14] The conductors listed below led the orchestra during the performance for the indicated countries.[2][15]

Participants and results[edit]

Teddy Scholten upon returning to the Netherlands following her contest win
Assembled crowd at Schipol Airport for Scholten's homecoming

Among this year's participants, two artists had previously competed in the contest. Birthe Wilke had placed third for Denmark in the 1957 contest, performing "Skibet skal sejle i nat" alongside Gustav Winckler, and Domenico Modugno had placed third for Italy in the 1958 contest with "Nel blu, dipinto di blu".[16][17]

The winner was the Netherlands represented by the song "Een beetje", composed by Dick Schallies [nl], written by Willy van Hemert and performed by Teddy Scholten.[18] The Netherlands became the first country to achieve two victories in the event, and Van Hemert became the first individual to win the contest twice, after previously providing lyrics for the Netherlands' winner in 1957, "Net als toen".[6][7] The United Kingdom's result was the first of sixteen British entries to finish in second place, a contest record as of 2022.[7][11]

Participants and results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1959[2][19][20]
R/O Country Artist Song Language Points Place
1  France Jean Philippe "Oui, oui, oui, oui" French 15 3
2  Denmark Birthe Wilke "Uh, jeg ville ønske jeg var dig" Danish 12 5
3  Italy Domenico Modugno "Piove (Ciao, ciao bambina)" Italian 9 6
4  Monaco Jacques Pills "Mon ami Pierrot" French 1 11
5  Netherlands Teddy Scholten "Een beetje" Dutch 21 1
6  Germany Alice and Ellen Kessler "Heute Abend wollen wir tanzen geh'n" German 5 8
7  Sweden Brita Borg "Augustin" Swedish 4 9
8  Switzerland Christa Williams "Irgendwoher" German 14 4
9  Austria Ferry Graf "Der K und K Kalypso aus Wien" German 4 9
10  United Kingdom Pearl Carr and Teddy Johnson "Sing, Little Birdie" English 16 2
11  Belgium Bob Benny "Hou toch van mij" Dutch 9 6

Detailed voting results[edit]

The announcement of the results from each country was conducted in reverse order to that which each country performed.[2]

Detailed voting results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1959[2][21][22]
Total score
Belgium
United Kingdom
Austria
Switzerland
Sweden
Germany
Netherlands
Monaco
Italy
Denmark
France
Contestants
France 15 2 1 1 4 2 1 4
Denmark 12 2 2 1 4 1 1 1
Italy 9 1 3 1 1 3
Monaco 1 1
Netherlands 21 3 1 3 2 1 7 4
Germany 5 1 1 1 2
Sweden 4 3 1
Switzerland 14 1 5 1 3 1 1 2
Austria 4 1 2 1
United Kingdom 16 2 2 3 5 2 1 1
Belgium 9 2 3 1 1 2

Spokespersons[edit]

Each country nominated a spokesperson who was responsible for announcing the votes for their respective country via telephone.[23] Known spokespersons at the 1959 contest are listed below.

Broadcasts[edit]

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its television network. Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers. Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the table below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF ORF Unknown [26]
 Belgium NIR NIR Unknown [27][28]
INR INR Unknown [28]
 Denmark DR Danmarks Radio TV and Program 2 Sejr Volmer-Sørensen [29][13]
 France RTF RTF Unknown [30][31][32]
France II Unknown
 Germany ARD Deutsches Fernsehen Unknown [28][31][33]
 Italy RAI Programma Nazionale and Secondo Programma Renato Tagliani [it] [32][34][35]
 Monaco Télé Monte-Carlo Unknown [36]
Radio Monte-Carlo Unknown [32]
 Netherlands NTS NTS Piet te Nuyl Jr. [18][28][37]
NRU Hilversum 1 [28][37]
 Sweden SR Sveriges TV and SR P1 Jan Gabrielsson [sv] [8][38]
 Switzerland SRG SSR TV DRS Unknown [31][32][39]
TSR Unknown
TSI Unknown
Radio Bern Unknown
Radio Genève Unknown
Radio Monte Ceneri Unknown
 United Kingdom BBC BBC Television Service Tom Sloan [1][2][40]
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Luxembourg CLT Télé-Luxembourg Unknown [41]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Television Programmes – Wednesday Evening". Radio Times. 6 March 1959. p. 19. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Roxburgh 2012, pp. 184–192.
  3. ^ "The Palais Croisette : 33 years of service". cannes.com. Archived from the original on 2 March 2022. Retrieved 14 June 2022.
  4. ^ "The 1983 festival inaugurates the Palais des Festivals". cannes.com. Archived from the original on 1 March 2022. Retrieved 14 June 2022.
  5. ^ Escudero, Victor M. (26 October 2017). "#ThrowbackThursday to 60 years ago: Eurovision 1957". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 2 January 2018. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Cannes 1959 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  7. ^ a b c O'Connor 2010, pp. 14–15.
  8. ^ a b c Thorsson, Leif; Verhage, Martin (2006). Melodifestivalen genom tiderna : de svenska uttagningarna och internationella finalerna (in Swedish). Stockholm: Premium Publishing. pp. 20–21. ISBN 91-89136-29-2.
  9. ^ O'Connor 2010, pp. 12–13.
  10. ^ Roxburgh 2012, p. 166.
  11. ^ a b "United Kingdom – Country Profile". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 May 2022. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  12. ^ Jordan, Paul; Roxburgh, Gordon (11 January 2017). "Shining a light on the United Kingdom: 60 Years at Eurovision". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 24 April 2017. Retrieved 31 May 2022.
  13. ^ a b "Programoversigt – Program 2 / Fjernsyn – 11-03-1959" (in Danish). Dansk Kulturarv. 11 March 1959. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 June 2022. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  14. ^ O'Connor 2010, p. 217.
  15. ^ "Detailed overview: conductors in 1959". And the conductor is... Retrieved 25 June 2022.
  16. ^ "Participants of Frankfurt 1957 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 May 2022. Retrieved 13 June 2022.
  17. ^ "Participants of Hilversum 1958 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 28 October 2021. Retrieved 13 June 2022.
  18. ^ a b "Teddy Scholten – Netherlands – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 27 December 2021. Retrieved 18 July 2022.
  19. ^ "Final of Cannes 1959 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 3 January 2022. Retrieved 22 June 2021.
  20. ^ "1959 – 4th edition". diggiloo.net. Archived from the original on 22 March 2022. Retrieved 9 June 2022.
  21. ^ "Results of the Final of Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 27 March 2021. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  22. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1959 – Scoreboard". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 29 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2021.
  23. ^ "How it works – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  24. ^ Abbate, Mauro (7 May 2022). "Italia all'Eurovision Song Contest: tutti i numeri del nostro Paese nella kermesse europea" (in Italian). Notizie Musica. Archived from the original on 9 June 2022. Retrieved 1 July 2022.
  25. ^ "Succes van Teddy Scholten in Cannes met „Een beetje"". Nieuwe Leidsche Courant. 12 March 1959. pp. 1, 5. Retrieved 11 June 2021.
  26. ^ "Austria – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  27. ^ "Belgium – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  28. ^ a b c d e "Programma's binnen- en buitenlandse zenders". De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 10 March 1959. p. 17. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  29. ^ "Denmark – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 23 March 2019. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  30. ^ "France – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  31. ^ a b c "Les programmes de la Télévision". Radio Je vois tout – télévision (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Héliographia SA. 5 March 1959. pp. 20–21. Retrieved 11 June 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  32. ^ a b c d "Programmes des Émissions Suisses et Étrangères". Radio Je vois tout – télévision (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Héliographia SA. 11 March 1959. pp. 38–40. Retrieved 11 June 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  33. ^ "Germany – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  34. ^ "Oggi e domani alla Radio". La Stampa (in Italian). 11 March 1959. p. 8. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  35. ^ "Italy – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  36. ^ "Monaco – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 14 June 2022.
  37. ^ a b Pasterkamp, Bert (11 March 1959). "Modugno in Cannes en... het regent". Het Vrije Volk (in Dutch). p. 1. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  38. ^ "Sweden – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  39. ^ "Switzerland – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  40. ^ "United Kingdom – Cannes 1959". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 12 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  41. ^ "Télé-Luxembourg". Luxemburger Wort (in German and French). 10 March 1959. p. 4. Retrieved 6 November 2022.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°33′12″N 7°01′20″E / 43.55333°N 7.02222°E / 43.55333; 7.02222