Eurovision Song Contest 1960

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Eurovision Song Contest 1960
ESC 1960 Logo.PNG
Dates
Final29 March 1960
Host
VenueRoyal Festival Hall
London, United Kingdom
Presenter(s)Catherine Boyle
Musical directorEric Robinson
Directed byInnes Lloyd
Executive producerHarry Carlisle
Host broadcasterBritish Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/london-1960 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries13
Debuting countries
Returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Monaco in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1960A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries
Vote
Voting systemTen-member juries in each country; each member gave one vote to their favourite song
Winning song France
"Tom Pillibi"
1959 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1961

The Eurovision Song Contest 1960 was the fifth edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest, held on Tuesday 29 March 1960 at the Royal Festival Hall in London, United Kingdom, and hosted by British television presenter and actress Catherine Boyle. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), the United Kingdom was offered the rights to stage the contest after the Netherlands, which had won the 1959 contest, declined the opportunity after having previously organised the event in 1958.

Luxembourg returned to the competition after an absence of one year, and Norway made its first contest appearance, bringing the total number of participating countries to thirteen.

The winner was France with the song "Tom Pillibi", performed by Jacqueline Boyer, composed by André Popp and written by Pierre Cour. This marked France's second contest victory, having also won in 1958. The United Kingdom placed second for the second consecutive year and Monaco earned their first top three finish by placing third.

Location[edit]

Royal Festival Hall, London – host venue of the 1960 contest

The contest took place in London, United Kingdom. Although the Netherlands had won the 1959 contest in Cannes, the Dutch broadcaster Nederlandse Televisie Stichting (NTS) declined to stage the event for a second time in three years, after previously hosting the 1958 edition in Hilversum. The rights to staging the contest subsequently passed to the United Kingdom's British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), following the UK's second place finish in the previous year's event, a decision which was announced in October 1959.[1][2]

The Royal Festival Hall was chosen to stage the 1960 contest. Situated on the South Bank of the River Thames, the venue was first opened in 1951 and was originally conceived for use during that year's Festival of Britain; it is now part of the Southbank Centre, a complex of several artistic venues.[2][3][4]

Format[edit]

The Royal Festival Hall auditorium (pictured in 2017)

The contest was presented by British television presenter and actress Catherine Boyle, the first of four contests in which she participated as host.[5][6] Boyle presided over the opening of the contest and the voting process, while the various national broadcasters that carried the show provided commentary between each act, with the United Kingdom's commentator David Jacobs also being heard by the assembled audience of over 2,500 people in the hall.[2][7] The draw to determine the order in which each country would perform was conducted on 28 March in the presence of the performers. Performance and technical rehearsals involving the artists and orchestra were held on 28 and 29 March ahead of the live transmission from 21:00 GMT.[2] The stage built for the contest was designed by Richard Levin.[2]

As had been the case since the 1957 contest, each country, participating through a single EBU member broadcaster, was represented by one song performed by up to two people on stage. The results of the event were determined through jury voting, with each country's jury containing ten individuals who each gave one vote to their favourite song, with no abstentions allowed and with jurors unable to vote for their own country.[1][8] A new innovation for this year's event was to allow the national juries to listen to the final rehearsal of each country, which was also recorded to allow jury members to listen to the entries ahead of the live contest.[2][7]

It was originally planned for the top three songs to be performed again following the voting, as had occurred in the 1959 contest, however this was ultimately scrapped and only the winning song received its traditional reprise performance.[9] The winning artist was presented with a silver gilt vase, which was awarded by Teddy Scholten; this marked the first time that the previous year's winning artist awarded the prize to the next contest winner, which has since become Eurovision tradition.[10][11]

Participating countries[edit]

The number of entries grew to thirteen for this edition, with the eleven competing countries from the 1959 contest being joined by Luxembourg, returning after a one year absence, and Norway, making its first appearance.[1][2][10]

Conductors[edit]

Each country was allowed to nominate their own musical director to lead the orchestra during the performance of their country's entry, with the host musical director, Eric Robinson, also conducting for those countries which did not nominate their own conductor.[12] The conductors listed below led the orchestra during the performance for the indicated countries.[6][13]

Participants and results[edit]

Jacqueline Boyer, the winner of the Eurovision Song Contest 1960

Fud Leclerc made his third appearance at the contest for Belgium, having previously represented the country in 1956 with "Messieurs les noyés de la Seine" (one of the two Belgian entries in that year's contest) and in 1958 with "Ma petite chatte".[14] The song from Luxembourg was the first contest entry to be performed in Luxembourgish, and one of only three entries to be performed in the language (alongside the country's entries from 1992 and 1993).[6][15]

The winner was France represented by the song "Tom Pillibi", composed by André Popp, written by Pierre Cour and performed by Jacqueline Boyer.[16] Boyer is the daughter of Jacques Pills, who had represented Monaco in the previous year's contest and placed last with "Mon ami Pierrot".[6][10] France's victory was their second in the contest, following their win in 1958, and brought them level on number of victories with the Netherlands.[1][17] The United Kingdom gained their second consecutive second place finish, while Monaco considerably improved upon their debut performance the previous year with a third place finish.[18][19]

Participants and results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1960[20][21][22]
R/O Country Artist Song Language Points Place
1  United Kingdom Bryan Johnson "Looking High, High, High" English 25 2
2  Sweden Siw Malmkvist "Alla andra får varann" Swedish 4 10
3  Luxembourg Camillo Felgen "So laang we's du do bast" Luxembourgish 1 13
4  Denmark Katy Bødtger "Det var en yndig tid" Danish 4 10
5  Belgium Fud Leclerc "Mon amour pour toi" French 9 6
6  Norway Nora Brockstedt "Voi Voi" Norwegian[a] 11 4
7  Austria Harry Winter "Du hast mich so fasziniert" German 6 7
8  Monaco François Deguelt "Ce soir-là" French 15 3
9  Switzerland Anita Traversi "Cielo e terra" Italian 5 8
10  Netherlands Rudi Carrell "Wat een geluk" Dutch 2 12
11  Germany Wyn Hoop "Bonne nuit ma chérie" German[b] 11 4
12  Italy Renato Rascel "Romantica" Italian 5 8
13  France Jacqueline Boyer "Tom Pillibi" French 32 1

Detailed voting results[edit]

The announcement of the results from each country was conducted in reverse order to the order in which each country performed.[9]

Detailed voting results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1960[9][23][24]
Total score
France
Italy
Germany
Netherlands
Switzerland
Monaco
Austria
Norway
Belgium
Denmark
Luxembourg
Sweden
United Kingdom
Contestants
United Kingdom 25 2 1 5 4 1 3 2 1 5 1
Sweden 4 2 1 1
Luxembourg 1 1
Denmark 4 2 1 1
Belgium 9 3 1 1 4
Norway 11 1 1 4 1 1 2 1
Austria 6 1 1 2 2
Monaco 15 3 7 1 2 1 1
Switzerland 5 1 2 1 1
Netherlands 2 1 1
Germany 11 4 2 2 2 1
Italy 5 1 2 1 1
France 32 1 2 1 5 1 5 3 4 1 4 5

Spokespersons[edit]

Each country nominated a spokesperson who was responsible for announcing the votes for their respective country via telephone.[25] Known spokespersons at the 1960 contest are listed below.

Broadcasts[edit]

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating EBU member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[28]

Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF ORF Unknown [29]
 Belgium INR INR Georges Désir [fr] [6][30][31]
NIR NIR Nic Bal [nl] [6][32]
 Denmark DR Danmarks Radio TV, Program 2 Sejr Volmer-Sørensen [6][33][34]
 France RTF RTF Pierre Tchernia [6][16]
 Germany ARD Deutsches Fernsehen Wolf Mittler [6][30][35]
 Italy RAI Programma Nazionale, Secondo Programma Giorgio Porro [6][36][37][38][39]
 Luxembourg CLT Télé-Luxembourg Unknown [40][41]
 Monaco Télé Monte-Carlo Unknown [42]
 Netherlands NTS NTS Piet te Nuyl Jr. [6][30][43][44]
NRU [nl] Hilversum 2 [6][30][43]
 Norway NRK NRK Fjernsynet, NRK Erik Diesen [6][45][46][47]
 Sweden SR Sveriges TV, SR P2 Jan Gabrielsson [sv] [6][7][48]
 Switzerland SRG SSR TV DRS, DRS 1 Theodor Haller [de] [6][38][49][50]
TSR Unknown
TSI Unknown
RSR 1 Unknown
RSI 1 Unknown
 United Kingdom BBC BBC Television Service David Jacobs [6][51][52]
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Finland YLE Suomen Televisio Aarno Walli [fi] [2][53][54]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the song was performed in Norwegian, the title and sentence in the lyrics "Voi Voi" is in Northern Sami.
  2. ^ Although the song title is in French, the song was performed entirely in German.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "London 1960 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Roxburgh 2012, pp. 213–214.
  3. ^ "Royal Festival Hall". Royal Opera House. Archived from the original on 14 June 2020. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  4. ^ "Our venues | Southbank Centre". Southbank Centre. Archived from the original on 20 May 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  5. ^ Zwart, Josianne (21 March 2018). "Katie Boyle, iconic Eurovision Song Contest host, dies at 91". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 March 2018. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Roxburgh 2012, pp. 214–219.
  7. ^ a b c d Thorsson, Leif; Verhage, Martin (2006). Melodifestivalen genom tiderna : de svenska uttagningarna och internationella finalerna (in Swedish). Stockholm: Premium Publishing. pp. 26–27. ISBN 91-89136-29-2.
  8. ^ Roxburgh 2012, pp. 213–224.
  9. ^ a b c d Roxburgh 2012, pp. 219–222.
  10. ^ a b c O'Connor 2010, pp. 16–17.
  11. ^ O'Connor 2010, p. 216.
  12. ^ O'Connor 2010, p. 217.
  13. ^ "Detailed overview: conductors in 1956". And the conductor is... Retrieved 1 July 2022.
  14. ^ "Belgium – Country Profile". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 15 May 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  15. ^ "Luxembourg". diggiloo.net. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  16. ^ a b "Jacqueline Boyer – France – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 12 May 2018. Retrieved 13 September 2022.
  17. ^ "Winners – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 5 June 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  18. ^ "United Kingdom – Country Profile". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 May 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  19. ^ "Monaco – Country Profile". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 23 November 2021. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  20. ^ Roxburgh 2012, pp. 214–222.
  21. ^ "Final of London 1960 – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 27 March 2021. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  22. ^ "1960 – 5th edition". diggiloo.net. Archived from the original on 22 March 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  23. ^ "Results of the Final of London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 27 March 2021. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  24. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1960 – Scoreboard". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 July 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2021.
  25. ^ "How it works – Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. 18 May 2019. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  26. ^ Abbate, Mauro (7 May 2022). "Italia all'Eurovision Song Contest: tutti i numeri del nostro Paese nella kermesse europea" (in Italian). Notizie Musica. Archived from the original on 9 June 2022. Retrieved 1 July 2022.
  27. ^ "Toch geen geluk voor Rudi". Nieuwe Leidsche Courant. 30 March 1960. p. 7. Retrieved 14 June 2021.
  28. ^ "The Rules of the Contest". European Broadcasting Union. 31 October 2018. Archived from the original on 4 October 2022. Retrieved 13 December 2022.
  29. ^ "Austria – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 14 September 2022.
  30. ^ a b c d "Programma's binnen- en buitenlandse zenders". De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 28 March 1960. p. 7. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  31. ^ "Belgium – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  32. ^ "Televisiekijkers voor U..." De Gazet van Aalst (in Flemish). 26 March 1960. p. 2. Retrieved 22 June 2022.
  33. ^ "Programoversigt – Program 2 / Fjernsyn – 29-03-1960" (in Danish). Dansk Kulturarv. 29 March 1960. Archived (PDF) from the original on 15 June 2022. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  34. ^ "Denmark – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 March 2019. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  35. ^ "Germany – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  36. ^ "I programmi TV e radio". La Stampa (in Italian). 29 March 1960. p. 4. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  37. ^ "Stasera alla TV". La Stampa (in Italian). 29–30 March 1960. p. 8. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  38. ^ a b "Programmes des Émissions Suisses et Étrangères". Radio Je vois tout – télévision (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Héliographia SA. 24 March 1960. pp. 33–35. Retrieved 15 June 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  39. ^ "Italy – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  40. ^ "Luxembourg – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  41. ^ "Télé-Luxembourg". Luxemburger Wort (in German and French). 28 March 1960. p. 6. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  42. ^ "Monaco – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  43. ^ a b "Rudi Carell als tiende". Het Binnenhof (in Dutch). 28 March 1960. p. 2. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  44. ^ "Netherlands – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  45. ^ "Radioprogrammet / Fjernsynet". Drammens Tidende (in Norwegian). 29 March 1960. p. 4. Retrieved 15 June 2022 – via National Library of Norway.
  46. ^ "TV". Drammens Tidende (in Norwegian). 30 March 1960. p. 11. Retrieved 15 June 2022 – via National Library of Norway.
  47. ^ "Norway – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 25 March 2019. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  48. ^ "Sweden – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  49. ^ "TV". Radio Je vois tout – télévision (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Héliographia SA. 24 March 1960. pp. 22–23. Retrieved 15 June 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  50. ^ "Switzerland – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  51. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest Grand Prix 1960". Radio Times. 27 March 1960. Retrieved 15 June 2022 – via BBC Genome Project.
  52. ^ "United Kingdom – London 1960". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 12 May 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2022.
  53. ^ "Radio-ohjelma". Helsingin Sanomat (in Finnish). 29 March 1960. p. 37. Retrieved 7 November 2022. (subscription required)
  54. ^ Pajala, Mari (2013). Badenoch, Alexander; Fickers, Andreas; Henrich-Franke, Christian (eds.). "Intervision Song Contests and Finnish Television between East and West". Airy Curtains in the European Ether: Broadcasting and the Cold War. Baden-Baden, Germany: Nomos: 215–270. doi:10.5771/9783845236070-215. ISBN 9783845236070 – via Academia.edu. Walli was closely involved in YLE's ESC productions; among other things he [...] provided the commentary for all the 1960s ESCs on Finnish television.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°30′21.01″N 0°07′00.44″W / 51.5058361°N 0.1167889°W / 51.5058361; -0.1167889