Eurovision Song Contest 1987

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Eurovision Song Contest 1987
ESC 1987 logo.png
Dates
Final9 May 1987
Host
VenuePalais du Centenaire
Brussels, Belgium
Presenter(s)Viktor Lazlo
Musical directorJo Carlier
Directed byJacques Bourton
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Executive producerMichel Gehu
Host broadcasterRadio-télévision belge de la Communauté française (RTBF)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/brussels-1987 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries22
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries
Non-returning countriesNone
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Malta in the Eurovision Song ContestAustria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1987A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1987
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8–1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points Turkey
Winning song Ireland
"Hold Me Now"
1986 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1988

The Eurovision Song Contest 1987 was the 32nd edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Brussels, Belgium, following the country's victory at the 1986 contest with the song "J'aime la vie" by Sandra Kim. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radio-télévision belge de la Communauté française (RTBF), the contest was held at the Centenary Palace on 9 May 1987 (also Europe Day) and was hosted by French-Belgian singer Viktor Lazlo.

Twenty-two countries took part in the contest with Greece and Italy returning to the competition after their absences the previous year. This set the record for the highest number of competing countries up until that point.

The winner was Ireland with the song "Hold Me Now" by Johnny Logan. Johnny Logan had also won the 1980 contest, and he remains the only performer to have won the Eurovision Song Contest twice.

Location[edit]

The Centenary Palace of the Brussels Exhibition Centre, host venue of the 1987 contest

The contest took place at the Brussels Exhibition Centre (Brussels Expo) in Brussels, Belgium, a set of exhibition halls built from 1930 on the Heysel/Heizel Plateau (Heysel Park) in Laeken (northern part of the City of Brussels) to celebrate the centenary of Belgian Independence. The Centenary Palace (French: Palais du Centenaire, Dutch: Eeuwfeestpaleis), where the main stage was located, is one of the remaining buildings of the Brussels International Exposition of 1935. Currently, it is still being used for trade fairs, as well as concerts, usually for bigger acts and artists.

Format[edit]

Host broadcaster rule[edit]

Until the Sandra Kim win,Belgium has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 30 times since making its debut as one of seven countries at the first contest in 1956 and in this group was the one with the worst historical record, being the only one not to have won the contest. The country only twice finished the festival in the top five:Tonia's fourth place in 1966. In 1978, Jean Vallée achieved Belgium's first top-three placement, when he was the runner-up that year. Despite being the big favorite in bookmakers, the Belgian victory in Bergen the previous year was involved in controversy because of the age of its contestant as her exact age was unknown. Since the start of voting with an early and consolidated win with 172 points, Belgium ended a wait of exactly 30 years and finally became the last country of the 7 founders of the contest to win its first triumph, but the internal situation in the country was so complex that it was a separate chapter in the history of the contest until then and spilled directly into the organization of the next edition.

From the internal point of view, the Sandra Kim's Eurovision victory in 1986 occurred amidst a complex political situation in Belgium: In the 1980s, the country was undergoing massive constitutional reforms in which the Belgian state was no longer centralized and unitary and was being transformed into a decentralized and federative system. As a result of the rising tensions between the two major linguistic regions of Belgium, Dutch-speaking Flanders and French-speaking Wallonia. Both regions had had independent broadcasters since 1960 (BRT in Flanders and RTBF in Wallonia) but had still agreed to jointly host the contest in the event of a Belgian victory. While the triumph of "J'aime la vie" in 1986 – an entry sent by French-speaking RTBF – reignited a sense of national union across all Belgian regions, but the two regional broadcasters weren't able in a consense to overcome their disagreements to make a joint host for the 1987 edition.[1] During the production of event, BRT eventually withdrew from the project and RTBF organised the contest alone as host broadcaster and became the first and only television who not competed on event when hosting the contest.[2] BRT remained in charge of the selection of the Belgian entry for the contest, as in all other odd-numbered years until 1993. Thirty-three years later, in her academic study "Which Belgium Won Eurovision? European Unity and Belgian Disunity" published in 2019,the scholar Julie Kalman describes how, as a consequence, the host country images in Eurovision 1987 mostly showed footage of Wallonia.[3]

Host city selection process[edit]

Locations of the considered venues: the chosen venue is marked in blue, while the eliminated locations are marked in red.

During the process to choose the host city and the venue,a joint committee was created and had members from both sides. This body found that the perfect place for the contest was the Royal Theatre of Antwerp, as both locations proposed by RTBF (the Palais du Centenaire in Brussels and the Patinoire de Coronmeuse [fr] in Liege) would have required too much and heavy renovation works until the proposed date for the contest. Nevertheless, RTBF demanded the event had to be held in Brussels with the argument that the city had a symbolism in several areas that transcend Belgium itself. In addition to its headquarters and the federal functions as the capital of the country which is a federated state and almost all the bodies of the European Union are also located there. Due to these "unique" features, Brussels "fits perfectly" as perfect host city and the probable date was also European Day (May 9th). On 6 October 1986, 7 months and three days before the contest, RTBF surprisingly and one-sidedly announced that the Palais du Centenaire a complex of exposition buildings inside the European Quarter, in Brussels was chosen as the possible host venue for the Eurovision Song Contest in 1987. The flemish leading newspaper Het Laatste Nieuws, turned public the information that BRT proposed instead the European Quarter, to host the contest at the Cirque Royal, near the Royal Palace of Brussels, adding that RTBF would be solely in charge of organizing the contest if BRT's counter-offer was not taken into consideration as their decision. However, the wallonian moved forward with the plans and confirmed that the Palais du Centenaire was the official contest's host venue .[1] The Flemish broadcaster was offended by the choice of Brussels as host city, and withdrew from the organization, but stayed with the duties to chose the host's country contestant.

Budget[edit]

The holding of the contest in Belgium caused several legal changes in the country system and forced the implementation of the most modern regulations and rules on matters related to the way in which public television was financed in the country. This led to the authorization of the use of advertising, sponsorships and marketing actions in the two public channels in the country and as a consequence, the RTBF was also allowed to sell sponsorship quotas for the event, which was a fact without precedents in thirty-one years of Eurovision Song Contest, as the available budget ended up being reduced with the departure of BRT from the production. For the RTBF, this decision was a relief, as the event was almost entirely with private funds and without requiring the payment of extra fees by the francophone population. For the sponsors, this was also another good reason, as their brands appeared for millions of people in several moments that led to the event and the live broadcasting and opened the doors to the commercial potential of the event itself, starting the period of modernization and increased interest for the event. [4] Apart the latent tensions, after the end of the contest, the then-BRT President Cas Goossens praised RTBF for a "perfect organization" while at the same time regretting that the two broadcasters weren't able to collaborate. He added that the cost of hosting Eurovision would have been difficult to justify to the Flemish taxpayers.[1]

Contest overview[edit]

The 1987 Eurovision was the biggest contest to date, and it was also the first in which more than 20 countries competed (22). Only Malta, Monaco and Morocco failed to compete out of all the countries which had entered the contest in the past. The large number of participating countries caused some problems for the EBU, which ranged from the available dates for the rehearsals to the readjustment of the duration of the televised final. Due this situation, after the contest, the EBU set the limit of participating countries to 22. This was a problematic question over the next five years as new and returning nations indicated an interest in participating, but they could not be accommodated.[5]

During the national selection period, a lot of controversy erupted in Israel after their song, "Shir Habatlanim" by the Lazy Bums, was selected. The comedic duo performance was criticised by the country's culture minister, who threatened to resign should the duo proceed to Brussels. After fierce discussion, they were allowed to perform for Israel, placing eighth; however the culture minister's threat was left unfulfilled.[5]

Another controversy happened when the singer Viktor Lazlo was invited to be the contest presenter. With a few days delay, she agreed to sign the contract, but added a clause related to the fact that she would have to perform with a song from her repertoire as she was releasing a new album at that time. The chosen song was the lead single from that album, namely "Breathless".

Participating countries[edit]

Conductors[edit]

Each performance had a conductor who directed the orchestra.[6][7]

Returning artists[edit]

Bold indicates a previous winner.

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Gary Lux  Austria 1983 (member of Westend), 1984 (as backing singer for Anita), 1985
Alexia  Cyprus 1981 (member of Island)
Wind  Germany 1985
Johnny Logan  Ireland 1980

Participants and results[edit]

R/O Country Artist Song Language[8][9] Points Place[10]
1  Norway Kate Gulbrandsen "Mitt liv" Norwegian 65 9
2  Israel Datner and Kushnir "Shir Habatlanim" (שיר הבטלנים) Hebrew 73 8
3  Austria Gary Lux "Nur noch Gefühl" German 8 20
4  Iceland Halla Margrét "Hægt og hljótt" Icelandic 28 16
5  Belgium Liliane Saint-Pierre "Soldiers of Love" Dutch[a] 56 11
6  Sweden Lotta Engberg "Boogaloo" Swedish 50 12
7  Italy Umberto Tozzi and Raf "Gente di mare" Italian 103 3
8  Portugal Nevada "Neste barco à vela" Portuguese 15 18
9  Spain Patricia Kraus "No estás solo" Spanish 10 19
10  Turkey Seyyal Taner and Lokomotif "Şarkım Sevgi Üstüne" Turkish 0 22
11  Greece Bang "Stop" (Στοπ) Greek 64 10
12  Netherlands Marcha "Rechtop in de wind" Dutch 83 5
13  Luxembourg Plastic Bertrand "Amour, amour" French 4 21
14  United Kingdom Rikki "Only the Light" English 47 13
15  France Christine Minier "Les Mots d'amour n'ont pas de dimanche" French 44 14
16  Germany Wind "Laß die Sonne in dein Herz" German 141 2
17  Cyprus Alexia "Aspro mavro" (Άσπρο μαύρο) Greek 80 7
18  Finland Vicky Rosti and Boulevard "Sata salamaa" Finnish 32 15
19  Denmark Anne-Cathrine Herdorf and Bandjo "En lille melodi" Danish 83 5
20  Ireland Johnny Logan "Hold Me Now" English 172 1
21  Yugoslavia Novi fosili "Ja sam za ples" (Ја сам за плес) Serbo-Croatian[a] 92 4
22  Switzerland Carol Rich "Moitié, moitié" French 26 17

Detailed voting results[edit]

Detailed voting results[11][12]
Total score
Norway
Israel
Austria
Iceland
Belgium
Sweden
Italy
Portugal
Spain
Turkey
Greece
Netherlands
Luxembourg
United Kingdom
France
Germany
Cyprus
Finland
Denmark
Ireland
Yugoslavia
Switzerland
Contestants
Norway 65 4 7 10 7 3 4 4 7 3 5 3 2 6
Israel 73 2 1 5 6 4 10 3 4 10 8 7 5 8
Austria 8 1 7
Iceland 28 4 4 4 6 10
Belgium 56 5 2 3 6 7 4 5 8 4 5 3 4
Sweden 50 12 8 1 3 7 2 3 7 7
Italy 103 3 6 3 5 1 12 12 8 4 1 12 1 4 12 12 7
Portugal 15 8 5 2
Spain 10 10
Turkey 0
Greece 64 1 2 6 8 5 7 5 7 12 6 5
Netherlands 83 5 2 10 5 7 3 8 3 12 2 2 6 8 10
Luxembourg 4 2 2
United Kingdom 47 10 5 3 5 3 3 1 2 1 4 3 2 5
France 44 1 4 5 4 1 12 5 10 2
Germany 141 3 8 10 12 10 7 4 5 1 6 10 6 10 6 6 10 12 7 7 1
Cyprus 80 6 6 2 12 2 6 5 3 6 10 8 10 4
Finland 32 10 3 4 2 1 8 2 1 1
Denmark 83 7 6 7 7 8 2 1 1 8 6 7 8 8 4 3
Ireland 172 8 4 12 12 12 12 8 10 10 12 10 12 1 6 8 12 5 6 12
Yugoslavia 92 12 7 8 10 8 6 6 12 2 2 10 8 1
Switzerland 26 1 2 5 7 3 4 1 3

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
8  Ireland  Austria,  Belgium,  Finland,  Italy,  Netherlands,  Sweden,  Switzerland,  United Kingdom
5  Italy  Germany,  Ireland,  Portugal,  Spain,  Yugoslavia
2  Germany  Denmark,  Iceland
 Yugoslavia  Norway,  Turkey
1  Cyprus  Greece
 France  Luxembourg
 Greece  Cyprus
 Netherlands  France
 Sweden  Israel

Spokespersons[edit]

Each country announced their votes in the order of performance. The following is a list of spokespersons who announced the votes for their respective country.

Broadcasts[edit]

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating EBU member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[17] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF FS1 Ernst Grissemann [18][19][20]
 Belgium BRT TV1 Luc Appermont [21][22][23][24]
BRT 2 Unknown
RTBF RTBF1 Unknown [22][23]
 Cyprus RIK RIK Fryni Papadopoulou [25][26]
 Denmark DR DR TV Jørgen de Mylius [27][28][29]
 Finland YLE TV1, 2-verkko [fi] Erkki Toivanen [30][31]
 France Antenne 2 Patrick Simpson-Jones [fr] [32][33][34]
 Germany ARD Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Lotti Ohnesorge [de] and Christoph Deumling [de] [19][23][35][36]
 Greece ERT ERT1 Dafni Bokota [37][38][39]
 Iceland RÚV Sjónvarpið Kolbrún Halldórsdóttir [40][41]
 Ireland RTÉ RTÉ 1 Marty Whelan [42][43][44][45]
RTÉ FM3 Larry Gogan
 Israel IBA Israeli Television Unknown [46][47]
 Italy RAI Rai Due[b] Rosanna Vaudetti [48][49]
 Luxembourg CLT RTL Télévision Unknown [22][23][50]
RTL plus Unknown
 Netherlands NOS Nederland 1 Willem van Beusekom [23][51]
 Norway NRK NRK Fjernsynet, NRK P2 John Andreassen [28][52][53]
 Portugal RTP RTP1 Unknown [54][55]
 Spain TVE TVE 2 Beatriz Pécker [es] [56][57]
 Sweden SVT TV1 Fredrik Belfrage [15][31][28][58]
RR [sv] SR P3 Jacob Dahlin [15][28]
 Switzerland SRG SSR SRG Sportkette [de] Bernard Thurnheer [de] [19][33][59][60]
SSR Chaîne sportive Serge Moisson [fr]
TSI Canale sportivo Unknown
 Turkey TRT TV1 Unknown [61][62]
 United Kingdom BBC BBC1 Terry Wogan [7][63][64][65]
BBC Radio 2 Ray Moore
 Yugoslavia JRT TV Beograd 1, TV Zagreb 1 Ksenija Urličić [16][48][66][67][68][69]
TV Koper-Capodistria Unknown
TV Ljubljana 1 [sl] Unknown
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Australia SBS SBS TV[c] Unknown [70]
 Hungary MTV MTV2[d] István Vágó [71]
 Poland TP TP1[e] Unknown [72]
 Soviet Union ETV[f] Unknown [73][74]
CT USSR Programme One[f]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Contains some phrases in English
  2. ^ Deferred broadcast at 22:45 CEST (20:45 UTC)[48]
  3. ^ Delayed broadcast on 11 May 1987 at 20:30 AEST (10:30 UTC)[70]
  4. ^ Deferred broadcast on 10 May at 20:00 CEST (18:00 UTC)[71]
  5. ^ Delayed broadcast on 23 May 1987 at 20:00 CEST (18:00 UTC)[72]
  6. ^ a b Delayed broadcast on 4 June 1987 at 23:25 MSD (19:25 UTC)[73]

References[edit]

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