Eurovision Song Contest 1992

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Eurovision Song Contest 1992
ESC 1992 logo.png
Dates
Final9 May 1992
Host
VenueMalmö Isstadion
Malmö, Sweden
Presenter(s)Lydia Capolicchio
Harald Treutiger
Musical directorAnders Berglund
Directed byKåge Gimtell
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Host broadcasterSveriges Television (SVT)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/malmo-1992 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries23
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries Netherlands
Non-returning countriesNone
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1992
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points in finalNone
Winning song Ireland
"Why Me?"
1991 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1993

The Eurovision Song Contest 1992 was the 37th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Malmö, Sweden, following the country's victory at the 1991 contest with the song "Fångad av en stormvind" by Carola. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Sveriges Television (SVT), the contest was held at the Malmö Isstadion on 9 May 1992 and was hosted by Swedish journalists Lydia Capolicchio and Harald Treutiger.[1]

Twenty-three countries took part in the contest with the Netherlands returning after being absent the year before. This set another record for the most participating countries in the history of the competition, which would be broken again the following year. The 1992 contest also saw the last participation of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, as they were banned from competing only a few weeks later due to the Yugoslav Wars.

The winner was Ireland with the song "Why Me?" by Linda Martin. The song was written by Johnny Logan, who had won the 1980 contest as singer and the 1987 contest as singer/songwriter. At 41 years of age, Linda Martin became (and remains) the oldest woman ever to win Eurovision.[2]

Location[edit]

Malmö Isstadion, Malmö – host venue of the 1992 contest.

Malmö is the capital and largest city of the Swedish county of Scania. The metropolis is a gamma world city (as listed by the GaWC) and is the third-largest city in Sweden, after Stockholm and Gothenburg, and the sixth-largest city in Scandinavia, with a population of above 300,000.[3]

Malmö Isstadion, an indoor ice hockey arena, was chosen to host Eurovision.[1]

Contest overview[edit]

The contest took place at the Malmö Isstadion, where the stage set was in the shape of a Viking ship's bow with a dragon in the centre and stars on each side. The opening sequence included women dressed in the Swedish colours of yellow and blue, twirling ribbons. The filmic postcard tradition was continued with clips based on each country. Last year's winner, Carola, appeared on stage in a white dress with sheer sleeves, a rhinestone collar and cuffs and sang “All The Reasons To Live”.

The 1992 Eurovision was the biggest contest at that time, with 23 countries competing. Only Monaco and Morocco failed to compete out of all the countries which had entered the contest in the past.

This contest marked the last participation of Yugoslavia, although it was not the same country that had participated from 1961 to 1991, but actually, Serbia and Montenegro, formally known as the "Federal Republic of Yugoslavia". That was the country's last entry until 2004, as it was banned from the contest following the sanctions on the United Nations Security Council Resolution 757, following the Bosnian War and Croatian War of Independence.

After scoring second place consecutively (1988, 1989) and scoring some disappointing results (1990, 1991), the United Kingdom sent Michael Ball with a contemporary pop song "One Step Out Of Time", which was the hot favourite to win the contest. The British delegation was greeted in Malmö with a banner reading "Welcome Untied Kingdom".[4]

However, the Irish sent Linda Martin, who had the past experience of coming in 2nd place in the 1984 contest and as then paired up once again with Johnny Logan, who had won the contest twice before as a performer. In the end, Linda the contest won for Ireland with a 16-point lead over the United Kingdom, starting the chain of Irish wins in the 1990s. Malta with "Little Child", performed by Mary Spiteri, also scored very well coming in 3rd place with 123 points. This was the first time that the three highest-placed songs had all been in English. Sweden, the host country, finished 2nd last.

Switzerland had to replace its original choice of entry, "Soleil, soleil" which was to have been performed by Géraldine Olivier. The song did not comply with some of the rules of the national selection contest and so, despite having won, it did not go to Malmö.

The top three songs were all performed in English which led to some delegations complaining that English-speaking countries had an unfair advantage.

Participating countries[edit]

Conductors[edit]

Each performance had a conductor who led the orchestra.[5][6] Musical Director Anders Berglund both conducted the entries for Sweden and Yugoslavia and played the accordion parts for the latter.

Returning artists[edit]

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Wind  Germany 1985, 1987
Sigríður Beinteinsdóttir (part of Heart 2 Heart)  Iceland 1990 (part of Stjórnin)
Linda Martin  Ireland 1984
Mia Martini  Italy 1977
Evridiki  Cyprus 1983 (backing singer for Stavros & Constantina), 1987 (Backing Vocals for Alexia)

Participants and results[edit]

R/O Country Artist Song Language[7][8] Points Place[9]
1  Spain Serafín "Todo esto es la música" Spanish 37 14
2  Belgium Morgane "Nous, on veut des violons" French 11 20
3  Israel Dafna "Ze Rak Sport" (זה רק ספורט) Hebrew 85 6
4  Turkey Aylin Vatankoş "Yaz Bitti" Turkish 17 19
5  Greece Cleopatra "Olou tou kosmou i Elpida" (Όλου του κόσμου η Ελπίδα) Greek 94 5
6  France Kali Monte la riviè [fr] French, Antillean Creole 73 8
7  Sweden Christer Björkman "I morgon är en annan dag" Swedish 9 22
8  Portugal Dina "Amor d'água fresca" Portuguese 26 17
9  Cyprus Evridiki "Teriazoume" (Ταιριάζουμε) Greek 57 11
10  Malta Mary Spiteri "Little Child" English 123 3
11  Iceland Heart 2 Heart "Nei eða já" Icelandic 80 7
12  Finland Pave "Yamma, yamma" Finnish 4 23
13  Switzerland Daisy Auvray "Mister Music Man" French 32 15
14  Luxembourg Marion Welter and Kontinent "Sou fräi" Luxembourgish 10 21
15  Austria Tony Wegas "Zusammen geh'n" German 63 10
16  United Kingdom Michael Ball "One Step Out of Time" English 139 2
17  Ireland Linda Martin "Why Me?" English 155 1
18  Denmark Lotte Nilsson and Kenny Lübcke "Alt det som ingen ser" Danish 47 12
19  Italy Mia Martini "Rapsodia" Italian 111 4
20 Yugoslavia Extra Nena "Ljubim te pesmama" (Љубим те песмама) Serbian 44 13
21  Norway Merethe Trøan "Visjoner" Norwegian 23 18
22  Germany Wind "Träume sind für alle da" German 27 16
23  Netherlands Humphrey Campbell "Wijs me de weg" Dutch 67 9

Detailed voting results[edit]

Each country had a jury who awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 point(s) for their top ten songs.

Detailed voting results[10][11]
Total score
Spain
Belgium
Israel
Turkey
Greece
France
Sweden
Portugal
Cyprus
Malta
Iceland
Finland
Switzerland
Luxembourg
Austria
United Kingdom
Ireland
Denmark
Italy
Yugoslavia
Norway
Germany
Netherlands
Contestants
Spain 37 1 1 4 6 2 3 3 2 1 1 7 5 1
Belgium 11 3 4 3 1
Israel 85 10 2 8 4 7 4 7 4 8 1 7 2 12 2 4 3
Turkey 17 8 3 6
Greece 94 7 8 7 3 5 12 2 5 10 4 12 7 8 4
France 73 6 12 3 3 7 12 5 6 10 3 6
Sweden 9 1 4 4
Portugal 26 8 2 2 1 5 8
Cyprus 57 3 10 2 2 1 8 2 6 4 8 3 8
Malta 123 12 10 7 12 12 1 8 5 12 8 10 8 3 10 5
Iceland 80 8 4 4 6 6 6 3 5 7 12 5 5 1 6 2
Finland 4 1 3
Switzerland 32 5 12 4 1 10
Luxembourg 10 10
Austria 63 2 8 8 1 3 8 4 10 12 7
United Kingdom 139 5 12 2 10 10 5 6 6 4 6 8 7 12 7 12 8 12 7
Ireland 155 1 7 12 12 10 4 5 12 7 10 6 10 10 8 10 2 2 7 10 10
Denmark 47 4 6 7 1 6 6 3 3 6 5
Italy 111 5 3 12 8 8 10 5 10 12 7 6 12 1 12
Yugoslavia 44 10 6 1 5 2 3 5 4 2 4 2
Norway 23 3 2 1 1 4 5 6 1
Germany 27 6 10 6 2 3
Netherlands 67 7 2 5 7 5 4 7 3 1 5 2 8 4 7

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
4  Italy  Finland,  France,  Netherlands,  Norway
 Malta  Luxembourg,  Portugal,  Spain,  Sweden
 United Kingdom  Austria,  Belgium,  Denmark,  Germany
3  Ireland  Greece,  Malta,  Turkey
2  France  Israel,  Switzerland
 Greece  Cyprus,  Italy
1  Austria  Ireland
 Iceland  United Kingdom
 Israel Yugoslavia
 Switzerland  Iceland

Spokespersons[edit]

Each country announced their votes in the order of performance. The following is a list of spokespersons who announced the votes for their respective country.

  1.  Spain – María Ángeles Balañac
  2.  Belgium – Jacques Olivier
  3.  Israel – Daniel Pe'er
  4.  Greece – Fotini Giannoulatou
  5.  France – Olivier Minne[12]
  6.  Sweden – Jan Jingryd [sv][13]
  7.  Portugal – Ana Zanatti
  8.  Cyprus – Anna Partelidou
  9.  Malta – Joanna Drake[14]
  10.  Iceland – Guðrún Skúladóttir
  11.  Finland – Solveig Herlin
  12.  Switzerland – Michel Stocker
  13.  Luxembourg – TBC
  14.  Austria – Andy Lee
  15.  United Kingdom – Colin Berry[6]
  16.  Ireland – Eileen Dunne
  17.  Denmark – Bent Henius [dk]
  18.  Italy – Nicoletta Orsomando
  19. Yugoslavia – Veselin Mrđen
  20.  Norway – Sverre Christophersen [no]
  21.  Germany – Carmen Nebel
  22.  Netherlands – Herman Slager

Broadcasts[edit]

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[15] The contest was broadcast in 44 countries, including Australia, New Zealand and South Korea.[6][16] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF FS1 Ernst Grissemann [de] [17][18][19]
 Belgium RTBF RTBF1 Claude Delacroix [20][21][22][23]
BRTN BRTN TV1 André Vermeulen [21][22][24]
 Cyprus CyBC Unknown Evi Papamichail [25][26]
 Denmark DR DR TV Jørgen de Mylius [27][28]
DR P3 Jesper Bæhrenz and Andrew Jensen [dk]
 Finland YLE YLE TV1 Erkki Pohjanheimo and Kati Bergman [29][30][31]
Radiomafia Pekka and Pätkä
 France France Télévision Antenne 2 Thierry Beccaro [18][21][32][33]
 Germany ARD Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Jan Hofer [21][22][34][35]
 Greece ERT Unknown Dafni Bokota [36][37]
 Iceland RÚV Sjónvarpið Árni Snævarr [38][39]
 Ireland RTÉ Unknown Pat Kenny [40][41][42]
Unknown Larry Gogan
 Israel IBA Unknown Unknown [43]
 Italy RAI Rai Due[a] Peppi Franzelin [it] [45][44][46]
 Luxembourg CLT Unknown Unknown [47]
 Malta PBS TVM and Radio Malta 2 Anna Bonanno [14][48][49]
 Netherlands NOS Nederland 3 Willem van Beusekom [22][50]
 Norway NRK NRK John Andreassen [51][52][53]
NRK P2 Leif Erik Forberg and Vidar Lønn-Arnesen
 Portugal RTP RTP Canal 1 Eládio Clímaco [54][55][56]
 Spain TVE La 2 José Luis Uribarri [57][58][59]
 Sweden SVT TV2 Jesper Aspegren [sv] [13][30][52][60]
RR [sv] SR P3 Kalle Oldby and Lotta Engberg [13]
 Switzerland SRG SSR TV DRS Mariano Tschuor [18][32][61][62]
TSR[b] Ivan Frésard [fr]
TSI[b] Unknown
 Turkey TRT Unknown Unknown [63]
 United Kingdom BBC BBC1 Terry Wogan [6][64][65][66]
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Yugoslavia JRT Unknown Unknown [67]
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Australia SBS SBS TV[c] Unknown [68]
 Czechoslovakia ČT F1[d] Unknown [69]
 Estonia ETV Unknown [30][31]
 Hungary MTV MTV1 István Vágó [70]
 Poland TVP TVP1 Artur Orzech and Maria Szabłowska [pl] [71][72]
 Russia RTR RTR Unknown [30][31][73]
 Slovenia RTV SLO SLO 1 [sl] Unknown [74]

Note[edit]

  1. ^ Delayed broadcast at 23:50 CEST (21:50 UTC)[44]
  2. ^ a b Broadcast through a second audio program on SF DRS[61]
  3. ^ Delayed broadcast on 10 May 1992 at 20:30 AEST (10:30 UTC)[68]
  4. ^ Delayed broadcast on 15 May 1992 at 21:35 CEST (19:35 UTC)[68]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Watch Now #EurovisionAgain: Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. 21 August 2021. Archived from the original on 21 August 2021.
  2. ^ O'Connor, John Kennedy. The Eurovision Song Contest - The Official Celebration. Carlton Books, 2015. ISBN 978-1-78097-638-9. Pages 32-33
  3. ^ Statistics Sweden. "Landareal per tätort, folkmängd och invånare per kvadratkilometer. Vart femte år 1960 – 2015" [Land area per urban area, population and per square kilometer. Every five years, 1960 – 2015]. Statistics Sweden. Archived from the original on 12 June 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2017.
  4. ^ "Malmö 1992".
  5. ^ "And the conductor is..." Retrieved 10 September 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d Roxburgh, Gordon (2020). Songs For Europe - The United Kingdom at the Eurovision Song Contest. Volume Four: The 1990s. UK: Telos Publishing. pp. 96–110. ISBN 978-1-84583-163-9.
  7. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1992". The Diggiloo Thrush. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  8. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1992". 4Lyrics.eu. Retrieved 16 September 2020.
  9. ^ "Final of Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 18 April 2021. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  10. ^ "Results of the Final of Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 18 April 2021. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  11. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1992 – Scoreboard". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  12. ^ "Introducing Hosts: Carla, Élodie Gossuin and Olivier Minne". European Broadcasting Union. 18 December 2021. Archived from the original on 19 December 2021. Retrieved 10 October 2022. Olivier is no stranger to the Eurovision family, too, having presented the French votes in 1992 and 1993, as well as providing broadcast commentary from 1995 through 1997.
  13. ^ a b c Thorsson, Leif; Verhage, Martin (2006). Melodifestivalen genom tiderna : de svenska uttagningarna och internationella finalerna (in Swedish). Stockholm: Premium Publishing. pp. 228–229. ISBN 91-89136-29-2.
  14. ^ a b "'Great interest' in Malta's 'Little Child'". Times of Malta. 9 May 1992. p. 18.
  15. ^ "The Rules of the Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 4 October 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  16. ^ Mattila, Ilkka (9 May 1992). "Euroviisusirkus on entistä massiivisempi". Helsingin Sanomat (in Finnish). Retrieved 14 November 2022. (subscription required)
  17. ^ "Austria – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  18. ^ a b c "Samedi 9 mai". TV8 (in French). Cheseaux-sur-Lausanne, Switzerland: Ringier. 30 April 1992. pp. 66–71. Retrieved 18 November 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  19. ^ Halbhuber, Axel (22 May 2015). "Ein virtueller Disput der ESC-Kommentatoren". Kurier (in German). Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 8 July 2022.
  20. ^ "Belgium – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  21. ^ a b c d "TV Programma's". De Voorpost (in Dutch). 8 May 1992. p. 15. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  22. ^ a b c d "Radio- en TV-Programma's Zaterdag". Leidse Courant (in Dutch). 9 May 1992. p. 13. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  23. ^ Wynants, Jean-Marie (9 May 1992). "Nous, on veut des chansons! Retour à la foire annuelle à la ritournelle". Le Soir (in French). Archived from the original on 15 November 2022. Retrieved 15 November 2022. (subscription required)
  24. ^ "Jaaroverzicht 1992" (PDF). Belgische Radio- en Televisieomroep Nederlandstalige Uitzendingen (BRTN) (in Dutch). pp. 105–106. Archived (PDF) from the original on 5 September 2019. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  25. ^ "Cyprus – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  26. ^ Karnakis, Kostas (24 February 2019). "H Eυριδίκη επιστρέφει στην... Eurovision! Όλες οι λεπτομέρειες..." AlphaNews (in Greek). Archived from the original on 29 November 2022. Retrieved 29 November 2022.
  27. ^ "Denmark – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  28. ^ "Programoversigt – 09/05/1992" (in Danish). LARM.fm. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  29. ^ "Finland – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  30. ^ a b c d "Televisio & Radio". Helsingin Sanomat (in Finnish). 9 May 1992. pp. D11–D12. Retrieved 14 November 2022. (subscription required)
  31. ^ a b c "Televisiooni nädalakava 4. mai–10. mai". Päevaleht (in Estonian). 1 May 1992. p. 14. Retrieved 28 October 2022 – via DIGAR Eesti artiklid.
  32. ^ a b "Samedi 9 mai". Le Matin (in French). Lausanne, Switzerland: Edipresse. 9 May 1992. p. 28. Retrieved 18 November 2022 – via Scriptorium Digital Library.
  33. ^ "France – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  34. ^ "Jan Hofer sagt "Tschau" zur Tagesschau". egoFM [de] (in German). 14 December 2020. Archived from the original on 25 November 2022. Retrieved 25 November 2022.
  35. ^ "Germany – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  36. ^ "Greece – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  37. ^ "Eurovision 2020: Giorgos Kapoutzidis -Maria Kozakou ston scholiasmo tou diagonismou gia tin ERT" Eurovision 2020: Γιώργος Καπουτζίδης -Μαρία Κοζάκου στον σχολιασμό του διαγωνισμού για την ΕΡΤ (in Greek). Matrix24. 12 February 2020. Archived from the original on 14 February 2020. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  38. ^ "Iceland – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  39. ^ "Á dagskrá – laugurdagur 9. maí". Morgunblaðið (in Icelandic). 8 May 1992. p. 2. Retrieved 18 November 2022 – via Timarit.is.
  40. ^ "Ireland – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 12 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  41. ^ Walsh, Niamh (3 September 2017). "Pat Kenny: 'As Long As People Still Want Me I'll Keep Coming To Work'". evoke.ie. Archived from the original on 8 July 2022. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  42. ^ Sweeney, Ken (18 April 2012). "Larry Gogan loses his Eurovision ticket". Irish Independent. Archived from the original on 8 July 2022. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  43. ^ "Israel – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  44. ^ a b "I programmi di oggi". La Stampa (in Italian). 9 May 1992. p. 19. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  45. ^ "Italy – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  46. ^ Lombardini, Emanuele (28 March 2014). "Peppi Franzelin ci racconta gli ESC 1990 e 1992. E la Cinquetti..." (in Italian). Eurofestival News. Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  47. ^ "Luxembourg – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  48. ^ "Radio Television". Times of Malta. 9 May 1992. p. 18.
  49. ^ "Malta – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  50. ^ "Netherlands – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  51. ^ "Norway – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  52. ^ a b "Radio og TV – lørdag 9. mai". Oppland Arbeiderblad (in Norwegian). 9 May 1992. pp. 60–61. Retrieved 18 November 2022 – via National Library of Norway.
  53. ^ "P2 – Kjøreplan lørdag 9. mai 1992" (in Norwegian). NRK. 9 May 1992. p. 9. Retrieved 18 November 2022 – via National Library of Norway.
  54. ^ "Portugal – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  55. ^ "Programa da televisão". A Comarca de Arganil (in Portuguese). 7 May 1992. p. 8. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  56. ^ Firmino, Tiago (7 April 2018). "O número do dia. Quantos festivais comentou Eládio Clímaco na televisão portuguesa?" (in Portuguese). N-TV. Archived from the original on 4 November 2022. Retrieved 4 November 2022.
  57. ^ "Spain – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  58. ^ "Televisión". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). 9 May 1992. p. 6. Retrieved 29 November 2022.
  59. ^ Albert, Antonio (9 May 1992). "Festival de Eurovisión". El País (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 November 2022.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link) (registration required)
  60. ^ "Sweden – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  61. ^ a b "TV + Radio Samedi". Journal de Jura (in French). 9 May 1992. p. 21. Retrieved 18 November 2022 – via e-newspaperarchives.ch.
  62. ^ "Switzerland – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  63. ^ "Turkey – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  64. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest – BBC One". Radio Times. 9 May 1992. Retrieved 18 November 2022 – via BBC Genome Project.
  65. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest – BBC Radio 2". Radio Times. 9 May 1992. Retrieved 18 November 2022 – via BBC Genome Project.
  66. ^ "United Kingdom – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 12 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  67. ^ "Yugoslavia – Malmö 1992". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 13 May 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  68. ^ a b c "Today's television". The Canberra Times. Canberra, Australia. 10 May 1992. p. 28. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  69. ^ "Televízió – Kűlfőldi tévéműsorok – péntek május 15". Rádió és TeleVízió újság (in Hungarian). 11 May 1993. p. 47. Archived from the original on 27 November 2022. Retrieved 21 November 2022 – via MTVA Archívum.
  70. ^ "Televízió – szombat május 9". Rádió és TeleVízió újság (in Hungarian). 4 May 1992. p. 50. Archived from the original on 23 July 2022. Retrieved 23 July 2022 – via MTVA Archívum.
  71. ^ "Telewizja Polska – sobota, 9 maja" (PDF). Kurier Wileński (in Polish). 2 May 1992. p. 8. Retrieved 28 October 2022 – via Polonijna Biblioteka Cyfrowa.
  72. ^ "Marek Sierocki i Aleksander Sikora skomentują Eurowizję! Co za duet!". pomponik.pl (in Polish). 30 April 2021. Archived from the original on 30 April 2021. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  73. ^ "Televideniye" Телевидение (PDF). Pravda (in Russian). 9 May 1992. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 17 May 2017. Retrieved 18 November 2022.
  74. ^ "Sobota, 9. maja 1992" (PDF). Gorenjski glas (in Slovenian). 8 May 1992. p. 15. Archived (PDF) from the original on 27 October 2022. Retrieved 26 October 2022.

External links[edit]