Eurovision Song Contest 1994

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Eurovision Song Contest 1994
ESC 1994 logo.png
Dates
Final30 April 1994
Host
VenuePoint Theatre,
Dublin, Ireland
Presenter(s)Cynthia Ní Mhurchú
Gerry Ryan
Musical directorNoel Kelehan
Directed byPatrick Cowap
Executive supervisorChristian Clausen
Executive producerMoya Doherty
Host broadcasterRaidió Teilifís Éireann (RTÉ)
Opening actWalpurgisnacht performance by Macnas, followed by dancing caricatures of Irish artists and celebrities, accompanied by flag bearers featuring the flags of all 25 competing nations
Interval actRiverdance performed by Irish dancing champions Jean Butler, Michael Flatley and the vocal ensemble Anúna, with score composed by Bill Whelan
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/dublin-1994 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries25
Debuting countries Estonia
 Hungary
 Lithuania
 Poland
 Romania
 Russia
 Slovakia
Returning countriesNone
Non-returning countries Belgium
 Denmark
 Israel
 Italy
 Luxembourg
 Slovenia
 Turkey
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song ContestItaly in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Denmark in the Eurovision Song ContestFinland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Israel in the Eurovision Song ContestGreece in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Turkey in the Eurovision Song ContestYugoslavia in the Eurovision Song ContestMorocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Slovenia in the Eurovision Song ContestEstonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Slovakia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Hungary in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Romania in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Lithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Poland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1994A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1994
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points Lithuania
Winning song Ireland
"Rock 'n' Roll Kids"
1993 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1995

The Eurovision Song Contest 1994 was the 39th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Dublin, Ireland, following the country's victory at the 1993 contest with the song "In Your Eyes" by Niamh Kavanagh. It was the fifth time that Ireland had hosted the contest, having previously done so in 1971, 1981, 1988 and 1993. It was the first time that the same country had hosted the contest two years in a row. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Raidió Teilifís Éireann (RTÉ), the contest was held at the Point Theatre, with the final on 30 April 1994. The live show was presented by Cynthia Ní Mhurchú and Gerry Ryan.

Twenty-five countries participated in the contest, equalling the record of the 1993 edition. A total of seven countries took part in the contest for the first time; Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Russia and Slovakia. To cope with the increasing number of countries wishing to participate in the contest, the EBU ruled that the seven lowest-placed countries from the preceding year's contest would not participate. Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Israel, Luxembourg, Slovenia and Turkey were all meant to be relegated based on these new rules, however, due to the withdrawal of Italy, Cyprus avoided relegation. Italy would not return to the contest until three years later.[1]

The winner was Ireland with the song "Rock 'n' Roll Kids", performed by Paul Harrington and Charlie McGettigan, and written by Brendan Graham. This was Ireland's sixth victory in the contest, following their wins in 1970, 1980, 1987, 1992 and 1993. This was a record third year in a row that Ireland won the contest. It was also a record sixth win, making Ireland the country with the most wins in Eurovision history at this point. Poland, Germany, Hungary and Malta rounded out the top five. Poland achieved the best result for a debut entry since 1957, and would remain as the record holder in that regard until 2007.

For the first time in Eurovision history, voting was done via satellite instead of by telephone, and as a result, viewers could see the spokespeople onscreen.[2]

Location[edit]

The Point Theatre, Dublin – host venue of the 1994 contest.

Ireland hosted the contest for the fifth time after winning the 1993 contest in Millstreet. Dublin was chosen to be the host city, making it the fourth time that the Eurovision Song Contest was staged in the Irish capital. For the first time, the venue for the contest was the Point Theatre located on the North Wall Quay of the River Liffey, amongst the Dublin Docklands.

Contest overview[edit]

As of 2021, it is to date the last time the contest has been held in April.

The contest opened with a brief film starring Macnas, a popular street group celebrating Walpurgis Night, with a replica Viking longboat sailing through the river Liffey with stars floating in water, fireworks and various caricatures dancing around various central Dublin locations. The cameras then went live to the venue itself, where dancers dressed in white and wearing caricatured heads of well-known Irish figures, arrived on stage carrying European countries’ flags. The presenters entered the stage spectacularly from a bridge which descended from the roof of the theatre.

This year's video postcards had a literary theme, showing contestants reading, fishing and doing other activities around Ireland. The stage, by Paula Farrell, was four times larger than the Millstreet stage, and its design which included a city scene of skyscrapers and video screens plus a backdrop of an ever-changing night sky was based upon the concept of what a futuristic Dublin might look like with one remaining constant being the river Liffey. The floor was painted with dark blue reflective paint to give a watery effect resembling Dublin bay.

During the dress rehearsal, Polish representative Edyta Górniak broke the contest's rules by singing her song in English. The dress rehearsal is the performance shown to the juries who would select the winner. Only six countries demanded that Poland should be disqualified, though the rules required thirteen countries to complain before Poland could be removed from the competition. The proposed removal did not occur and Poland went on to come 2nd in the contest, the highest placing that any country's debut song had ever achieved until 2007 (the winner in 1956 was Switzerland's second song of the night).[3][4]

When the voting started, Hungary took the lead from the first six juries and were well ahead of all the other countries. However, Ireland powered their way through the score board ending up the winners with a 60-point lead over second-placed Poland.

The interval act was the first-ever performance of the Irish dancing spectacular Riverdance, featuring Michael Flatley and Jean Butler.

Participating countries[edit]

Returning artists[edit]

Artist Country Previous Year(s)
Evridiki  Cyprus 1983 (backing singer for Stavros & Constantina), 1987 (backing singer for Alexia), 1992
Sigga  Iceland 1990 (part of Stjórnin), 1992 (part of Heart 2 Heart)
Elisabeth Andreasson (along with Jan Werner Danielsen)  Norway 1982 (for  Sweden, part of Chips)
1985 (part of Bobbysocks!)
Marie Bergman (along with Roger Pontare)  Sweden 1971 & 1972 (both times part of Family Four)
Rhonda Heath (Backing for MeKaDo)  Germany 1977 (part of Silver Convention)

Conductors[edit]

With the exception of Ireland, each performance had a conductor who directed the orchestra. Eurovision veteran, Ireland's Noel Kelehan (who was the musical director) conducted the songs from three countries, but did not conduct the song from his home country.[a]

Results[edit]

Draw Country Artist Song Language[6][7] Place[8] Points
01  Sweden Marie Bergman & Roger Pontare "Stjärnorna" Swedish 13 48
02  Finland CatCat "Bye Bye Baby" Finnish[b] 22 11
03  Ireland Paul Harrington & Charlie McGettigan "Rock 'n' Roll Kids" English 1 226
04  Cyprus Evridiki "Ime anthropos ki ego" (Είμαι άνθρωπος κι εγώ) Greek 11 51
05  Iceland Sigga "Nætur" Icelandic 12 49
06  United Kingdom Frances Ruffelle "We Will Be Free (Lonely Symphony)" English 10 63
07  Croatia Tony Cetinski "Nek' ti bude ljubav sva" Croatian 16 27
08  Portugal Sara Tavares "Chamar a música" Portuguese 8 73
09   Switzerland Duilio "Sto pregando" Italian 19 15
10  Estonia Silvi Vrait "Nagu merelaine" Estonian 24 2
11  Romania Dan Bittman "Dincolo de nori" Romanian 21 14
12  Malta Chris and Moira "More than Love" English 5 97
13  Netherlands Willeke Alberti "Waar is de zon" Dutch 23 4
14  Germany MeKaDo "Wir geben 'ne Party" German[b] 3 128
15  Slovakia Tublatanka "Nekonečná pieseň" Slovak 19 15
16  Lithuania Ovidijus Vyšniauskas "Lopšinė mylimai" Lithuanian 25 0
17  Norway Elisabeth Andreasson & Jan Werner Danielsen "Duett" Norwegian 6 76
18  Bosnia and Herzegovina Alma & Dejan "Ostani kraj mene" Bosnian 15 39
19  Greece Kostas Bigalis & The Sea Lovers "To trehandiri" (Το τρεχαντήρι) Greek 14 44
20  Austria Petra Frey "Für den Frieden der Welt" German 17 19
21  Spain Alejandro Abad "Ella no es ella" Spanish 18 17
22  Hungary Friderika Bayer "Kinek mondjam el vétkeimet?" Hungarian 4 122
23  Russia Youddiph "Vechny strannik" (Вечный странник) Russian 9 70
24  Poland Edyta Górniak "To nie ja!" Polish 2 166
25  France Nina Morato "Je suis un vrai garçon" French 7 74

Voting structure[edit]

Each country had a jury who awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 point(s) for their top ten songs.

With advances in technology, this was the first contest in which the spokesperson for each national jury appeared on-screen, live from their own countries.

In the early stages of the voting it looked as if Hungary was surging to victory in its first-ever Eurovision appearance, winning the maximum twelve points from the first three juries. However, this turned out to be completely deceptive, as from that point on it was virtually one-way traffic for Ireland, which became the first country to win the contest for a third year in succession.

Scoreboard[edit]

Voting results[9]
Total score
Sweden
Finland
Ireland
Cyprus
Iceland
United Kingdom
Croatia
Portugal
Switzerland
Estonia
Romania
Malta
Netherlands
Germany
Slovakia
Lithuania
Norway
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Greece
Austria
Spain
Hungary
Russia
Poland
France
Contestants
Sweden 48 2 7 2 3 6 5 5 10 5 1 2
Finland 11 1 10
Ireland 226 10 7 8 12 10 12 12 12 10 8 5 12 12 6 10 12 10 10 10 10 12 8 8
Cyprus 51 10 3 5 2 5 12 4 2 5 3
Iceland 49 8 1 6 6 3 3 1 3 3 6 1 4 4
United Kingdom 63 1 5 6 8 8 5 2 4 3 2 4 1 3 3 5 3
Croatia 27 10 12 5
Portugal 73 5 5 8 8 8 5 1 3 12 7 4 1 6
Switzerland 15 8 2 5
Estonia 2 2
Romania 14 6 2 6
Malta 97 4 6 10 2 1 7 4 6 7 10 1 3 10 7 12 7
Netherlands 4 4
Germany 128 6 3 5 6 7 7 10 10 3 12 4 7 4 1 7 2 8 12 7 7
Slovakia 15 12 3
Lithuania 0
Norway 76 7 3 10 1 4 3 1 8 4 7 2 1 6 1 5 5 8
Bosnia and Herzegovina 39 2 4 7 8 7 1 10
Greece 44 2 4 12 6 4 1 5 4 4 2
Austria 19 1 7 3 2 1 5
Spain 17 5 2 8 2
Hungary 122 12 12 12 10 2 5 1 4 4 2 10 7 8 3 8 3 12 7
Russia 70 4 3 4 5 1 2 1 3 5 6 6 3 4 6 6 10 1
Poland 166 8 7 1 6 12 8 7 10 12 7 2 8 10 4 12 6 8 12 8 6 12
France 74 3 2 4 5 6 6 8 8 7 2 7 10 6

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of all 12 point in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
8  Ireland  Croatia,  Germany,  Iceland,  Netherlands,  Norway,  Portugal,  Russia,   Switzerland
5  Poland  Austria,  Estonia,  France,  Lithuania,  United Kingdom
4  Hungary  Ireland,  Finland,  Poland,  Sweden
2  Germany  Hungary,  Romania
1  Croatia  Slovakia
 Cyprus  Greece
 Greece  Cyprus
 Malta  Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Portugal  Spain
 Slovakia  Malta

International broadcasting[edit]

Other involved countries[edit]

 FR Yugoslavia
After the breakup of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia had participated in the 1992 contest. While the country did not participate, the third channel of Radio Television of Serbia broadcast the show.

Commentators[edit]

Television[edit]

Participating countries[edit]

Non-participating countries[edit]

Radio[edit]

Participating countries[edit]

The participating countries that provided radio broadcasts for the event are listed below.

Non-participating countries[edit]

Spokespersons[edit]

National jury members[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Both Irish commentator Pat Kenny[5] and British commentator Terry Wogan credit Kelehan as the conductor of the Irish entry, only Kenny specifies he only leads a minimal arrangement of drums and bass. Nevertheless, he didn't take the traditional conductor's bow, and virtually no drum or bass accompaniment can be heard during the performance.
  2. ^ a b Contains some words in English

References[edit]

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  2. ^ "Winners of the 1990s - What happened to them?". Eurovision.tv. Retrieved 9 November 2014.
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  4. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1994". Eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 9 November 2014.
  5. ^ "ESC 1994 - Irish comments (RTÉ)". YouTube. Retrieved 7 June 2020.
  6. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1994". The Diggiloo Thrush. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  7. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1994". 4Lyrics.eu. Retrieved 16 September 2020.
  8. ^ "Final of Dublin 1994". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  9. ^ "Results of the Final of Dublin 1994". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  10. ^ a b "Infosajten.com". Infosajten.com. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  11. ^ "Selostajat ja taustalaulajat läpi vuosien? • Viisukuppila". Viisukuppila.fi. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  12. ^ Itä-Eurooppa rynnii Euroviisuihin, Helsingin Sanomat, 30 April 1994
  13. ^ a b Savvidis, Christos (OGAE Cyprus)
  14. ^ "Morgunblaðið, 28.04.1994". Timarit.is. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
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  18. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1994". Ecgermany.de. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  19. ^ "Alt du trenger å vite om MGP - Melodi Grand Prix - Melodi Grand Prix - NRK". Nrk.no. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
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  21. ^ [1] Archived October 24, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
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  23. ^ "Zobacz temat - Eurowizyjna gra". Eurowizja.Com.Pl. Archived from the original on 2012-03-23. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  24. ^ a b "1994 - Dublin". Songcontest.free.fr. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  25. ^ "Hasselt 2005: Jarige André Vermeulen verzorgt commentaar met Ilse Van Hoecke –". Eurosong.be. 2005-10-25. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  26. ^ "Danske kommentatorer og pointsoplæsere". Esconnet.dk. Archived from the original on 2012-03-24. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  27. ^ "Nostalgični RTV press clipping". rtvforum.net. Archived from the original on 2015-09-29. Retrieved 2015-09-02.
  28. ^ "Selostajat ja taustalaulajat läpi vuosien? • Viisukuppila". Viisukuppila.fi. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  29. ^ "Pogledajte temu - SPOKESPERSONS". forum.hrt.hr. Archived from the original on 2012-03-14. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  30. ^ [2] Archived August 22, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  31. ^ "Pirmojoje nacionalinėje "Eurovizijos" atrankoje dalyvavo ir šiandien pažįstami veidai". lrt.lt. May 18, 2019.
  32. ^ "Εκφωνητές της ΕΡΤ για τις ψήφους της Ελλάδας στην EUROVISION - Page 3". Retromaniax.gr. Archived from the original on 2012-09-11. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
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External links[edit]