Eurovision Song Contest 1999

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Eurovision Song Contest 1999
ESC 1999 logo.jpg
Dates
Final29 May 1999 (1999-05-29)
Host
VenueInternational Convention Centre
Jerusalem, Israel
Presenter(s)
Directed byHagai Mautner
Executive supervisorChristine Marchal-Ortiz
Executive producerAmnon Barkai
Host broadcasterIsrael Broadcasting Authority (IBA)
Opening actDigital animation "From Birmingham to Jerusalem" transitioning into footage of Jerusalem
Interval act"To Life" by Dafna Dekel and Sigal Shachmon
"Freedom Calls" featuring Dana International
Reprise actEnglish version of 1979 winning song "Hallelujah" performed by all competing artists
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/jerusalem-1999 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries23
Returning countries
Non-returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Italy in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Switzerland in the Eurovision Song ContestGermany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Finland in the Eurovision Song ContestNorway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Greece in the Eurovision Song ContestMalta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song ContestMorocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestHungary in the Eurovision Song ContestRomania in the Eurovision Song ContestLithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Poland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Russia in the Eurovision Song ContestMacedonia in the Eurovision Song ContestA coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1999
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8–1 points to their ten favourite songs
Nul points in finalNone
Winning song
1998 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2000

The Eurovision Song Contest 1999 was the 44th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest, held on 29 May 1999 at the International Convention Centre in Jerusalem, Israel. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA) and presented by singer Dafna Dekel, radio and television presenter Yigal Ravid and model and television presenter Sigal Shachmon, the contest was held in Israel following the country's victory at the 1998 contest with the song "Diva" by Dana International.

Twenty-three countries participated in the contest. Finland, Greece, Hungary, Macedonia, Romania, Slovakia and Switzerland, having participated in the 1998 contest, were absent due to being relegated after achieving the lowest average points totals over the past five contests or by actively choosing not to return. Meanwhile Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark and Iceland returned to the contest, having last participated in 1997, while Lithuania made its first contest appearance since 1994.

The winner was Sweden with the song "Take Me to Your Heaven", composed by Lars Diedricson, written by Gert Lengstrand and performed by Charlotte Nilsson. Iceland, Germany, Croatia and Israel rounded out the top five, with Iceland achieving its best ever result and Croatia equalling its previous best. It was the first contest since 1976 that countries were allowed to perform in the language of their choice, and not necessary the language of their country, and also the first ever contest to not feature an orchestra or live music accompanying the competing entries.

Location[edit]

International Convention Centre, Jerusalem – host venue of the 1999 contest

The 1999 contest took place in Jerusalem, Israel, following the country's victory at the 1998 edition with the song "Diva", performed by Dana International. It was the second time that Israel had staged the contest, following the 1979 contest also held in Jerusalem.[1] The selected venue was the Ussishkin Auditorium of the International Convention Centre, commonly known in Hebrew as Binyenei HaUma (Hebrew: בנייני האומה), which also served as the host venue for Israel's previous staging of the event.[2][3]

The prospect of Israel staging the contest resulted in protest by members of the Orthodox Jewish community in the country, including opposition by the deputy mayor of Jerusalem Haim Miller to the contest being staged in the city.[4][5] Additional concerns over funding for the event also contributed to speculation that the contest could be moved to Malta or the United Kingdom, the nations which had finished in the top three alongside Israel the previous year.[6] Financial guarantees by the Israeli government however helped to ensure that the contest would take place in Israel. The possibility of holding the event in an open air venue was discussed, however concerns over security led to the choice of an indoor venue for the event.[3]

Production[edit]

Two of the contest's presenters, Dafna Dekel (left) and Sigal Shachmon, during the contest

The Eurovision Song Contest 1999 was produced by the Israeli public broadcaster Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA). Amnon Barkai served as executive producer, Aharon Goldfinger-Eldar served as producer, Hagai Mautner served as director and Maya Hanoch [he], Mia Raveh and Ronen Levin served as designers.[7] Usually able to hold a maximum of 3,000 people, modifications made to the Ussishkin Auditorium reduced the capacity to around 2,000 for the contest, with rows of seats removed from the floor to make room for the stage and from the balcony to allow for the construction of boxes for use by various commentators.[3][8]

Rehearsals in the venue for the competing acts began on 24 May 1999. Each country had two technical rehearsals in the week approaching the contest: the first rehearsals took place on 24 and 25 May, with each country allowed 40 minutes total on stage followed by a 20 minute press conference; the second rehearsals subsequently took place on 26 and 27 May, with each country allocated 30 minutes on stage.[3] Each country took to the stage in the order in which they would perform, however due to budget concerns the Lithuanian delegation was permitted to arrive in Israel one day later than the other delegations.[9] Subsequently the first day's rehearsals began with Belgium as the second country to be performed in the contest, with Lithuania being the last country to complete their first rehearsal on the second day; for the second rehearsals the order was corrected and Lithuania was scheduled first on stage. Additional rehearsals took place on 26 May for the contest's concluding performance with all artists, and on 27 May for the contest's presenters and to test the voting scoreboard's computer graphics. Two dress rehearsals held on 28 May were held with an audience, the latter of which was also recorded for use as a production stand-by in case of problems during the live contest. A further dress rehearsal took place on the afternoon of 29 May ahead of the live contest, followed by security and technical checks.[3]

Singer Dafna Dekel, radio and television presenter Yigal Ravid and model and television presenter Sigal Shachmon were the presenters of the 1999 contest, the first time that three presenters had been involved in a single edition.[10] Dekel had previously represented Israel in the 1992 contest and placed sixth with the song "Ze Rak Sport".[11] The writers of the winning song were awarded with a trophy designed by Yaacov Agam, which was presented by the previous year's winning artist Dana International.[12][13][14]

The show began with a computer animation entitled "From Birmingham to Jerusalem", highlighting the contest's journey from last year's host country the United Kingdom to Israel and containing notable landmarks and features of the competing countries; the animation then transitioned into recorded footage of Jerusalem including dancers and hosts Dekel and Shachmon.[12] The contest's opening segment also featured Izhar Cohen and Gali Atari, Israel's previous winning artists from the 1978 and 1979 contests attending as special guests, and the previous year's co-presenter Terry Wogan in attendance as the United Kingdom's television commentator.[12][15] A pause between entries was included for the first time to allow broadcasters to provide advertisements during the show;[10] placed between the Polish and Icelandic entries, entertainment was provided during the break for the benefit of the audience in the arena and for non-commercial broadcasters featuring co-presenters Dekel and Shachmon and a performance of the song "To Life" from the musical Fiddler on the Roof.[12][15] The contest's pre-recorded interval act entitled "Freedom Calls", shown following the final competing entry and during the voting window, was staged outside the Walls of Jerusalem and the Tower of David and featured performances by a troupe of dancers, a chorus and Dana International singing the D'ror Yikra and a cover of "Free", originally recorded by Stevie Wonder.[5][14][12] Following the traditional reprise performance of the winning song, the show finished with a performance of the English version of Israel's 1979 contest winning song "Hallelujah" involving all the competing artists as a tribute to the victims of the then-ongoing Kosovo War and to the people of the Balkans who were unable to watch the contest following the bombing of television services in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.[2][10]

Cover art of the contest's compilation album

A compilation album featuring many of the competing entries was released in Israel following the contest, commissioned by IBA and released through the Israeli record label IMP Records. The release contained nineteen of the twenty-three competing acts on CD and an additional video CD with clips from the televised broadcast and footage from backstage. The entries from Cyprus, the Netherlands, Poland and the United Kingdom were absent due to the record label failing to secure the necessary rights for these songs.[16][17]

Format[edit]

Entries[edit]

Each participating broadcaster was represented in the contest by one song, which was required to be no longer than three minutes in duration. A maximum of six performers were allowed on stage during each country's performance, and all performers must have reached the age of 16 in the year of the contest. Selected entries were not permitted to be released commercially before 1 January 1999, and were then only allowed to be released in the country they represented until after the contest was held. Entries were required to be selected by each country's participating broadcaster by 15 March, and the final submission date for all selected entries to be received by the contest organisers was set for 29 March. This submission was required to include a sound recording of the entry and backing track for use during the contest, a video presentation of the song on stage being performed by the artists, and the text of the song lyrics in its original language and translations in French and English for distribution to the participating broadcasters, their commentators and juries.[18]

For the first time since the 1976 contest the participants had full freedom to perform in any language, and not simply that of the country they represented.[a][2][10][19] Additionally the rules were modified to make the orchestra a non-obligatory feature of the contest of which organising broadcasters were free to opt out.[18] IBA chose not to provide an orchestra, resulting in all entries being performed via backing tracks and no live music featuring for the first time in the contest's history.[10] No orchestra has been included as part of the competition since, and in subsequent years the rules were modified again to entirely remove the option for entries to be accompanied by live music.[3][20]

Following the confirmation of the twenty-three competing countries the draw to determine the running order was held on 17 November 1998.[3][21]

Voting procedure[edit]

The results of the 1999 contest were determined through the same scoring system as had first been introduced in 1975: each country awarded twelve points to its favourite entry, followed by ten points to its second favourite, and then awarded points in decreasing value from eight to one for the remaining songs which featured in the country's top ten, with countries unable to vote for their own entry.[21][22] Each participating country was required to use televoting to determine their points.[21][23] Viewers had a total of five minutes to register their vote by calling one of twenty-two different telephone numbers to represent the twenty-three competing entries except that which represented their own country, with voting lines opening following the performance of the last competing entry.[12][18] Once phone lines were opened a video recap containing short clips of each competing entry with the accompanying phone number for voting was shown in order to aid viewers during the voting window.[12] Systems were also put in place to prevent lobby groups from one country voting for their song by travelling to other countries.[18]

Countries which were unable to hold a televote due to technological limitations were granted an exception, and their points were determined by an assembled jury of eight individuals, which was required to be split evenly between members of the public and music professionals, comprised additionally of an equal number of men and women, and below and above 30 years of age. Countries using televoting were also required to appoint a back-up jury of the same composition which would be called into action upon technical failure preventing the televote results from being used. Each jury member voted in secret and awarded between one and ten votes to each participating song, excluding that from their own country and with no abstentions permitted. The votes of each member were collected following the country's performance and then tallied by the non-voting jury chairperson to determine the points to be awarded. In any cases where two or more songs in the top ten received the same number of votes, a show of hands by all jury members was used to determine the final placing; if a tie still remained, the youngest jury member would have the deciding vote.[21]

Postcards[edit]

Each entry was preceded by a video postcard which served as an introduction to the competing artists from each country, as well as providing an opportunity to showcase the running artistic theme of the event and creating a transition between entries to allow stage crew to make changes on stage.[24][25] The postcards for the 1999 contest featured animations of paintings of biblical stories which transitioned into footage of modern locations in Israel or clips representing specific themes related to modern Israeli culture and industries. The various locations and themes for each postcard are listed below by order of performance:[12]

  1.  Lithuania – Jacob's Ladder; Israel Museum, Jerusalem
  2.  Belgium – Pharaoh and his Army; Eilat
  3.  Spain – Noah's Ark; landscapes of Galilee
  4.  Croatia – Ruth; Israeli agriculture
  5.  United Kingdom – Jonah and the Whale; Jaffa
  6.  Slovenia – Adam and Eve; Israeli fashion
  7.  Turkey – The Sea of Galilee; Tiberias and surroundings
  8.  Norway – Workers of the Tabernacle; Israeli tech and virtual reality
  9.  Denmark – Joseph and His Brothers; Haifa
  10.  France – The Golden Calf; Israeli jewellery industry
  11.  Netherlands – The Prophet; Tel Aviv nightlife
  12.  Poland – David and Goliath; Israeli sports
  13.  Iceland – The Manna from Heaven; Israeli culinary
  14.  Cyprus – The Basket of Moses; rafting on the Jordan River
  15.  Sweden – David and Bathsheba; music and art on the roofs of Tel Aviv
  16.  Portugal – Daniel and the Lions; Acre
  17.  Ireland – Cain and Abel; Judaean Desert
  18.  Austria – The Judgement of Solomon; Jerusalem
  19.  Israel – The Promised Land; Jezreel Valley
  20.  Malta – David and Michal; Suzanne Dellal Centre for Dance and Theatre, Tel Aviv
  21.  Germany – The Tower of Babel; Israeli beaches
  22.  Bosnia and Herzegovina – Samson; Caesarea National Park
  23.  Estonia – The Zodiac mosaic at the Old Beth Alfa Synagogue; love at the Dead Sea

Participating countries[edit]

Per the rules of the contest twenty-three countries were allowed to participate in the event, a reduction on the twenty-five which took part in the 1997 and 1998 contests.[3][21] Lithuania made its first appearance since 1994, and Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark and Iceland returned after being relegated from the previous year's event.[3] Russia was unable to return from relegation due to failing to broadcast the 1998 contest, as specified in the rules for that edition.[3][26] 1998 participants Finland, Greece, Hungary, Macedonia, Romania, Slovakia and Switzerland were absent from this edition.[2][3]

Qualification[edit]

Due to the high number of countries wishing to enter the contest a relegation system was introduced in 1993 in order to reduce the number of countries which could compete in each year's contest. Any relegated countries would be able to return the following year, thus allowing all countries the opportunity to compete in at least one in every two editions.[27] The relegation rules introduced for the 1997 contest were again utilised ahead of the 1999 contest, based on each country's average points total in previous contests. The twenty-three participants were made up of the previous year's winning country and host nation, the seventeen countries which had obtained the highest average points total over the preceding five contests, and any eligible countries which did not compete in the 1998 contest. In cases where the average was identical between two or more countries the total number of points scored in the most recent contest determined the final order.[21]

A new addition to the relegation rules specified that for the 2000 contest and future editions the four largest financial contributors to the contest – Germany, the United Kingdom, France and Spain – would automatically qualify each year and be exempt from relegation.[21] This new "Big Four" group of countries was created to ensure the financial viability of the event and was prompted by a number of poor results in previous years for some of the countries, which if occurred again in 1999 could have resulted in those countries being eliminated.[3][6]

Finland, Greece, Hungary, Macedonia, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and Switzerland were therefore excluded from participating in the 1999 contest, to make way for the return of Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark, Iceland and Lithuania, and new debuting country Latvia. However Latvia's Latvijas Televīzija subsequently withdrew its participation at a late stage, and their place in the contest was subsequently offered to Hungary as the excluded country with the highest average points total. Hungarian broadcaster Magyar Televízió declined the offer, which then passed to Portugal's Rádio e Televisão de Portugal as the next country in line, which accepted the invitation.[2][3][6]

The calculations used to determine the countries relegated for the 1999 contest are outlined in the table below.

Table key

  Qualifier
  Automatic qualifier
  Replacement qualifier
  Did not enter
Calculation of average points to determine qualification for the 1999 contest[b]
Rank Country Average Yearly Point Totals[28][29][30][31][32]
1994 1995 1996 1997 1998
1  Ireland 130.60 226 44 162 157 64
2  Israel 126.50 81 172
3  United Kingdom 121.80 63 76 77 227 166
4  Malta 94.40 97 76 68 66 165
5  Norway 83.40 76 148 114 0 79
6  Croatia 74.20 27 91 98 24 131
7[c]  Sweden 67.40 48 100 100 36 53
8[c]  Cyprus 67.40 51 79 72 98 37
9  Netherlands 59.25 4 78 5 150
10  Germany 59.25 128 1 22 86
11  Poland 57.00 166 15 31 54 19
12  France 56.80 74 94 18 95 3
13  Turkey 56.00 21 57 121 25
14  Spain 54.00 17 119 17 96 21
15  Estonia 53.50 2 94 82 36
16  Belgium 50.67 8 22 122
17  Slovenia 44.25 84 16 60 17
18  Hungary[d] 42.00 122 3 39 4
19  Portugal[d] 41.20 73 5 92 0 36
20  Greece 39.80 44 68 36 39 12
21  Macedonia 16.00 16
22[e]  Finland 14.00 11 9 22
23[e]  Slovakia 14.00 15 19 8
24  Switzerland 10.50 15 22 5 0
25  Romania 10.00 14 6

Returning artists[edit]

Several of the artists taking part in the contest had previously performed as lead artists in past editions. Two of this year's lead artists had previously competed in the contest, with Croatia's Doris Dragović taking part in 1986 representing Yugoslavia, and Slovenia's Darja Švajger making a second appearance for her country following the 1995 contest.[10] A number of former competitors also returned to perform as backing vocalists for some of the competing entries: Stefán Hilmarsson, who represented Iceland twice in 1988 and 1991, provided backing vocals for Selma;[34] Kenny Lübcke, who represented Denmark in 1992, returned to provide backing for Trine Jepsen and Michael Teschl;[35] Christopher Scicluna and Moira Stafrace, who represented Malta in 1994, provided backing for Times Three;[36] Gabriel Fors, who represented Sweden in 1997 as a member of the group Blond, was among Charlotte Nilsson's backing vocalists;[37] and Linda Williams, who represented the Netherlands in 1981, returned as a backing vocalist for Belgium's Vanessa Chinitor.[38] Additionally Evelin Samuel competed for Estonia in this year's contest, having previously served as backing vocalist for Estonia's Maarja-Liis Ilus in 1997.[39]

Participants and results[edit]

Charlotte Nilsson (pictured in 2012) brought Sweden its fourth Eurovision Song Contest victory.

The contest took place on 29 May 1999 at 22:00 (IST) and lasted 3 hours and 13 minutes.[15][21] The table below outlines the participating countries, the order in which they performed, the competing artists and songs, and the results of the voting.

The winner was Sweden represented by the song "Take Me to Your Heaven", composed by Lars Diedricson, written by Gert Lengstrand [sv] and performed by Charlotte Nilsson.[40] This marked Sweden's fourth victory in the contest, following wins in 1974, 1984 and 1991, and occurred 25 years after ABBA brought Sweden its first victory.[23][41] Iceland, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina also achieved their best results to date, placing second, fourth and seventh respectively.[42][43][44]

During the presentation of the trophy to the contest winners Dana International caused a security alert in the auditorium; while lifting the trophy and feigning difficulty due to its weight the singer lost her balance and fell to the stage along with the winning songwriters before being helped up by security agents.[2][6][45]

The Norwegian delegation raised an objection to the use of simulated male vocals during the performance of Croatian entry "Marija Magdalena".[6] Following the contest this was found to have contravened the contest rules regarding the use of vocals on the backing tracks, and Croatia were sanctioned by the EBU with the loss of 33% of their points for the purpose of calculating their average points total for qualification in following contests.[2] The country's position and points at this contest however remain unchanged.[15]

Participants and results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1999[15][46][47]
R/O Country Artist Song Language Points Place
1  Lithuania Aistė "Strazdas" Samogitian 13 20
2  Belgium Vanessa Chinitor "Like the Wind" English 38 12
3  Spain Lydia "No quiero escuchar" Spanish 1 23
4  Croatia Doris Dragović "Marija Magdalena" Croatian 118 4
5  United Kingdom Precious "Say It Again" English 38 12
6  Slovenia Darja Švajger "For a Thousand Years" English 50 11
7  Turkey Tuba Önal and Grup Mistik "Dön Artık" Turkish 21 16
8  Norway Stig Van Eijk "Living My Life Without You" English 35 14
9  Denmark Trine Jepsen and Michael Teschl "This Time I Mean It" English 71 8
10  France Nayah "Je veux donner ma voix" French 14 19
11  Netherlands Marlayne "One Good Reason" English 71 8
12  Poland Mietek Szcześniak "Przytul mnie mocno" Polish 17 18
13  Iceland Selma "All Out of Luck" English 146 2
14  Cyprus Marlain "Tha'nai erotas" (Θα'ναι έρωτας) Greek 2 22
15  Sweden Charlotte Nilsson "Take Me to Your Heaven" English 163 1
16  Portugal Rui Bandeira "Como tudo começou" Portuguese 12 21
17  Ireland The Mullans "When You Need Me" English 18 17
18  Austria Bobbie Singer "Reflection" English 65 10
19  Israel Eden "Yom Huledet (Happy Birthday)" (יום הולדת) English, Hebrew 93 5
20  Malta Times Three "Believe 'n Peace" English 32 15
21  Germany Sürpriz "Reise nach JerusalemKudüs'e Seyahat" German, Turkish, English[f] 140 3
22  Bosnia and Herzegovina Dino and Béatrice "Putnici" Bosnian, French 86 7
23  Estonia Evelin Samuel and Camille "Diamond of Night" English 90 6

Detailed voting results[edit]

Televoting was used to determine the points awarded by all countries, except Lithuania, Turkey, Ireland and Bosnia and Herzegovina.[23] Ireland had intended to use televoting, however technical failures at Telecom Éireann ahead of the voting window meant that the majority of calls were not registered and the country's back-up jury was utilised to determine its points.[48]

The announcement of the results from each country was conducted in the order in which they performed, with the spokespersons announcing their country's points in English or French in ascending order.[12][21] The detailed breakdown of the points awarded by each country is listed in the tables below.

Detailed voting results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1999[23][49][50]
Voting procedure used:
  100% televoting
  100% jury vote
Total score
Lithuania
Belgium
Spain
Croatia
United Kingdom
Slovenia
Turkey
Norway
Denmark
France
Netherlands
Poland
Iceland
Cyprus
Sweden
Portugal
Ireland
Austria
Israel
Malta
Germany
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Estonia
Contestants
Lithuania 13 2 5 3 1 2
Belgium 38 4 2 10 2 10 5 5
Spain 1 1
Croatia 118 6 5 12 12 8 7 1 7 4 2 1 6 6 8 7 5 10 8 3
United Kingdom 38 5 4 5 2 4 1 4 4 8 1
Slovenia 50 10 2 2 12 1 6 12 5
Turkey 21 4 5 12
Norway 35 7 6 7 7 5 3
Denmark 71 5 5 5 1 12 8 8 3 7 5 2 4 6
France 14 2 2 8 2
Netherlands 71 4 12 3 8 3 5 7 6 4 2 1 4 6 2 4
Poland 17 7 4 6
Iceland 146 8 8 10 10 10 10 12 7 4 12 12 4 4 2 10 10 3 10
Cyprus 2 2
Sweden 163 3 7 6 12 7 6 12 10 3 8 6 10 6 10 5 6 8 12 2 12 12
Portugal 12 12
Ireland 18 12 4 1 1
Austria 65 6 7 4 6 3 2 3 8 1 7 5 5 8
Israel 93 3 8 8 1 3 2 2 10 4 10 1 10 3 8 1 6 7 2 4
Malta 32 6 6 3 1 7 1 7 1
Germany 140 10 7 3 1 6 12 3 5 8 12 12 5 2 12 10 12 3 10 7
Bosnia and Herzegovina 86 1 10 10 7 7 8 6 3 5 3 6 12 8
Estonia 90 1 4 1 3 8 5 4 4 5 8 2 10 7 8 3 1 7 6 3

12 points[edit]

The below table summarises how the maximum 12 points were awarded from one country to another. The winning country is shown in bold.

Distribution of 12 points awarded at the Eurovision Song Contest 1999[49][50]
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
5  Germany  Israel,  Netherlands,  Poland,  Portugal,  Turkey
 Sweden  Bosnia and Herzegovina,  Estonia,  Malta,  Norway,  United Kingdom
3  Iceland  Cyprus,  Denmark,  Sweden
2  Croatia  Slovenia,  Spain
 Slovenia  Croatia,  Ireland
1  Bosnia and Herzegovina  Austria
 Denmark  Iceland
 Ireland  Lithuania
 Netherlands  Belgium
 Portugal  France
 Turkey  Germany

Spokespersons[edit]

Each country nominated a spokesperson who was responsible for announcing, in English or French, the votes for their respective country.[21][51] As had been the case since the 1994 contest, the spokespersons were connected via satellite and appeared in vision during the broadcast.[52] Spokespersons at the 1999 contest are listed below.[12]

  1.  Lithuania – Andrius Tapinas
  2.  Belgium – Sabine De Vos [nl]
  3.  Spain – Hugo de Campos
  4.  Croatia – Marko Rašica
  5.  United Kingdom – Colin Berry[23]
  6.  Slovenia – Mira Berginc
  7.  Turkey – Osman Erkan
  8.  Norway – Ragnhild Sælthun Fjørtoft
  9.  Denmark – Kirsten Siggaard[53]
  10.  France – Marie Myriam
  11.  Netherlands – Edsilia Rombley[54]
  12.  Poland – Jan Chojnacki
  13.  Iceland – Áslaug Dóra Eyjólfsdóttir
  14.  Cyprus – Marina Maleni
  15.  Sweden – Pontus Gårdinger[55]
  16.  Portugal – Manuel Luís Goucha
  17.  Ireland – Clare McNamara
  18.  Austria – Dodo Roscic [de]
  19.  Israel – Yoav Ginai [he]
  20.  Malta – Nirvana Azzopardi
  21.  Germany – Renan Demirkan
  22.  Bosnia and Herzegovina – Segmedina Srna
  23.  Estonia – Mart Sander[56]

Broadcasts[edit]

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay live and in full the contest via television. Non-participating EBU member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants"; any passive countries wishing to participate in the following year's event were also required to provide a live broadcast of the contest or a deferred broadcast within 24 hours.[21] Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their viewers. Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators, are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF ORF 1 Andi Knoll [57][58][59][60][61]
FM4 Stermann & Grissemann
 Belgium VRT Unknown André Vermeulen and Bart Peeters [62][63]
RTBF RTBF La Une Jean-Pierre Hautier [64][65][66]
 Bosnia and Herzegovina RTVBiH Unknown Unknown [67]
 Croatia HRT HRT 1 Unknown [68][69]
 Cyprus CyBC Unknown Evi Papamichail [70][71]
 Denmark DR DR1 Keld Heick [72][73][74]
 Estonia ETV Marko Reikop [75][76][77]
ER Raadio 2
 France France Télévision France 3 Julien Lepers [58][78][79]
TV5Monde [73][78][80]
 Germany ARD Das Erste Peter Urban [58][59][81][82]
 Iceland RÚV Sjónvarpið Gísli Marteinn Baldursson [83][84]
 Ireland RTÉ Unknown Pat Kenny [85][86][87][88]
Unknown Larry Gogan
 Israel IBA Unknown Unknown [89]
 Lithuania LRT LRT Unknown [90][91]
 Malta PBS TVM Unknown [92][93]
 Netherlands NOS Nederland 2 Willem van Beusekom [80][94][95]
 Norway NRK NRK1 Jostein Pedersen [73][96][97]
NRK P1 Jon Branæs [no]
 Poland TVP Unknown Artur Orzech [98][99]
 Portugal RTP RTP1 and RTP Internacional Rui Unas [pt] [58][100][101][102]
 Slovenia RTV SLO SLO 1 [sl] Unknown [69][103]
 Spain TVE La Primera and TVE Internacional José Luis Uribarri [58][104][105]
 Sweden SVT SVT2 Pekka Heino and Anders Berglund [40][55][73]
SR SR P3 Carolina Norén [55]
 Turkey TRT Unknown Unknown [106]
 United Kingdom BBC BBC One and BBC Prime Terry Wogan [15][58][107][108][109]
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Australia SBS SBS TV Unknown [110]
 Finland YLE YLE TV1 Jani Juntunen [76][111][112][113]
YLE Radio Suomi Sanna Kojo [114]
YLE Radio Vega Unknown [115]
 Greece ERT Unknown Dafni Bokota [116]
 Latvia LTV Unknown Unknown [117][118]
 Macedonia MRT Unknown Unknown [119]
 Romania TVR TVR 1 Doina Caramzulescu and Costin Grigore [120][121][122]
Radio România Actualități Ana Maria Zaharescu
 Russia ORT Unknown [76][91][123]
Jewish Channel[g] Unknown [124]
 Switzerland SRG SSR SF 2 Sandra Studer [58][59][78][125]
TSR 1 Jean-Marc Richard
TSI 2 Unknown

Other awards[edit]

Barbara Dex Award[edit]

The Barbara Dex Award, created in 1997 by fansite House of Eurovision, was awarded to the performer deemed to have been the "worst dressed" among the participants.[126][127] The winner in 1999 was Spain's representative Lydia, as determined by visitors to the House of Eurovision website.[128] This was the first edition of the award to be determined by site visitors, after the winners in 1997 and 1998 were determined by the founders of the House of Eurovision site Edwin van Thillo and Rob Paardekam.[129][130]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although for the 1977 contest each participant was required to perform in the language of the country they represented, Germany and Belgium were granted exceptions as their entries had already been chosen when the rule was reintroduced.[19]
  2. ^ Determined by totalling all points awarded in the past five contests and dividing by the number of times that country had participated.[21]
  3. ^ a b Despite having the same average score, Sweden ranked higher than Cyprus by virtue of achieving a higher score in the most recent contest.[21]
  4. ^ a b As Latvia withdrew their participation at a late stage the eliminated country with the highest average points total, Hungary, was offered their place. After declining the offer, the place subsequently passed to Portugal as the country with the next highest average points total.[33]
  5. ^ a b Despite having the same average score, Finland ranked higher than Slovakia by virtue of achieving a higher score in the most recent contest.[21]
  6. ^ Contains some words in Hebrew
  7. ^ Delayed broadcast on 5 December 1999[124]

References[edit]

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Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]