Eurovision Song Contest 2002

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Eurovision Song Contest 2002
A Modern Fairytale
Eurovision Song Contest 2002.svg
Dates
Final25 May 2002 (2002-05-25)
Host
VenueSaku Suurhall
Tallinn, Estonia
Presenter(s)
Directed byMarius Bratten
Executive supervisorChristine Marchal-Ortiz
Executive producerJuhan Paadam
Host broadcasterEesti Televisioon (ETV)
Opening act"Everybody" performed by Tanel Padar and Dave Benton
Interval act
  • (During the song presentation): "A Little Story in the Music" performed by Annely Peebo and Marko Matvere, with music composed by Raimond Valgre
  • (During the voting procedure): Dance performance directed and choreographed by Teet Kask.[1]
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/tallinn-2002 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries24
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries
Non-returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Italy in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song ContestSwitzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Ireland in the Eurovision Song ContestDenmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Norway in the Eurovision Song ContestPortugal in the Eurovision Song ContestSweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002France in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song ContestMorocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Iceland in the Eurovision Song ContestBosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestHungary in the Eurovision Song ContestRomania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Lithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Poland in the Eurovision Song ContestRussia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Macedonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002Latvia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 2002
Vote
Voting systemEach country awards 1-8, 10, and 12 points to their 10 favourite countries
Nul pointsNone
Winning song
2001 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2003

The Eurovision Song Contest 2002 was the 47th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Tallinn, Estonia, following the country's victory at the 2001 contest with the song "Everybody" by Tanel Padar, Dave Benton and 2XL. It was the first time Estonia had hosted the contest - 8 years after the country made its debut. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Eesti Televisioon (ETV), the contest was held at the Saku Suurhall, with the final on 25 May 2002. The live show was presented by Annely Peebo and Marko Matvere.[2]

It was the first Eurovision Song Contest held in a Baltic state country, in a former Soviet republic and in a Finno-Ugric language-speaking country.

Twenty-four countries participated in the contest. Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Finland, Macedonia, Romania and Switzerland returned after their relegation from the previous edition. Iceland, Ireland, Netherlands, Norway and Poland were relegated due to their poor results in 2001. It was the first (and only) time Ireland and Norway were relegated from the contest. Latvia was also set to sit out this year, but when Portugal announced their non-participation, due to internal problems at its broadcaster, it left a spot open for Latvia to take, as the country had finished higher the year before than any of the other relegated countries.[a]

The winner was Latvia with the song "I Wanna", performed by Marie N who wrote it with Marats Samauskis. This was Latvia's first victory in the contest, after only 3 years of participation. Malta, United Kingdom, Estonia and France rounded out the top five. Malta achieved their best result in their Eurovision history. Further down the table, Denmark finished twenty-fourth (last place), despite being one of the favourites.

Location[edit]

Saku Suurhall, Tallinn - host venue of the 2002 contest.

Tallinn is the capital and largest city of Estonia. It is situated on the northern coast of the country, on the shore of the Gulf of Finland, 80 km (50 mi) south of Helsinki in Finland, east of Stockholm in Sweden, and west of Saint Petersburg in Russia. Founded in 1248 but the earliest human settlements date back to 3000 years BC, making it one of the oldest capital cities of Northern Europe. Due to its important strategic location the city soon became a major trade hub, especially between the 14th to 16th century when it grew to be a key centre of commerce within the Hanseatic League. Tallinn's Old Town is one of the best preserved and intact medieval cities in Europe and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.[3]

Venue[edit]

Early in the proceedings, media outlets had begun speculating whether Estonian broadcaster ETV would be able to host the contest, citing a lack of a suitable venue and budgetary concerns; however, worries were put to rest when a combination of fundraising activities and the Estonian Government enabled them to host the event.[2]

The Saku Suurhall was chosen as the venue for the contest. It is the largest indoor arena in Estonia, built in 2001 and holds up to 10,000 people. It is named after the Estonian brewery and soft drink company Saku.

Format[edit]

Slogan[edit]

For the first time, a slogan (or theme) was implemented. This year's theme was called 'A Modern Fairytale', which was evident in the postcards shown between the songs, which showed classic fairytales ending in modern Estonian situations.[4]

Postcards[edit]

The postcards continued with the opening theme of "A Modern Fairytale" taking well known fairy tales and translating them into Estonian life through short films, with a moral at the end of each one of them. The various fairy tales were as following, listed in appearance order:[5]

  1.  Cyprus – Aladdin; "Anything can happen in Estonian clubs..."
  2.  United Kingdom – The Ugly Duckling; "Young Estonians flying high"
  3.  Austria – The Three Bears; "No parking spaces... theatres everywhere"
  4.  Greece – Hansel and Gretel; "Countless Internet connections"
  5.  Spain – Frankenstein; "Tartu University - one of the oldest in Europe"
  6.  Croatia – The Three Brothers; "Nation of champions"
  7.  Russia – The Goldfish; "Freedom"
  8.  Estonia – Sleeping Beauty; "Old Town... new experiences"
  9.  Macedonia – The Missing Princess; "Fall in love with Estonian folk-dance"
  10.  Israel – Thumbelina; "Famous Estonian conductors"
  11.   Switzerland – Cinderella; "Young Estonian fashion"
  12.  Sweden  – The Magic Carpet; "Everything at the press of a button"
  13.  Finland – The Three Little Pigs; "Sauna - extreme heat from Estonia"
  14.  Denmark – The Little Mermaid; "In every port of the world you can find an Estonian sailor." (an Ernest Hemingway quotation)
  15.  Bosnia and Herzegovina – The Frog Prince; "10,000 years of untouched nature"
  16.  Belgium – Bluebeard; "Football... beer... castles"
  17.  France – The Princess Who Would Not Smile; "Estonia - it’s a small world"
  18.  Germany – Pinocchio; "Living Estonian handicraft"
  19.  Turkey – Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves; "Forests - Estonian treasure"
  20.  Malta – Beauty and the Beast; "Beaches of golden sand"
  21.  Romania – The Pied Piper; "Endless Estonian hospitality"
  22.  Slovenia – Snow White; "So many beautiful women"
  23.  Latvia – Little Red Riding Hood; "Homemade bread... for meateaters"
  24.  Lithuania – Puss in Boots; "Whites nights... shooting stars"

Participating countries[edit]

A total of 24 countries competed in the 2002 contest, which included the top 17 countries from the previous year's contest, alongside the seven returning countries which had been relegated from competing in the 2001 contest. These countries replaced the bottom 6 countries from the 2001 contest, which were relegated from taking part in this year's contest.

The total participants had originally been 22, but when the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) increased their participation number for the contest to 24 this granted Israel and Portugal the opportunity to enter. Portugal declined to enter the contest due to internal problems in the Portuguese broadcaster RTP. This allowed Latvia (who went on to win the contest) to enter.[2][6]

Draw for the running order took place on 9 November 2001.[7]

Returning artists[edit]

Lead artists
Artist Country Previous year(s)
Constantinos Christoforou (member of One)  Cyprus 1996
Philippos Constantinos (member of One) 1995 (as backing singer for Alexandros Panayi)
Monica Anghel  Romania 1996 (qualifying round)
Sahlene  Estonia 1999 (for  Sweden, as backing singer for Charlotte Nilsson) and 2000 (for  Malta, as backing singer for Claudette Pace)
Backing performers[8]
Artist Country Previous year(s)
Christina Argyri  Cyprus 2000 (as member of Voice)
Kenny Lübcke  Denmark 1992 (with Lotte Nilsson)

Results[edit]

Draw Country Artist Song Language[9] Place[10] Points
01  Cyprus One "Gimme" English 6 85
02  United Kingdom Jessica Garlick "Come Back" English 3 111
03  Austria Manuel Ortega "Say a Word" English 18 26
04  Greece Michalis Rakintzis "S.A.G.A.P.O." English[b] 17 27
05  Spain Rosa "Europe's Living a Celebration" Spanish[c] 7 81
06  Croatia Vesna Pisarović "Everything I Want" English 11 44
07  Russia Prime Minister "Northern Girl" English 10 55
08  Estonia Sahlene "Runaway" English 3 111
09  Macedonia Karolina "Od nas zavisi" (Од нас зависи) Macedonian 19 25
10  Israel Sarit Hadad "Light a Candle" Hebrew, English 12 37
11   Switzerland Francine Jordi "Dans le jardin de mon âme" French 22 15
12  Sweden Afro-dite "Never Let It Go" English 8 72
13  Finland Laura "Addicted to You" English 20 24
14  Denmark Malene Mortensen "Tell Me Who You Are" English 24 7
15  Bosnia and Herzegovina Maja "Na jastuku za dvoje" (На јастуку за двоје) Serbian, English 13 33
16  Belgium Sergio & The Ladies "Sister" English 13 33
17  France Sandrine François "Il faut du temps" French 5 104
18  Germany Corinna May "I Can't Live Without Music" English 21 17
19  Turkey Buket Bengisu and Group Safir "Leylaklar Soldu Kalbinde" Turkish, English 16 29
20  Malta Ira Losco "7th Wonder" English 2 164
21  Romania Monica Anghel and Marcel Pavel "Tell Me Why" English 9 71
22  Slovenia Sestre "Samo ljubezen" Slovene 13 33
23  Latvia Marie N "I Wanna" English 1 176
24  Lithuania Aivaras "Happy You" English 23 12

Scoreboard[edit]

Half of the participating countries organized a televote where the top 10 songs received the points, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 and 12, but Macedonia, Romania, Russia, Turkey and Bosnia and Herzegovina used juries, while Cyprus, Greece, Spain, Croatia, Finland, Malta, Slovenia and Lithuania used a 50-50 mix of both televoting and jury votes.

In the EBU's rules for the 2002 contest, it was stated; In the televoting, households shall not be permitted to vote more than three times.[7] This was used as it had become apparent that the public vote favoured songs in the later part of the running order in comparison to the songs nearer to the start - particularly in the preceding 2001 contest. At this contest (and the following one) the broadcaster decided to reverse the song recaps - starting instead with the last performed song (24) and finishing with the first performed song (1).

Voting results[11][12]
Voting procedure used:
  100% televoting
  100% jury vote
  50% jury and televote
Total score
Cyprus
United Kingdom
Austria
Greece
Spain
Croatia
Russia
Estonia
Macedonia
Israel
Switzerland
Sweden
Finland
Denmark
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Belgium
France
Germany
Turkey
Malta
Romania
Slovenia
Latvia
Lithuania
Contestants
Cyprus 85 3 12 6 10 6 4 1 4 3 12 8 4 8 4
United Kingdom 111 12 7 6 4 5 6 2 8 6 7 6 1 8 2 10 8 5 8
Austria 26 1 1 7 5 12
Greece 27 12 1 8 6
Spain 81 7 2 4 6 6 12 7 6 12 12 7
Croatia 44 6 6 5 5 5 2 3 12
Russia 55 5 2 10 1 3 8 10 10 6
Estonia 111 7 3 5 3 6 2 12 10 8 10 4 4 8 2 2 6 12 7
Macedonia 25 3 4 1 5 12
Israel 37 5 1 5 1 2 10 5 5 3
Switzerland 15 5 3 2 3 1 1
Sweden 72 1 4 1 8 3 7 10 12 1 4 7 4 10
Finland 24 2 5 1 10 3 3
Denmark 7 4 1 1 1
Bosnia and Herzegovina 33 7 3 7 3 6 2 3 2
Belgium 33 4 1 7 3 4 2 10 2
France 104 10 3 8 3 7 10 8 12 5 8 10 6 4 3 2 5
Germany 17 1 2 2 1 3 3 4 1
Turkey 29 4 3 8 7 7
Malta 164 10 12 8 6 10 12 5 7 10 10 4 4 2 12 4 7 6 10 5 10 7 3
Romania 71 8 8 5 12 12 8 4 1 7 6
Slovenia 33 6 2 7 8 2 2 1 5
Latvia 176 4 8 10 10 12 2 10 12 7 12 8 5 6 7 5 8 8 12 6 7 5 12
Lithuania 12 4 2 6

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
5  Latvia  Estonia,  Germany,  Israel,  Lithuania,  Spain
3  Malta  Croatia,  Denmark,  United Kingdom
 Spain  Belgium,  France,   Switzerland
2  Cyprus  Greece,  Malta
 Estonia  Latvia,  Sweden
 Romania  Macedonia,  Russia
1  Austria  Turkey
 Croatia  Slovenia
 France  Finland
 Macedonia  Romania
 Greece  Cyprus
 Sweden  Bosnia and Herzegovina
 United Kingdom  Austria

Spokespersons[edit]

  1.  Cyprus – Melani Steliou[13]
  2.  United Kingdom – Colin Berry
  3.  Austria – Dodo Roscic [de]
  4.  Greece – Alexis Kostalas[14]
  5.  Spain – Anne Igartiburu
  6.  Croatia – Duško Ćurlić[15]
  7.  Russia – Arina Sharapova
  8.  Estonia – Ilomai Küttim "Elektra"
  9.  Macedonia – Biljana Debarlieva[16]
  10.  Israel – Michal Zo'aretz [he]
  11.   Switzerland – Diana Jörg
  12.  Sweden – Kristin Kaspersen[17]
  13.  Finland – Marion Rung (Finnish representative in 1962 and 1973)[18]
  14.  Denmark – Signe Svendsen[19] (Danish representative in 2001 as member of Rollo & King)
  15.  Bosnia and Herzegovina – Segmedina Srna
  16.  Belgium – Geena Lisa Peeters [nl]
  17.  France – Marie Myriam (Winner of the 1977 contest)[20]
  18.  Germany – Axel Bulthaupt
  19.  Turkey – Meltem Ersan Yazgan
  20.  Malta – Yvette Portelli[21]
  21.  Romania – Leonard Miron
  22.  Slovenia – Nuša Derenda (Slovenian representative in 2001)
  23.  Latvia – Ēriks Niedra [lv]
  24.  Lithuania – Loreta Tarozaitė

Broadcasts[edit]

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF 1 Andi Knoll
FM4 Stermann & Grissemann [22]
 Belgium VRT TV1 Dutch: André Vermeulen and Bart Peeters [23]
RTBF La Une French: Jean-Pierre Hautier [24]
VRT Radio 2 Dutch: Julien Put [nl] and Michel Follet
RTBF La Première French: Laurent Daube and Éric Russon
 Bosnia and Herzegovina BHTV1 Ismeta Dervoz-Krvavac [bs]
 Croatia HRT 1 Oliver Mlakar
HR2 Draginja Balaš
 Cyprus RIK 1 Evi Papamichail [13]
RIK Deftero Pavlos Pavlou
 Denmark DR1 Keld Heick [19]
 Estonia ETV Marko Reikop [25]
Raadio 2 Vello Rand
 Finland YLE TV2 Maria Guzenina and Asko Murtomäki [fi] [26]
YLE Radio Suomi Iris Mattila and Tarja Närhi [fi]
 France France 3 Marc-Olivier Fogiel and Dave [24]
France Bleu Sébastien Cauet
 Germany Das Erste Peter Urban [27]
Deutschlandfunk/NDR 2 Thomas Mohr [28]
 Greece ET1 Dafni Bokota [29]
ERA 1 Giorgos Mitropoulos
 Israel Channel 1 No commentator
Reshet Gimel Daniel Pe'er
 Latvia LTV1 Kārlis Streips [lv]
 Lithuania LRT Darius Užkuraitis
 Macedonia MTV 1 Milanka Rašić
 Malta TVM John Bundy
 Romania TVR1 Andreea Demirgian
 Russia ORT 1 Yuriy Aksyuta [ru] and Yelena Batinova [ru]
Voice of Russia Vadim Dolgachev
 Slovenia SLO1 Andrea F
 Spain La Primera José Luis Uribarri [30]
Radio 1 Nieves Herrero
 Sweden SVT1 Claes Åkeson [sv] and Christer Björkman [17]
SR P3 Carolina Norén and Björn Kjellman [31]
  Switzerland SF 2 German: Sandra Studer
TSR 1 French: Phil Mundwiller
TSI 1 Italian: Jonathan Tedesco and Claudio Lazzarino
 Turkey TRT 1 Bülend Özveren
TRT Radyo 3 Ümit Tunçağ
 United Kingdom BBC One Terry Wogan [32][33]
BBC Choice Jenny Eclair
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Australia SBS TV Terry Wogan
 Iceland Sjónvarpið Logi Bergmann Eiðsson [34]
Rás 2 TBC [35]
 Ireland RTÉ Two Marty Whelan [36]
 Netherlands Nederland 2 Willem van Beusekom [37]
Radio 3FM Hijlco Span
 Norway NRK1 Jostein Pedersen [38]
 Poland TVP1 Artur Orzech [39]
 Portugal RTP1 Eládio Clímaco [40]
 Ukraine First National[d] Pavlo Shylko and Mariya Orlova [41]
Yugoslavia RTS2 Mladen Popović [42]

Incidents[edit]

Commentator remarks[edit]

Controversy erupted during the competition over remarks by commentators on Swedish and Belgian TV, both of whom told the audience not to vote for the Israeli entry "Light a candle" by Sarit Hadad. The song received zero points from the Swedish audience but earned two from the Belgians, finishing 12th overall.[43]

Allegation of vote swapping[edit]

This year saw allegations that the juries in certain countries were guilty of swapping votes among other. According to the Norwegian newspaper Dagbladet, The French Head of Delegation allegedly said that members of the Cypriot delegation had approached him to swap votes. In addition to Cyprus, allegations were also made toward Greece, Russia, Macedonia, Malta and Romania.[44]

Other awards[edit]

Marcel Bezençon Awards[edit]

Laura Voutilainen, Winner of Fan Award

For the first time, the Marcel Bezençon Awards were handed out to the best competing songs in the final. Named after the founder of the contest, the awards were created by Christer Björkman (Sweden's representative in the 1992 contest and the country's current Head of Delegation), and Richard Herrey (a member of the Herreys who won the 1984 contest for Sweden).[45] The awards are divided into three categories: the Artistic Award, the Fan Award, and the Press Award. The Fan Award was decided by the combined votes from members of OGAE, an international organisation consisting of a network of over 40 Eurovision Song Contest fan clubs across Europe and beyond.[46]

Category Country Song Performer(s) Final result Points
Artistic Award  Sweden "Never Let It Go" Afro-dite 8th 72
Fan Award  Finland "Addicted to You" Laura Voutilainen 20th 24
Press Award  France "Il faut du temps" Sandrine François 5th 104

Official album[edit]

Eurovision Song Contest: Tallinn 2002
ESC 2002 album cover.jpg
Compilation album by
Released18 May 2002
GenrePop
Length73:07
LabelAriola
Eurovision Song Contest chronology
Eurovision Song Contest: Copenhagen 2001
(2001)
Eurovision Song Contest: Tallinn 2002
(2002)
Eurovision Song Contest: Riga 2003
(2003)
Alternative cover
An alternative cover showing the title as Eurovision Song Contest: Estonia 2002.
An alternative cover showing the title as Eurovision Song Contest: Estonia 2002.

Eurovision Song Contest: Tallinn 2002 (also known as Eurovision Song Contest: Estonia 2002) was the official compilation album of the 2002 Contest, put together by the European Broadcasting Union and released by Ariola Records on 18 May 2002. The album featured all 24 songs that entered in the 2002 contest.[47]

Charts[edit]

Chart (2002) Peak
position
German Compilation Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[48] 6

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although Latvia and the Netherlands tied for the next highest place, per the rules for entry into the 2002 contest the spot was awarded to Latvia as they had received more top scores than the Netherlands.
  2. ^ Contains some words in Greek
  3. ^ Contains some words in English
  4. ^ Ukraine's NTU broadcast the contest on a 20-hour-delay.

References[edit]

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  3. ^ "Historic Centre (Old Town) of Tallinn". UNESCO World Heritage Centre. 7 December 1997. Retrieved 29 September 2013.
  4. ^ Bakker, Sietse (2002-05-23). "Postcards about fairytales compared with Estonia". ESCToday. Retrieved 2002-05-23.
  5. ^ "Eurovision 2002 : The Postcards". San Marino Deacon. Retrieved 8 July 2015.
  6. ^ Bakker, Sietse (2002-11-29). "EBU confirmed: Portugal resigns, Latvia is in". ESCToday. Retrieved 2009-02-28.
  7. ^ a b "Rules of Eurovision Song Contest 2002" (PDF). Myledbury. Retrieved 9 November 2014.
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  13. ^ a b Savvidis, Christos (OGAE Cyprus)
  14. ^ "Εκφωνητές της ΕΡΤ για τις ψήφους της Ελλάδας στην EUROVISION - Page 3". Retromaniax.gr. Archived from the original on 2012-09-11. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
  15. ^ "• Pogledaj temu - SPOKESPERSONS". Forum.hrt.hr. 2008-02-29. Archived from the original on 2012-03-14. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
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  25. ^ [1] Archived September 2, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
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  27. ^ "Dr. Peter Urban kommentiert - Düsseldorf 2011". Duesseldorf2011.de. Archived from the original on 2012-03-24. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
  28. ^ "Thomas Mohr: Mit Dschinghis Khan im Garten". Eurovision.de. 2011-05-14. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
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  30. ^ "FORO FESTIVAL DE EUROVISIÓN • Ver Tema - Uribarri comentarista Eurovision 2010". Eurosongcontest.phpbb3.es. Archived from the original on 2012-03-17. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
  31. ^ "Swedes stay at home with Eurovision fever". The Local. 2009-05-16. Archived from the original on 2013-05-15. Retrieved 2012-09-29.
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  38. ^ "Alt du trenger å vite om MGP - Melodi Grand Prix - Melodi Grand Prix - NRK". Nrk.no. 2003-05-27. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
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