Eurovision Song Contest 2016

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Eurovision Song Contest 2016
Come Together
Dates
Semi-final 110 May 2016 (2016-05-10)
Semi-final 212 May 2016 (2016-05-12)
Final14 May 2016 (2016-05-14)
Host
VenueGlobe Arena
Stockholm, Sweden
Presenter(s)
Directed by
Executive supervisorJon Ola Sand
Executive producer
Host broadcasterSveriges Television (SVT)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/stockholm-2016 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries42
Number of finalists26
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries
Non-returning countries
  • A coloured map of the countries of EuropePortugal in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016San Marino in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016France in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Latvia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Lithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestAustria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Hungary in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Montenegro in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Serbia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Albania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Macedonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Bulgaria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Romania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Moldova in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Ukraine in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Georgia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Azerbaijan in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Turkey in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Armenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Australia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Belarus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestLiechtenstein in the Eurovision Song ContestAndorra in the Eurovision Song ContestMonaco in the Eurovision Song ContestPoland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Czech Republic in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestLebanon in the Eurovision Song ContestTunisia in the Eurovision Song Contest
         Finalist countries     Countries eliminated in the semi-finals     Countries that participated in the past but not in 2016
Vote
Voting systemEach country awards two sets of 12, 10, 8–1 points to ten songs.
Winning song
2015 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2017

The Eurovision Song Contest 2016 was the 61st edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Stockholm, Sweden, following the country's victory at the 2015 contest with the song "Heroes" by Måns Zelmerlöw. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Sveriges Television (SVT), the contest was held at the Globe Arena and consisted of two semi-finals on 10 and 12 May, and a final on 14 May 2016. The three live shows were presented by Petra Mede and the previous year's winner Måns Zelmerlöw.

Forty-two countries participated in the contest. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia and Ukraine returned after absences from recent contests, while Australia also returned after debuting as a special guest in 2015. Portugal did not enter, largely due to their national broadcaster's insufficient promotion of its music-based media, while Romania had planned to participate, but was disqualified due to repeated non-payment of debts by its national broadcaster to the EBU.

The winner was Ukraine with the song "1944", performed and written by Jamala. Australia, Russia, Bulgaria and host country Sweden rounded out the top five. This was the first time since the introduction of professional jury voting in 2009 that the overall winner won neither the jury vote, which was won by Australia, nor the televote, which was won by Russia, with Ukraine placing second in both. "1944" is the first song containing lyrics in Crimean Tatar to win the contest.

The Czech Republic managed to qualify for the final for the first time in five attempts since its debut in 2007, while both Bosnia and Herzegovina and Greece failed to qualify from the semi-finals for the first time ever, the latter being absent from the final for the first time since 2000. In the final, Australia's second-place finish was an improvement on its fifth-place finish in 2015, while Bulgaria finished fourth, its best result since its debut and first participation in a final since 2007.

The contest was the first to implement a voting system change since 1975: each country's professional jury points were announced largely as before, while the results of each national televote were combined and announced in reverse order. It was also the first contest to be broadcast on live television in the United States, and the EBU recorded a record-breaking 204 million viewers worldwide for the contest, beating the 2015 viewing figures by over 5 million.

Location[edit]

Globe Arena, Stockholm - host venue of the 2016 contest

Venue[edit]

The contest took place in the Globe Arena in Stockholm, following Sweden's victory at the 2015 contest. The Globe Arena has a capacity of approximately 16,000 attendees, and this was the second time the contest has been staged at the venue, after the Eurovision Song Contest 2000.[1]

Bidding phase[edit]

Locations of the candidate cities: the chosen host city is marked in blue, while the eliminated cities are marked in red.

Host broadcaster Sveriges Television (SVT) announced on 24 May, the day after winning the 2015 contest, that the Tele2 Arena in Stockholm was their first choice venue. However, other cities and arenas were invited to apply, and those making a bid had approximately three weeks to submit their offer to SVT.

SVT announced on 1 June the conditions under which cities and venues could announce their interest in hosting the contest:[2]

  • SVT had to have access to the venue at least 4–6 weeks before the contest to build the stage and rig up lighting and technology.
  • A press centre with a specific size had to be made available at the venue.
  • A specific number of hotels and hotel rooms had to be made available in the vicinity of the venue.
  • The host city had to be near a major airport.

An announcement regarding the venue was expected from SVT by midsummer,[3][4] with the Ericsson Globe announced as the venue on 8 July.[5]

Key  †  Host venue

City[2] Venue Notes
Gothenburg Scandinavium Venue of the Eurovision Song Contest 1985
Ullevi Proposal was dependent on the construction of a roof to cover the stadium. The idea was rejected due to costs.[6]
Linköping Saab Arena
Malmö[7] Malmö Arena Venue of the Eurovision Song Contest 2013. Withdrew its bid on 11 June 2015, citing unavailability during the rehearsal weeks of the contest.[7]
Örnsköldsvik[8] Fjällräven Center
Sandviken and Gävle[9] Göransson Arena If this option were chosen, Sandviken would have hosted the three live shows in the Göransson Arena, while Gävle would have hosted satellite events such as smaller concerts and shows.[10]
Stockholm[11]
Annexet
Globe Arena Host venue of the Eurovision Song Contest 2000 and the final of Melodifestivalen in 1989 and between 2002 and 2012 inclusive.
Friends Arena Venue of the final of Melodifestivalen since 2013. Friends Arena is the biggest football stadium and indoor venue in Sweden and the Nordic countries. However, it was reportedly not part of Stockholm's bid.[11][12]
Hovet
Tele2 Arena SVT announced on 24 May 2015 that Tele2 Arena was their first choice venue for the contest.[3][13] However, it was not possible to use the venue due to the 4–6 week organisation requirement, which would impact on the pre-scheduled home games of Hammarby Fotboll.[12]

Other sites[edit]

The Eurovision Village was the official Eurovision Song Contest fan and sponsors' area during the events week. There it was possible to watch performances by local artists, as well as the live shows broadcast from the main venue. Located at Kungsträdgården in Stockholm, it was open from 6 to 13 May 2016.[13]

The EuroClub was the venue for the official after-parties and private performances by contest participants. Unlike the Eurovision Village, access to the EuroClub was restricted to accredited fans, delegates, and press. It was located in a temporary building on the quay next to the water in front of the Royal Palace of Stockholm.[14]

The EBU announced on 14 March 2016 that the Tele2 Arena in Stockholm would host a live event running alongside the final of the contest on 14 May.[15] Eurovision the Party, hosted by Sanna Nielsen, allowed fans to watch the final on a big screen and featured backstage material from the Globe Arena such as Nielsen conducting exclusive interviews and appearing with hosts Petra Mede and Måns Zelmerlöw. The results of the Swedish jury vote was also announced live from the event by Gina Dirawi. A pre-party and after-party was also held and featured performances from former contest winners Carola and Loreen as well as Danny Saucedo, Panetoz and DJ Tim Henri.[16][17] Executive producer Johan Bernhagen has stated that the event complements existing events being held at the Eurovision Village and the EuroClub, and it is hoped that Eurovision the Party would become an annual event in the host city of the contest.[15]

Participating countries[edit]

Eurovision Song Contest 2016 – Participation summaries by country

Eligibility for potential participation in the Eurovision Song Contest requires a national broadcaster with active EBU membership capable of receiving the contest via the Eurovision network and broadcasting it live nationwide.[18] The EBU issued an invitation to participate in the contest to all active members and associate member Australia.[19]

Participating countries had until 15 September 2015 to submit their applications for participation in the contest, and until 10 October to withdraw their applications without facing financial sanctions.[14] It had been initially announced on 26 November 2015 that 43 countries would participate in the contest, equalling the record number of participants set in 2008 and 2011.[19] However, Romania was disqualified from participation on 22 April 2016, subsequently reducing the number of participating countries to 42.[20]

Four countries returned after absences from recent contests: Bosnia and Herzegovina since 2012, Bulgaria and Croatia since 2013 and Ukraine since 2014. Australia also returned after debuting as a special guest in 2015, but by invitation of the EBU due to the associate membership status of the Special Broadcasting Service. However, instead of pre-qualifying for the final and voting in all three live shows, as was the case in 2015, Australia entered the second semi-final and voted only in that semi-final and the final. Portugal did not enter, largely due to its national broadcaster's insufficient promotion of their music-based media, as well as a poorly structured selection process,[21] while Romania was disqualified on 22 April 2016 due to repeated non-payment of debts by their national broadcaster to the EBU.[20]

Participants of the Eurovision Song Contest 2016[22]
Country Broadcaster Artist Song Language Songwriter(s)
 Albania RTSH Eneda Tarifa "Fairytale" English Olsa Toqi
 Armenia AMPTV Iveta Mukuchyan "LoveWave" English
 Australia SBS Dami Im "Sound of Silence" English
 Austria ORF Zoë "Loin d'ici" French
 Azerbaijan İTV Samra "Miracle" English
 Belarus BTRC Ivan "Help You Fly" English
 Belgium VRT Laura Tesoro "What's the Pressure" English
 Bosnia and Herzegovina BHRT Dalal and Deen feat. Ana Rucner and Jala "Ljubav je" Bosnian
 Bulgaria BNT Poli Genova "If Love Was a Crime" English
 Croatia HRT Nina Kraljić "Lighthouse" English
  • Andreas Grass
  • Nikola Paryla
 Cyprus CyBC Minus One "Alter Ego" English
 Czech Republic ČT Gabriela Gunčíková "I Stand" English
  • Sara Biglert
  • Aidan O'Connor
  • Christian Schneider
 Denmark DR Lighthouse X "Soldiers of Love" English
  • Søren Bregendal
  • Daniel Durn
  • Katrine Klith Andersen
  • Johannes Nymark
  • Sebastian Owens
  • Martin Skriver
 Estonia ERR Jüri Pootsmann "Play" English
 Finland Yle Sandhja "Sing It Away" English
 France France Télévisions Amir "J'ai cherché" French, English
 Georgia GPB Nika Kocharov and Young Georgian Lolitaz "Midnight Gold" English
  • Thomas G:son
  • Kote Kalandadze
 Germany NDR[a] Jamie-Lee "Ghost" English
  • Thomas Burchia
  • Conrad Hensel
  • Anna Leyne
 Greece ERT Argo "Utopian Land" English, Greek Vladimiros Sofianides
 Hungary MTVA Freddie "Pioneer" English
  • Borbála Csarnai
  • Zé Szabó
 Iceland RÚV Greta Salóme "Hear Them Calling" English Greta Salóme Stefánsdóttir
 Ireland RTÉ Nicky Byrne "Sunlight" English
 Israel IBA Hovi Star "Made of Stars" English Doron Medalie
 Italy RAI Francesca Michielin "No Degree of Separation" Italian, English
 Latvia LTV Justs "Heartbeat" English Aminata Savadogo
 Lithuania LRT Donny Montell "I've Been Waiting for This Night" English
  • Beatrice Robertsson
  • Jonas Thander
 North Macedonia MRT Kaliopi "Dona" (Дона) Macedonian
 Malta PBS Ira Losco "Walk on Water" English
 Moldova TRM Lidia Isac "Falling Stars" English
  • Gabriel Alares
  • Ellen Berg
  • Leonid Gutkin
  • Sebastian Lestapier
 Montenegro RTCG Highway "The Real Thing" English
  • Maro Market
  • Srđan Sekulović "Skansi"
  • Luka Vojvodić
 Netherlands AVROTROS Douwe Bob "Slow Down" English
 Norway NRK Agnete "Icebreaker" English
 Poland TVP Michał Szpak "Color of Your Life" English
  • Andy Palmer
  • Kamil Varen
 Russia RTR Sergey Lazarev "You Are the Only One" English
 San Marino SMRTV Serhat "I Didn't Know" English
  • Olcayto Ahmet Tuğsuz
  • Nektarios Tyrakis
 Serbia RTS Sanja Vučić Zaa "Goodbye (Shelter)" English Ivana Peters
 Slovenia RTVSLO ManuElla "Blue and Red" English
 Spain RTVE Barei "Say Yay!" English
  • Barei
  • Víctor Púa
  • Rubén Villanueva
 Sweden SVT Frans "If I Were Sorry" English
  Switzerland SRG SSR Rykka "The Last of Our Kind" English
 Ukraine UA:PBC Jamala "1944" English, Crimean Tatar Jamala
 United Kingdom BBC Joe and Jake "You're Not Alone" English

Returning artists[edit]

Seven artists returned after having previously participated in the contest. Deen returned after previously representing Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2004, finishing ninth in the final with the song "In the Disco".[8] Kaliopi returned after previously representing Macedonia in 2012, finishing 13th in the final with the song "Crno i belo". She was also selected to represent Macedonia in 1996 with "Samo ti", but was eliminated in a non-televised pre-qualifying round.[24] Poli Genova returned after previously representing Bulgaria in 2011, finishing 12th in the second semi-final with the song "Na inat".[25] Ira Losco returned after previously representing Malta in 2002, finishing in second place with the song "7th Wonder".[9] Donny Montell returned after previously representing Lithuania in 2012, finishing 14th in the final with the song "Love Is Blind".[26] Greta Salóme returned after previously representing Iceland in 2012 with Jónsi, finishing 20th in the final with the song "Never Forget".[27] Bojan Jovović returned for Montenegro as part of Highway after previously representing Serbia and Montenegro in 2005 as part of No Name, finishing seventh in the final with the song "Zauvijek moja".[10]

Armenian backing vocalist Monica previously represented Armenia in Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2008. Sahlene, who represented Estonia in 2002, returned as a backing vocalist for Australia. Martina Majerle, who represented Slovenia in 2009 and provided backing vocals numerous times for Croatia 2003, Montenegro 2008, 2014 and Slovenia 2007, 2011, 2012, returned as a backing vocalist for Croatia.

Other countries[edit]

Active EBU members[edit]

  •  PortugalRádio e Televisão de Portugal (RTP) had encouraged viewers to suggest changes to their selection process, assuming they had chosen to participate in the contest. Portugal had failed to qualify for the final since 2010, which the majority of the Portuguese public believed to be due to RTP's selection format, Festival da Canção.[21] Kátia Aveiro, sister of Cristiano Ronaldo, had launched a campaign on Twitter asking fans to back her bid to represent Portugal.[28] However, RTP announced on 7 October 2015 that Portugal would not participate in the 2016 contest, adding that they were looking forward to participating in the 2017 contest with a restructured selection process.[29] RTP's ombudsman, Jaime Fernandes, stated on 7 November during the television show A Voz do Cidadão that the decision was due not only to poor results in previous contests, but also RTP's insufficient promotion of music-related content.[30]
  •  Romania – Romania had originally confirmed their participation in the contest with the song "Moment of Silence", performed by Ovidiu Anton. However, the EBU announced on 22 April 2016 that Televiziunea Română (TVR) had repeatedly failed to pay debts totalling CHF 16 million (14.56 million) by 20 April, the deadline set by the EBU. TVR's failure to repay their debts resulted in their expulsion from the EBU, and consequently Romania's disqualification from the contest.[31] This led to strong reactions against the decision.[32]

Active EBU member broadcasters in Andorra, Luxembourg, Monaco, Slovakia (despite the country's return to the Eurovision Young Dancers in 2015) and Turkey confirmed non-participation prior to the announcement of the participants list by the EBU.[33][34][35][36][37][38][39] Lebanese broadcaster TL had not ruled out debuting in 2016,[40] but it ultimately did not appear on the final list of participating countries.

Associate EBU members[edit]

The EBU announced on 18 December 2015 that Kazakh broadcaster Khabar Agency would become an associate EBU member on 1 January 2016. However, Kazakhstan would be unable to debut at the contest as eligibility for participation requires a national broadcaster with active EBU membership.[41]

Non-EBU members[edit]

Despite the EBU's positive response to Chinese broadcaster Hunan Television's interest in participating,[42] in June 2015 the union denied that China would debut at the contest.[43] That same month, it was reported that Faroese broadcaster KVF had applied for active EBU membership in order to take part in the contest; the application was rejected due to the islands' membership of the Danish Realm.[44][45] Despite Kosovo not being recognised by 15 states in Europe and its broadcaster RTK having neither active nor associate EBU membership, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Petrit Selimi tweeted that the country would debut at the 2016 contest, without further elaboration;[46] this was promptly denied by the EBU.[43] Liechtensteiner broadcaster 1 FL TV was also unable to debut at the contest due to insufficient funding for EBU membership.[47]

Format[edit]

The preliminary dates for the contest were announced on 16 March 2015 at a Heads of Delegation meeting in Vienna, with the semi-finals taking place on 10 and 12 May, and the final on 14 May 2016.[48] These were subject to change depending on SVT,[49] but were later confirmed when Stockholm was announced as the host city.[5]

Discussions were held in 2014 between the EBU and the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union (ABU) regarding the inclusion of a guest performance from the ABU TV Song Festival at the contest. The EBU confirmed on 16 July 2015 that they would be looking into the possibility of the proposal, which was discussed at the ABU General Assembly in 2014.[50]

SVT proposed a change of start time of the contest from 21:00 CEST to 20:00 CEST on 9 September, arguing that such a change would help to promote family viewing of the contest, especially in eastern Europe when it would run late into the night.[51] However, the EBU published the public rules of the contest on 28 October, which stated that the start time would remain at 21:00 CEST.[52]

The EBU announced on 23 September that rather than using clips from their respective music videos, extended clips from the dress rehearsals of the six acts who qualified directly to the final (the "Big Five" and host nation Sweden) would be shown as previews during the semi-final in which they were allocated to vote.[53]

The core team for the contest was announced by SVT and the EBU on 26 October. Johan Bernhagen and Martin Österdahl were executive producers, while Tobias Åberg was head of production. The three live shows were directed by Sven Stojanović and the contest was produced by Christer Björkman.[54]

New voting system[edit]

The EBU announced on 18 February 2016 that a new voting system would be implemented at the contest for the first time since 1975. The new system, inspired by the voting system of Melodifestivalen, involved each country awarding two sets of points from 1–8, 10 and 12: one from their professional jury and the other from televoting. Televoting votes from all the countries would be pooled. After viewers cast their votes, the results of each professional jury would be presented, with countries receiving 1–8 and 10 points being displayed on-screen, instead of 1–7 as had been the case since 2006, and the national spokesperson announcing only the country to which they award 12 points. After the results of the professional juries were presented, the televoting points from all participating countries would be combined, providing one score for each song. The new voting system would also be used to determine the qualifiers from each semi-final, but, as before, the qualifiers are announced in a random order.[55][56]

As the new voting system would give equal weight to jury and televoting results, a national jury result could not be used as a backup result for the televoting or vice versa. Therefore, if a country could not deliver a valid televoting/jury result, a substitute result would be calculated by the jury/televoting result of a pre-selected group of countries approved by the contest's Reference Group. The Director General of Radiotelevisione della Repubblica di San Marino (SMRTV), Carlo Romeo, stated on 23 February that the use of a substitute televoting result discriminated against microstates like San Marino, which only used a professional jury due to their use of the Italian phone system and would therefore have its voting representation diminished under the new system, and criticised the EBU for not contacting its members before making the decision.[57][58]

Presenters[edit]

Måns Zelmerlöv standing next to Petra Mede at a press conference at the Eurovision Song Contest 2016
Måns Zelmerlöw and Petra Mede, hosts of the 2016 contest.

After his victory in the 2015 contest, Måns Zelmerlöw announced his interest in hosting the 2016 contest.[59] His experience as a television presenter includes Melodifestivalen 2010[60] and SVT sing-along show Allsång på Skansen.[61] Christer Björkman told Expressen on 25 May that Gina Dirawi, Petra Mede and Sanna Nielsen were also being considered as hosts,[62] but it was reported on 1 June that SVT was considering Zelmerlöw and Dolph Lundgren as co-hosts.[63] Expressen reported on 19 August that Mede and Zelmerlöw were SVT's first choice of hosts,[64] while it was announced at a press conference on 14 December that they would indeed co-host.[65]

The press conferences were presented by Jovan Radomir and Catarina Rolfsdotter-Jansson, who also provided commentary from the red carpet event in front of the Stockholm Palace, before the official welcome party at Stockholm City Hall on 8 May 2016.[66][67]

Semi-final allocation draw[edit]

Results of the semi-final allocation draw
  Participating countries in the first semi-final
  Pre-qualified for the final but also voting in the first semi-final
  Participating countries in the second semi-final[b]
  Pre-qualified for the final but also voting in the second semi-final

The draw to determine the allocation of the participating countries into their respective semi-finals took place at Stockholm City Hall on 25 January 2016, hosted by Alexandra Pascalidou and Jovan Radomir.[68] The first part of the draw determined in which semi-final the "Big Five" and host country Sweden would have to vote. The second part of the draw decided in which half of the respective semi-finals each country would perform, with the exact running order determined by the producers of the show at a later date. The EBU originally announced that the running order would be revealed on 5 April,[69] however for undisclosed reasons this was later put back to 8 April.[70] Eighteen countries participated in the first semi-final, while nineteen countries were planned to participate in the second semi-final, but this was reduced to eighteen on 22 April due to the disqualification of Romania. From each semi-final, ten countries joined the "Big Five" and Sweden in the final, where a total of twenty-six countries participated.

The thirty-seven semi-finalists were allocated into six pots, which were published by the EBU on 21 January, based on historical voting patterns as calculated by the contest's official televoting partner Digame. Drawing from different pots helps in reducing the chance of so-called neighbour voting and increasing suspense in the semi-finals. Sweden and Germany were pre-allocated to vote and perform in the first and second semi-final respectively due to requests from their respective broadcasters, which were approved by the EBU.[71][72]

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4 Pot 5 Pot 6

Opening and interval acts[edit]

Justin Timberlake performed "Rock Your Body" and "Can't Stop the Feeling!" during the interval of the final.

The EBU announced on 1 May 2016 that the opening act of the first semi-final would be a performance of "Heroes" by Måns Zelmerlöw,[73] while the opening act of the second semi-final would be a musical theatre comedy song entitled "That's Eurovision", composed by Matheson Bayley and written by Bayley, Edward af Sillén and Daniel Réhn, and performed by Zelmerlöw and Mede.[74] The opening act of the final was a parade of flags similar to final opening ceremonies since 2013, themed as a tribute to Swedish fashion design and dance music with artists being welcomed on stage in a catwalk fashion show with flags being projected onto 26 dresses designed by Bea Szenfeld.[75]

The interval acts of both semi-finals were sketches choreographed by Fredrik Rydman: "The Grey People" in the first semi-final and "Man vs Machine" in the second semi-final respectively. The EBU announced on 9 May that one of the interval acts of the final would be a world premiere live performance of "Can't Stop the Feeling!" and "Rock Your Body" by Justin Timberlake.[76] He was the first "global megastar" in the contest's 61-year-history to perform during the interval.[77] Other interval acts in the final included a sketch called "Love Love Peace Peace", a pastiche of past entries which featured appearances from Lordi and Alexander Rybak, winners of the contest in 2006 and 2009 respectively and performed by Zelmerlöw and Mede,[78] a sketch starring Lynda Woodruff, played by Sarah Dawn Finer, and a performance of "Fire in the Rain" and "Heroes" by Zelmerlöw, from his albums Chameleon and Perfectly Damaged respectively.[79]

During the live broadcast of the final on Logo TV in the United States, Timberlake's performance was replaced by a reprise of "The Grey People" from the first semi-final, while the official DVD release removed it entirely. In an interview with The Guardian, the contest's Executive Supervisor, Jon Ola Sand, revealed that this was due to rights restrictions.[80][81][82]

Contest overview[edit]

Semi-final 1[edit]

Eighteen countries participated in the first semi-final. France, Spain, and Sweden voted in this semi-final.[72][83] The highlighted countries qualified for the final.[84]

  Qualifiers
R/O[85] Country Artist Song Points Place[86]
1  Finland Sandhja "Sing It Away" 51 15
2  Greece Argo "Utopian Land" 44 16
3  Moldova Lidia Isac "Falling Stars" 33 17
4  Hungary Freddie "Pioneer" 197 4
5  Croatia Nina Kraljić "Lighthouse" 133 10
6  Netherlands Douwe Bob "Slow Down" 197 5
7  Armenia Iveta Mukuchyan "LoveWave" 243 2
8  San Marino Serhat "I Didn't Know" 68 12
9  Russia Sergey Lazarev "You Are the Only One" 342 1
10  Czech Republic Gabriela Gunčíková "I Stand" 161 9
11  Cyprus Minus One "Alter Ego" 164 8
12  Austria Zoë "Loin d'ici" 170 7
13  Estonia Jüri Pootsmann "Play" 24 18
14  Azerbaijan Samra "Miracle" 185 6
15  Montenegro Highway "The Real Thing" 60 13
16  Iceland Greta Salóme "Hear Them Calling" 51 14
17  Bosnia and Herzegovina Dalal and Deen feat. Ana Rucner and Jala "Ljubav je" 104 11
18  Malta Ira Losco "Walk on Water" 209 3

Semi-final 2[edit]

Eighteen countries participated in the second semi-final. Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom voted in this semi-final.[72][83] Romania were originally planned to perform twelfth in this semi-final, but were disqualified due to repeated non-payment of debts to the EBU, resulting in countries originally planned to perform thirteenth or later to do so one place earlier.[20] The highlighted countries qualified for the final.[87]

  Qualifiers
R/O[85] Country Artist Song Points Place[88]
1  Latvia Justs "Heartbeat" 132 8
2  Poland Michał Szpak "Color of Your Life" 151 6
3   Switzerland Rykka "The Last of Our Kind" 28 18
4  Israel Hovi Star "Made of Stars" 147 7
5  Belarus Ivan "Help You Fly" 84 12
6  Serbia Sanja Vučić Zaa "Goodbye (Shelter)" 105 10
7  Ireland Nicky Byrne "Sunlight" 46 15
8  Macedonia Kaliopi "Dona" 88 11
9  Lithuania Donny Montell "I've Been Waiting for This Night" 222 4
10  Australia Dami Im "Sound of Silence" 330 1
11  Slovenia ManuElla "Blue and Red" 57 14
12  Bulgaria Poli Genova "If Love Was a Crime" 220 5
13  Denmark Lighthouse X "Soldiers of Love" 34 17
14  Ukraine Jamala "1944" 287 2
15  Norway Agnete "Icebreaker" 63 13
16  Georgia Nika Kocharov and Young Georgian Lolitaz "Midnight Gold" 123 9
17  Albania Eneda Tarifa "Fairytale" 45 16
18  Belgium Laura Tesoro "What's the Pressure" 274 3

Final[edit]

26 countries participated in the final, with all 42 participating countries eligible to vote. The running order for the final was revealed after the second semi-final qualifiers' press conference on 13 May.[89]

  Winner
R/O Country Artist Song Points Place[90]
1  Belgium Laura Tesoro "What's the Pressure" 181 10
2  Czech Republic Gabriela Gunčíková "I Stand" 41 25
3  Netherlands Douwe Bob "Slow Down" 153 11
4  Azerbaijan Samra "Miracle" 117 17
5  Hungary Freddie "Pioneer" 108 19
6  Italy Francesca Michielin "No Degree of Separation" 124 16
7  Israel Hovi Star "Made of Stars" 135 14
8  Bulgaria Poli Genova "If Love Was a Crime" 307 4
9  Sweden Frans "If I Were Sorry" 261 5
10  Germany Jamie-Lee "Ghost" 11 26
11  France Amir "J'ai cherché" 257 6
12  Poland Michał Szpak "Color of Your Life" 229 8
13  Australia Dami Im "Sound of Silence" 511 2
14  Cyprus Minus One "Alter Ego" 96 21
15  Serbia Sanja Vučić Zaa "Goodbye (Shelter)" 115 18
16  Lithuania Donny Montell "I've Been Waiting for This Night" 200 9
17  Croatia Nina Kraljić "Lighthouse" 73 23
18  Russia Sergey Lazarev "You Are the Only One" 491 3
19  Spain Barei "Say Yay!" 77 22
20  Latvia Justs "Heartbeat" 132 15
21  Ukraine Jamala "1944" 534 1
22  Malta Ira Losco "Walk on Water" 153 12
23  Georgia Nika Kocharov and Young Georgian Lolitaz "Midnight Gold" 104 20
24  Austria Zoë "Loin d'ici" 151 13
25  United Kingdom Joe and Jake "You're Not Alone" 62 24
26  Armenia Iveta Mukuchyan "LoveWave" 249 7

Spokespersons[edit]

The spokespersons announced the 12-point score from their respective country's national jury in the following order:[91]

  1.  Austria – Kati Bellowitsch
  2.  Iceland – Unnsteinn Manúel Stefánsson
  3.  Azerbaijan – Tural Asadov
  4.  San Marino – Irol MC [it]
  5.  Czech Republic – Daniela Písařovicová [cz]
  6.  Ireland – Sinéad Kennedy
  7.  Georgia – Nina Sublatti
  8.  Bosnia and Herzegovina – Ivana Crnogorac
  9.  Malta – Ben Camille
  10.  Spain – Jota Abril [es]
  11.  Finland – Jussi-Pekka Rantanen [fi]
  12.   Switzerland – Sebalter
  13.  Denmark – Ulla Essendrop
  14.  France – Élodie Gossuin
  15.  Moldova – Olivia Furtună
  16.  Armenia – Arman Margaryan
  17.  Cyprus – Loukas Hamatsos
  18.  Bulgaria – Anna Angelova
  19.  Netherlands – Trijntje Oosterhuis
  20.  Latvia – Toms Grēviņš [lv]
  21.  Israel – Ofer Nachshon
  22.  Belarus – Uzari
  23.  Germany – Barbara Schöneberger
  24.  Russia – Nyusha
  25.  Norway – Elisabeth Andreassen
  26.  Australia – Lee Lin Chin
  27.  Belgium – Umesh Vangaver [nl]
  28.  United Kingdom – Richard Osman
  29.  Croatia – Nevena Rendeli
  30.  Greece – Constantinos Christoforou
  31.  Lithuania – Ugnė Galadauskaitė
  32.  Serbia – Dragana Kosjerina
  33.  Macedonia – Dijana Gogova
  34.  Albania – Andri Xhahu
  35.  Estonia – Daniel Levi Viinalass [et]
  36.  Ukraine – Verka Serduchka
  37.  Italy – Claudia Andreatti
  38.  Poland – Anna Popek [pl]
  39.  Slovenia – Marjetka Vovk
  40.  Hungary – Csilla Tatár
  41.  Montenegro – Danijel Alibabić
  42.  Sweden – Gina Dirawi

Detailed voting results[edit]

Semi-final 1[edit]

  Qualifiers
Split results of semi-final 1
Place Combined Jury Televoting
Country Points Country Points Country Points
1  Russia 342  Malta 155  Russia 194
2  Armenia 243  Russia 148  Austria 133
3  Malta 209  Armenia 127  Hungary 119
4  Hungary 197[d]  Czech Republic 120  Armenia 116
5  Netherlands 197[d]  Netherlands 102  Netherlands 95
6  Azerbaijan 185  Azerbaijan 92  Cyprus 93
7  Austria 170  Croatia 80  Azerbaijan 93
8  Cyprus 164  Hungary 78  Bosnia and Herzegovina 78
9  Czech Republic 161  Cyprus 71  Malta 54
10  Croatia 133  Montenegro 46  Croatia 53
11  Bosnia and Herzegovina 104  Austria 37  San Marino 49
12  San Marino 68  Finland 35  Czech Republic 41
13  Montenegro 60  Iceland 27  Iceland 24
14  Iceland 51[e]  Bosnia and Herzegovina 26  Greece 22
15  Finland 51[e]  Moldova 24  Finland 16
16  Greece 44  Greece 22  Estonia 15
17  Moldova 33  San Marino 19  Montenegro 14
18  Estonia 24  Estonia 9  Moldova 9
Detailed jury voting results of semi-final 1[92][93]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Jury vote
Finland
Greece
Moldova
Hungary
Croatia
Netherlands
Armenia
San Marino
Russia
Czech Republic
Cyprus
Austria
Estonia
Azerbaijan
Montenegro
Iceland
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Malta
France
Spain
Sweden
Contestants
Finland 51 35 16 4 2 8 7 2 5 3 4
Greece 44 22 22 3 7 3 6 3
Moldova 33 24 9 3 6 6 5 4
Hungary 197 78 119 7 3 8 3 4 12 6 5 8 1 2 4 5 10
Croatia 133 80 53 5 5 3 12 2 1 1 6 7 7 3 7 7 5 6 3
Netherlands 197 102 95 12 1 4 6 2 4 12 10 6 12 2 12 1 8 4 6
Armenia 243 127 116 7 10 10 5 5 5 12 10 5 2 12 5 7 12 3 12 5
San Marino 68 19 49 3 10 6
Russia 342 148 194 6 12 12 10 6 1 7 3 12 8 1 12 8 10 8 10 2 8 12
Czech Republic 161 120 41 10 8 8 12 4 5 4 5 5 10 6 2 4 8 12 3 1 6 7
Cyprus 164 71 93 8 7 2 10 10 8 1 10 1 8 4 1 1
Austria 170 37 133 3 2 6 5 2 4 1 12 2
Estonia 24 9 15 1 2 2 1 1 2
Azerbaijan 185 92 93 2 5 7 3 7 6 10 3 4 4 7 5 3 6 7 5 8
Montenegro 60 46 14 6 10 10 3 7 3 7
Iceland 51 27 24 4 1 1 7 4 1 3 4 2
Bosnia and Herzegovina 104 26 78 1 4 1 2 2 10 6
Malta 209 155 54 8 4 6 12 7 8 12 5 8 8 8 12 8 4 10 6 2 10 7 10
Detailed televoting results of semi-final 1[92]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Televote
Finland
Greece
Moldova
Hungary
Croatia
Netherlands
Armenia
San Marino
Russia
Czech Republic
Cyprus
Austria
Estonia
Azerbaijan
Montenegro
Iceland
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Malta
France
Spain
Sweden
Contestants
Finland 51 35 16 1 7 2 6
Greece 44 22 22 7 3 12
Moldova 33 24 9 5 2 2
Hungary 197 78 119 4 7 6 8 6 6 7 6 6 6 8 5 7 6 6 1 8 7 5 4
Croatia 133 80 53 2 4 2 5 3 4 2 1 6 8 12 1 2 1
Netherlands 197 102 95 6 2 6 5 4 6 3 4 10 8 4 10 7 4 6 10
Armenia 243 127 116 1 8 8 2 3 12 8 12 12 7 4 1 3 3 3 4 12 10 3
San Marino 68 19 49 3 6 4 5 4 5 4 10 2 1 5
Russia 342 148 194 8 10 10 10 10 8 12 12 8 10 7 12 12 10 12 7 12 8 8 8
Czech Republic 161 120 41 3 3 3 4 2 2 2 1 1 3 1 4 2 3 7
Cyprus 164 71 93 7 12 7 2 3 8 5 8 4 2 6 1 5 5 2 6 5 3 2
Austria 170 37 133 10 5 7 8 7 10 5 3 10 5 3 10 6 8 6 1 10 12 7
Estonia 24 9 15 12 1 2
Azerbaijan 185 92 93 12 12 10 7 10 8 7 7 10 10
Montenegro 60 46 14 6 8
Iceland 51 27 24 5 1 3 3 3 4 5
Bosnia and Herzegovina 104 26 78 12 7 1 4 7 12 5 12 6 12
Malta 209 155 54 1 5 4 1 1 10 2 1 5 2 8 4 4 5 1

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of the maximum 12 points awarded by each country's professional jury and televote in the first semi-final. Countries in bold gave the maximum 24 points (12 points apiece from professional jury and televoting) to the specified entrant.

12 points awarded by juries
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
5  Russia  Azerbaijan,  Cyprus,  Greece,  Moldova,  Sweden
4  Armenia  Malta,  Montenegro,  Russia,  Spain
 Netherlands  Estonia,  Finland,  Iceland,  San Marino
3  Malta  Armenia,  Austria,  Hungary
2  Czech Republic  Bosnia and Herzegovina,  Croatia
1  Austria  France
 Croatia  Netherlands
 Hungary  Czech Republic
12 points awarded by televoting
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
6  Russia  Armenia,  Azerbaijan,  Estonia,  Iceland,  Malta,  San Marino
4  Armenia  Czech Republic,  France,  Netherlands,  Russia
 Bosnia and Herzegovina  Austria,  Croatia,  Montenegro,  Sweden
2  Azerbaijan  Hungary,  Moldova
1  Austria  Spain
 Croatia  Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Cyprus  Greece
 Estonia  Finland
 Greece  Cyprus

Semi-final 2[edit]

  Qualifiers
Split results of semi-final 2
Place Combined Jury Televoting
Country Points Country Points Country Points
1  Australia 330  Australia 188  Ukraine 152
2  Ukraine 287  Belgium 139  Australia 142
3  Belgium 274  Ukraine 135  Belgium 135
4  Lithuania 222  Israel 127  Poland 131
5  Bulgaria 220  Lithuania 104  Bulgaria 122
6  Poland 151  Bulgaria 98  Lithuania 118
7  Israel 147  Georgia 84  Latvia 68
8  Latvia 132  Latvia 64  Macedonia 54
9  Georgia 123  Serbia 55  Belarus 52
10  Serbia 105  Slovenia 49  Serbia 50
11  Macedonia 88  Macedonia 34  Georgia 39
12  Belarus 84  Belarus 32  Albania 35
13  Norway 63  Norway 29  Norway 34
14  Slovenia 57   Switzerland 25  Ireland 31
15  Ireland 46  Poland 20  Denmark 24
16  Albania 45  Ireland 15  Israel 20
17  Denmark 34  Denmark 10  Slovenia 8
18   Switzerland 28  Albania 10   Switzerland 3
Detailed jury voting results of semi-final 2[94][95]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Jury vote
Latvia
Poland
Switzerland
Israel
Belarus
Serbia
Ireland
Macedonia
Lithuania
Australia
Slovenia
Bulgaria
Denmark
Ukraine
Norway
Georgia
Albania
Belgium
Germany
Italy
United Kingdom
Contestants
Latvia 132 64 68 6 6 7 4 2 7 10 3 6 2 5 1 5
Poland 151 20 131 1 3 3 1 4 3 2 3
Switzerland 28 25 3 1 5 1 7 2 7 1 1
Israel 147 127 20 2 8 10 1 7 7 6 6 10 4 5 5 7 5 6 4 10 12 8 4
Belarus 84 32 52 1 4 1 2 6 2 6 5 2 3
Serbia 105 55 50 5 1 3 5 12 3 8 3 8 2 5
Ireland 46 15 31 2 4 2 3 2 2
Macedonia 88 34 54 8 12 2 12
Lithuania 222 104 118 12 3 8 4 10 5 3 5 7 1 3 10 8 8 2 3 3 1 8
Australia 330 188 142 8 10 12 12 8 4 6 4 12 5 12 12 12 12 8 10 12 7 12 10
Slovenia 57 49 8 3 6 8 7 1 4 1 6 7 6
Bulgaria 220 98 122 7 5 4 3 4 2 10 8 2 8 6 7 10 7 6 4 5
Denmark 34 10 24 3 4 3
Ukraine 287 135 152 10 12 5 10 7 10 10 8 8 4 1 6 12 5 5 6 10 6
Norway 63 29 34 2 6 4 5 6 1 4 1
Georgia 123 84 39 6 7 5 2 3 1 1 10 7 4 1 8 10 7 12
Albania 45 10 35 8 2
Belgium 274 139 135 4 2 7 6 12 12 3 5 12 12 10 8 10 7 10 8 4 7
Detailed televoting results of semi-final 2[94]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Televote
Latvia
Poland
Switzerland
Israel
Belarus
Serbia
Ireland
Macedonia
Lithuania
Australia
Slovenia
Bulgaria
Denmark
Ukraine
Norway
Georgia
Albania
Belgium
Germany
Italy
United Kingdom
Contestants
Latvia 132 64 68 5 5 7 7 12 5 2 3 3 8 3 3 5
Poland 151 20 131 4 7 6 6 1 10 1 7 4 6 6 12 10 7 12 12 10 10
Switzerland 28 25 3 3
Israel 147 127 20 1 2 6 2 2 1 1 1 2 2
Belarus 84 32 52 7 8 3 5 1 6 4 1 10 6 1
Serbia 105 55 50 12 10 2 12 5 2 1 6
Ireland 46 15 31 1 2 2 1 1 7 4 2 4 7
Macedonia 88 34 54 4 2 12 4 10 8 12 2
Lithuania 222 104 118 10 3 5 10 12 8 3 7 6 12 10 4 8 4 4 12
Australia 330 188 142 8 10 6 12 7 7 8 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 4 6 10 10 3 6
Slovenia 57 49 8 4 3 1
Bulgaria 220 98 122 3 4 3 10 8 8 5 8 3 10 5 3 5 6 5 7 7 7 7 8
Denmark 34 10 24 2 1 1 4 3 1 5 2 5
Ukraine 287 135 152 12 12 5 7 12 6 4 6 10 3 8 12 5 4 12 5 6 8 12 3
Norway 63 29 34 3 3 2 2 2 1 10 1 10
Georgia 123 84 39 5 7 2 2 8 1 8 5 1
Albania 45 10 35 10 12 3 2 8
Belgium 274 139 135 6 6 8 8 4 10 6 5 4 12 7 10 12 4 7 3 8 6 5 4

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of the maximum 12 points awarded by each country's professional jury and televote in the second semi-final. Countries in bold gave the maximum 24 points (12 points apiece from professional jury and televoting) to the specified entrant.

12 points awarded by juries
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
9  Australia  Belgium,  Bulgaria,  Denmark,  Israel,  Italy,  Lithuania,  Norway,   Switzerland,  Ukraine
4  Belgium  Australia,  Belarus,  Ireland,  Slovenia
2  Macedonia  Albania,  Serbia
 Ukraine  Georgia,  Poland
1  Georgia  United Kingdom
 Israel  Germany
 Lithuania  Latvia
 Serbia  Macedonia
12 points awarded by televoting
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
6  Ukraine  Belarus,  Bulgaria,  Georgia,  Italy,  Latvia,  Poland
3  Poland  Belgium,  Germany,  Ukraine
 Lithuania  Ireland,  Norway,  United Kingdom
2  Belgium  Australia,  Denmark
 Macedonia  Albania,  Serbia
 Serbia  Slovenia,   Switzerland
1  Albania  Macedonia
 Australia  Israel
 Latvia  Lithuania

Final[edit]

  Winner
Split results of the final
Place Combined Jury Televoting
Country Points Country Points Country Points
1  Ukraine 534  Australia 320  Russia 361
2  Australia 511  Ukraine 211  Ukraine 323
3  Russia 491  France 148  Poland 222
4  Bulgaria 307  Malta 137  Australia 191
5  Sweden 261  Russia 130  Bulgaria 180
6  France 257  Belgium 130  Sweden 139
7  Armenia 249  Bulgaria 127  Armenia 134
8  Poland 229  Israel 124  Austria 120
9  Lithuania 200  Sweden 122  France 109
10  Belgium 181  Armenia 115  Lithuania 96
11  Netherlands 153[f]  Netherlands 114  Serbia 80
12  Malta 153[f]  Lithuania 104  Azerbaijan 73
13  Austria 151  Italy 90  Latvia 63
14  Israel 135  Georgia 80  Hungary 56
15  Latvia 132  Latvia 69  Cyprus 53
16  Italy 124  Spain 67  Belgium 51
17  Azerbaijan 117  United Kingdom 54  Netherlands 39
18  Serbia 115  Hungary 52  Italy 34
19  Hungary 108  Azerbaijan 44  Croatia 33
20  Georgia 104  Cyprus 43  Georgia 24
21  Cyprus 96  Czech Republic 41  Malta 16
22  Spain 77  Croatia 40  Israel 11
23  Croatia 73  Serbia 35  Spain 10
24  United Kingdom 62  Austria 31  Germany 10
25  Czech Republic 41  Poland 7  United Kingdom 8
26  Germany 11  Germany 1  Czech Republic 0
Detailed jury voting results of the final[96][97]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Jury vote
Austria
Iceland
Azerbaijan
San Marino
Czech Republic
Ireland
Georgia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Malta
Spain
Finland
Switzerland
Denmark
France
Moldova
Armenia
Cyprus
Bulgaria
Netherlands
Latvia
Israel
Belarus
Germany
Russia
Norway
Australia
Belgium
United Kingdom
Croatia
Greece
Lithuania
Serbia
Macedonia
Albania
Estonia
Ukraine
Italy
Poland
Slovenia
Hungary
Montenegro
Sweden
Contestants
Belgium 181 130 51 5 3 2 12 10 10 8 4 10 4 6 4 5 5 12 5 4 10 8 3
Czech Republic 41 41 0 4 5 2 6 3 1 1 10 4 2 3
Netherlands 153 114 39 12 4 7 8 3 10 5 7 7 2 3 4 6 3 4 5 2 6 4 1 6 5
Azerbaijan 117 44 73 1 2 2 1 2 10 1 1 7 7 10
Hungary 108 52 56 4 2 10 10 4 1 5 3 1 2 3 7
Italy 124 90 34 10 6 8 5 2 2 12 3 6 3 12 10 3 8
Israel 135 124 11 3 4 3 1 1 7 8 2 5 7 2 12 3 10 2 3 7 6 7 5 3 6 8 7 2
Bulgaria 307 127 180 8 10 3 10 1 6 10 7 1 7 1 8 8 6 5 2 4 10 4 1 3 10 2
Sweden 261 122 139 8 6 12 5 6 12 4 5 6 10 8 8 10 12 4 2 4
Germany 11 1 10 1
France 257 148 109 7 2 5 3 4 7 6 7 1 12 7 5 8 7 6 8 6 8 6 1 10 1 7 1 5 8
Poland 229 7 222 2 1 3 1
Australia 511 320 191 12 10 7 8 10 3 8 8 12 10 6 10 5 10 8 12 5 10 6 6 2 10 12 8 12 7 12 6 8 12 10 5 6 10 6 12 4 12
Cyprus 96 43 53 5 5 2 6 4 7 1 8 4 1
Serbia 115 35 80 8 5 2 2 7 5 6
Lithuania 200 104 96 1 5 3 5 6 7 5 4 1 10 1 10 1 2 7 4 8 5 12 2 3 2
Croatia 73 40 33 6 7 8 2 4 1 1 3 1 1 6
Russia 491 130 361 3 8 12 7 5 4 4 1 7 2 12 6 7 12 6 12 1 7 8 6
Spain 77 67 10 1 2 1 3 8 3 4 4 7 5 6 12 5 5 1
Latvia 132 69 63 1 1 7 3 5 2 3 7 3 8 8 6 7 8
Ukraine 534 211 323 10 12 12 12 6 12 12 3 12 12 7 7 4 2 3 10 2 8 12 12 7 10 12 12
Malta 153 137 16 10 4 6 3 6 6 5 4 3 8 6 7 4 5 8 4 10 2 2 5 10 12 7
Georgia 104 80 24 6 10 3 8 5 7 12 5 10 3 3 8
Austria 151 31 120 1 1 4 4 8 8 5
United Kingdom 62 54 8 8 4 7 12 3 6 4 2 5 3
Armenia 249 115 134 2 2 7 12 2 5 8 12 2 6 2 3 12 4 10 4 3 4 1 10 4
Detailed televoting results of the final[96]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Televote
Austria
Iceland
Azerbaijan
San Marino
Czech Republic
Ireland
Georgia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Malta
Spain
Finland
Switzerland
Denmark
France
Moldova
Armenia
Cyprus
Bulgaria
Netherlands
Latvia
Israel
Belarus
Germany
Russia
Norway
Australia
Belgium
United Kingdom
Croatia
Greece
Lithuania
Serbia
Macedonia
Albania
Estonia
Ukraine
Italy
Poland
Slovenia
Hungary
Montenegro
Sweden
Contestants
Belgium 181 130 51 3 8 4 12 1 2 12 5 4
Czech Republic 41 41 0
Netherlands 153 114 39 6 6 3 7 3 10 2 2
Azerbaijan 117 44 73 1 6 7 8 6 8 1 3 2 8 6 10 7
Hungary 108 52 56 7 1 3 2 1 5 3 4 3 3 2 2 10 1 6 3
Italy 124 90 34 7 3 7 1 1 10 1 4
Israel 135 124 11 6 3 2
Bulgaria 307 127 180 5 8 3 5 5 3 2 8 12 4 5 2 12 1 1 7 4 4 5 10 5 8 1 7 8 10 8 2 7 3 2 4 5 4
Sweden 261 122 139 7 12 4 2 2 1 10 12 2 2 1 3 2 7 2 8 2 7 1 1 7 7 1 3 10 1 10 5 7
Germany 11 1 10 2 8
France 257 148 109 1 5 4 4 2 10 3 3 2 6 7 6 4 12 3 1 7 8 2 4 3 2 5 1 1 3
Poland 229 7 222 12 10 3 7 7 10 4 5 5 5 5 7 1 2 6 10 5 4 6 10 5 10 12 10 4 3 6 2 5 1 8 10 4 8 10
Australia 511 320 191 3 8 2 5 1 6 1 3 12 4 7 1 10 5 5 5 5 6 5 1 5 4 8 4 6 5 5 5 6 3 12 4 4 7 3 3 12
Cyprus 96 43 53 1 6 7 7 2 12 3 3 6 1 5
Serbia 115 35 80 4 12 12 12 12 4 12 12
Lithuania 200 104 96 4 8 12 5 6 3 3 8 12 1 12 4 5 3 2 2 6
Croatia 73 40 33 10 4 5 8 6
Russia 491 130 361 8 7 12 10 10 8 8 6 10 8 8 6 4 6 12 12 10 12 3 12 10 12 12 6 5 6 7 8 10 8 12 8 7 12 12 8 8 10 10 10 8
Spain 77 67 10 2 1 2 4 1
Latvia 132 69 63 6 7 6 2 1 5 1 3 3 12 7 5 5
Ukraine 534 211 323 10 10 12 12 4 10 7 4 7 12 4 3 10 10 10 7 10 7 10 8 10 6 10 4 8 2 5 10 6 10 7 6 6 8 12 12 7 12 8 7
Malta 153 137 16 5 5 6
Georgia 104 80 24 1 8 2 4 6 3
Austria 151 31 120 2 4 1 5 2 6 10 1 8 4 4 4 6 4 3 7 8 3 3 6 1 1 6 4 6 6 5
United Kingdom 62 54 8 3 1 4
Armenia 249 115 134 2 8 12 6 12 7 8 8 8 6 7 2 12 7 8 2 7 2 7 1 2

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of the maximum 12 points awarded by each country's professional jury and televote in the final. Countries in bold gave the maximum 24 points (12 points apiece from professional jury and televoting) to the specified entrant.

12 points awarded by juries
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
11  Ukraine  Bosnia and Herzegovina,  Denmark,  Georgia,  Israel,  Latvia,  Macedonia,  Moldova,  Poland,  San Marino,  Serbia,  Slovenia
9  Australia  Albania,  Austria,  Belgium,  Croatia,  Hungary,  Lithuania,  Netherlands,  Sweden,   Switzerland
4  Russia  Azerbaijan,  Belarus,  Cyprus,  Greece
3  Armenia  Bulgaria,  Russia,  Spain
 Sweden  Czech Republic,  Estonia,  Finland
2  Belgium  Australia,  Ireland
 Italy  France,  Norway
1  France  Armenia
 Georgia  United Kingdom
 Israel  Germany
 Lithuania  Ukraine
 Malta  Montenegro
 Netherlands  Iceland
 Spain  Italy
 United Kingdom  Malta
12 points awarded by televoting
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
10  Russia  Armenia,  Azerbaijan,  Belarus,  Bulgaria,  Estonia,  Germany,  Latvia,  Moldova,  Serbia,  Ukraine
6  Serbia  Bosnia and Herzegovina,  Croatia,  Macedonia,  Montenegro,  Slovenia,   Switzerland
 Ukraine  Czech Republic,  Finland,  Hungary,  Italy,  Poland,  San Marino
3  Armenia  France,  Georgia,  Russia
 Australia  Albania,  Malta,  Sweden
 Lithuania  Ireland,  Norway,  United Kingdom
2  Belgium  Australia,  Netherlands
 Bulgaria  Cyprus,  Spain
 Poland  Austria,  Belgium
 Sweden  Denmark,  Iceland
1  Cyprus  Greece
 France  Israel
 Latvia  Lithuania

Broadcasts[edit]

Most countries sent commentators to Stockholm or commentated from their own country, in order to add insight to the participants and, if necessary, the provision of voting information.

It was reported by the EBU that the contest was viewed by a worldwide television audience of over 200 million viewers,[98][99] beating the 2015 record which was viewed by 197 million.[100]

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Show(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Albania RTSH TVSH, RTSH HD All shows Andri Xhahu [101][102]
RTSH Muzikë, Radio Tirana
 Armenia AMPTV Armenia 1, Public Radio of Armenia All shows Avet Barseghyan [103][104]
 Australia SBS SBS, SBS Radio 4 All shows Julia Zemiro and Sam Pang [105][106]
 Austria ORF ORF eins All shows Andi Knoll [107]
 Azerbaijan İTV All shows Azer Suleymanli [108][109]
 Belarus BTRC Belarus-1, Belarus 24 All shows Evgeny Perlin [110]
 Belgium VRT één All shows Peter Van de Veire [111]
RTBF La Une Jean-Louis Lahaye [fr] and Maureen Louys [112][113]
 Bosnia and Herzegovina BHRT BHT 1, BHT HD, BH Radio 1 All shows Dejan Kukrić [114]
 Bulgaria BNT BNT 1, BNT HD All shows Elena Rosberg and Georgi Kushvaliev [115][116]
 Croatia HRT HRT 1 All shows Duško Ćurlić [117]
HR 2 Zlatko Turkalj [hr]
 Cyprus CyBC RIK 1, RIK Sat, RIK HD, RIK Triton All shows Melina Karageorgiou [118]
 Czech Republic ČT ČT2 Semi-finals Libor Bouček [cs] [119]
ČT1 Final
 Denmark DR DR1 All shows Ole Tøpholm [120]
 Estonia ERR ETV All shows Marko Reikop [121]
ETV+ Aleksandr Hobotov [122]
Raadio 2 SF1/Final Mart Juur and Andrus Kivirähk [123]
 Finland Yle Yle TV2, TV Finland All shows
[124][125]
Yle Radio Suomi Sanna Pirkkalainen and Jorma Hietamäki
Yle Radio Vega Eva Frantz [fi] and Johan Lindroos [126]
 France France Télévisions France 4 Semi-finals Marianne James and Jarry [fr] [127]
France 2 Final Marianne James and Stéphane Bern
 Georgia GPB 1TV All shows Tuta Chkheidze and Nika Katsia [128][129]
 Germany ARD Einsfestival, Phoenix Semi-finals Peter Urban [130][131]
Das Erste Final
 Greece ERT ERT1, ERT HD, ERT World All shows Maria Kozakou and Giorgos Kapoutzidis [132]
Deftero Programma, Voice of Greece
 Hungary MTVA Duna All shows Gábor Gundel Takács [hu] [133]
 Iceland RÚV RÚV, Rás 2 All shows Gísli Marteinn Baldursson [134]
 Ireland RTÉ RTÉ2 Semi-finals Marty Whelan [135]
RTÉ One Final
RTÉ Radio 1 SF2/Final Neil Doherty and Zbyszek Zalinski
 Israel IBA Channel 1 All shows[g] No commentary; Hebrew subtitles [136][137]
Channel 33 SF2/Final No commentary; Arabic subtitles
IBA 88FM Kobi Menora, Or Vaxman and Nancy Brandes [he]
 Italy RAI Rai 4 Semi-finals Marco Ardemagni [it] and Filippo Solibello [it] [138][139][140]
Rai 1 Final Flavio Insinna and Federico Russo
Rai Radio 2 All shows Marco Ardemagni and Filippo Solibello
 Latvia LTV LTV1 All shows Valters Frīdenbergs [141][142]
Final Toms Grēviņš [lv]
 Lithuania LRT LRT, LRT HD, LRT Radijas All shows Darius Užkuraitis [lt] [143]
 Macedonia MRT MRT 1 All shows Karolina Petkovska [144]
 Malta PBS TVM All shows Arthur Caruana [145][146]
 Moldova TRM Moldova 1 All shows Gloria Gorceag [147][148]
Radio Moldova, Radio Moldova Muzical, Radio Moldova Tineret
 Montenegro RTCG TVCG 1, TVCG SAT All shows Dražen Bauković and Tijana Mišković [149][150]
 Netherlands NPO NPO 1, BVN All shows Cornald Maas and Jan Smit [151][152]
SF2 Douwe Bob [153]
 Norway NRK NRK1 All shows Olav Viksmo-Slettan [154]
NRK3 Final Ronny Brede Aase [no], Silje Nordnes [no] and Markus Neby [no] [155]
NRK P1 SF2/Final Ole Christian Øen [156]
 Poland TVP TVP1, TVP Polonia, TVP Rozrywka, TVP HD All shows[h] Artur Orzech [157]
 Russia RTR Russia-1, Russia HD All shows Dmitry Guberniev and Ernest Mackevičius [158]
 San Marino SMRTV San Marino RTV, Radio San Marino All shows Lia Fiorio and Gigi Restivo [159]
 Serbia RTS RTS1, RTS HD, RTS SAT SF1 Dragan Ilić [160]
SF2/Final Duška Vučinić [161][162]
 Slovenia RTVSLO TV SLO 2 [sl] Semi-finals Andrej Hofer [sl] [163]
TV SLO 1 [sl] Final
Radio Val 202 SF2/Final
Radio Maribor [sl] All shows
 Spain RTVE La 2 Semi-finals José María Íñigo and Julia Varela [164]
La 1 Final
 Sweden SVT SVT1 All shows Lotta Bromé [165]
SR P4 Carolina Norén and Björn Kjellman [166]
  Switzerland SRG SSR SRF zwei Semi-finals Sven Epiney [167]
SRF 1 Final
SRF 1, Radio SRF 3 Peter Schneider and Gabriel Vetter [de]
RTS Deux SF2/Final Jean-Marc Richard and Nicolas Tanner [168]
RSI La 2 SF2 Clarissa Tami [it] [169]
RSI La 1 Final Clarissa Tami and Michele "Cerno" Carobbio [170]
 Ukraine UA:PBC UA:Pershyi All shows Timur Miroshnychenko and Tetyana Terekhova [171]
UR   Olena Zelinchenko [172]
 United Kingdom BBC BBC Four Semi-finals Scott Mills and Mel Giedroyc [173][174]
BBC One Final Graham Norton
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Show(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 China HBS Hunan Television All shows Kubert Leung and Wu Zhoutong [175]
 Kazakhstan Khabar Khabar TV All shows Diana Snegina and Kaldybek Zhaysanbay [176]
 Kosovo RTK   All shows   [177]
 New Zealand BBC UKTV Final Graham Norton [178]
 Portugal RTP RTP1 All shows Hélder Reis [pt] and Nuno Galopim [179][180][181][182]
 Slovakia RTVS   Final   [183]
 United States Logo TV Final Carson Kressley and Michelle Collins [184][185]

International sign broadcast[edit]

SVT announced on 22 April 2016 that they would offer International Sign broadcasts of all three live shows for the hearing impaired. All three broadcasts were produced by Julia Kankkonen.[186] The performances of competing entries were interpreted by ten sign language performers and the dialogue of hosts were interpreted by three sign language performers:[187][188][189]

  • Markus Aro (Finland)
  • Ebru Bilen Basaran (Denmark)
  • Vivien Batory (Denmark)
  • Laith Fathulla (Sweden)
  • Rafael-Evitan Grombelka (Germany)
  • Amadeus Lantz (Sweden)
  • Georg Marsh (Austria)
  • Amina Ouahid (Sweden)
  • Tommy Rangsjö (Sweden)
  • Pavel Rodionov (Russia)
  • Laura Levita Valytė (Lithuania)
  • Kolbrún Völkudóttir (Iceland)
  • Xuejia Rennie Zacsko (Sweden)

The international sign broadcasts was streamed online alongside the three live shows,[187] with the following countries also televising the broadcasts:

Incidents[edit]

Disqualification of Romania[edit]

Romania's participation was reported to be in danger on 19 April 2016 due to repeated non-payment of debts by Televiziunea Română (TVR) to the EBU, totalling CHF 16 million (€14.56 million) dating back to January 2007.[194][195] The EBU had requested the Romanian government to repay the debt before 20 April or face exclusion from the contest. The EBU announced on 22 April that after the Romanian government had failed to repay the debt by the deadline, TVR were expelled from the EBU, consequently disqualifying Romania from the contest.[196][197] The Director General of the EBU, Ingrid Deltenre, said that while "it is regrettable that we are forced to take this action […] The continued indebtedness of TVR jeopardizes the financial stability of the EBU itself".[198]

However, because the official album of the contest had been produced before the disqualification, the planned Romanian entry, "Moment of Silence", performed by Ovidiu Anton, would remain on both digital and physical copies of the album.[20] The song had been written following the Colectiv nightclub fire in October 2015.[199]

German artist replacement[edit]

Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) announced on 19 November 2015 that Xavier Naidoo would represent Germany in the contest. However, his selection was criticised due to his history of expressing far-right political views in his actions and lyrics, including a speech made at a protest in 2014 supporting the assertion that the German Reich continues to exist within its pre-World War II borders, his propagation of conspiracy theories surrounding the September 11 attacks and the 2008 financial crisis, and a song in which he referred to Baron Rothschild as "Baron Deadschild" and a "schmuck", as well as a collaboration with Kool Savas titled "Wo sind sie jetzt?", which contained homophobic lyrics which were interpreted as associating homosexuality with paedophilia. Critics of his selection included Johannes Kahrs, who branded the decision "unspeakable and embarrassing", the Amadeu Antonio Foundation and Bild.[200][201][202][203]

In light of the negative response and the need to quickly decide a new selection process, NDR withdrew its proposal to send Naidoo on 21 November. ARD co-ordinator Thomas Schreiber stated that "Xavier Naidoo is a brilliant singer who is, according to my own opinion, neither racist nor homophobe. It was clear that his nomination would polarise opinions, but we were surprised about the negative response. The Eurovision Song Contest is a fun event, in which music and the understanding between European people should be the focus. This characteristic must be kept at all costs."[201][204]

Russian jury votes[edit]

The EBU announced on 10 May 2016 that they were investigating reports of possible rule violations after Russian jury member Anastasia Stotskaya streamed footage of the Russian jury deliberation during the dress rehearsal of the first semi-final on 9 May on the live-streaming social media site Periscope.[205] The video showed one jury member not paying attention to the Dutch performance, while another jury member was filmed during the Armenian performance stating that she will support Armenia "because [her] husband is Armenian". The video also shows jury members on their phones during other performances, as well as a glimpse of Stotskaya's voting result, which also included notes evaluating performances. The rules of the contest stipulate that all jury members are to evaluate performances individually, without discussing the results with other jury members, a stipulation that was clearly violated by the Russian jury.[206]

The EBU released a statement later on 10 May, stating that following talks with Russia-1, the broadcaster proposed to withdraw Stotskaya, declaring her voting results to be invalid, and provide a replacement judge for the final on 14 May. The statement also clarified that the other four jury members submitted a valid jury vote. The EBU also stated that while streaming a video online from the jury deliberation is not considered to be a breach of the rules of the contest, so long as individual rankings, combined rankings or jury points are kept confidential until after the final, it regards Stotskaya's actions "as not in keeping with the spirit of the contest and potentially prejudicial as it imposes a potential risk of accidentally revealing results".[207]

Protests over official flag policy[edit]

In ensuring the apolitical nature of the contest and the safety of attendees, the EBU released an official flag policy on 29 April 2016, which included a list of flags which would be banned from the three live shows. The President of the Basque Country, Iñigo Urkullu, and the Spanish Minister for Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, José Manuel García-Margallo, protested at the specific inclusion of the flag of the Basque Country alongside other flags such as those of some unrecognised nations and the Islamic State, and called on the organisers of the contest to rectify the issue.[208][209] Radiotelevisión Española (RTVE) also expressed their concern to the EBU and requested a rectification,[210] with the EBU responding, saying that while the flag of the Basque Country is not specifically forbidden, it is an example of a banned flag, adding that only the "official national flags of the 42 participating countries, or from one of the countries that have recently taken part", "official national flags of any of the other United Nations member states", the flag of Europe and the rainbow flag were permitted.[211][212]

The EBU issued a statement later on 29 April, clarifying that it was not their intention to publish such a document, while acknowledging that the decision to publish a selection of flags of organisations and territories, each of which were "of a very different nature", was an insensitive one, and apologised for any offence caused by the publication of the original flag policy. The EBU also called on both the Avicii Arena and the contest's official ticketing partner AXS to publish an updated flag policy which did not include examples of banned flags.[210]

The EBU released another statement on 6 May, stating that after discussing the matter with several participating delegations, the organisers of the contest had "agreed to relax the flag policy, and to allow national, regional and local flags of the participants" such as the Welsh flag (as Joe Woolford, representing the United Kingdom as part of Joe and Jake, is Welsh) and the Sami flag (as Agnete, representing Norway, is of Sami heritage), as well as the flags of all UN member states, the flag of the EU and the rainbow flag, as stated in the original flag policy. The EBU also proposed a more tolerant approach to other flags as long as attendees respect the apolitical nature of the contest and do not attempt to deliberately obstruct the camera views. Such a proposal was approved by the contest's Reference Group.[213][214][215]

The Spanish Embassy in Stockholm filed a formal complaint to Swedish police on 15 May after a Spanish citizen carrying the flag of the Basque Country had his flag confiscated by security personnel and was asked along with two of his compatriots to leave the venue. After an urgent intervention by the Spanish Consul, who was present in the arena, the flag was returned to the attendees and they were permitted to return to the venue.[216]

Nagorno-Karabakh flag dispute[edit]

Despite the official flag policy published by the EBU allowing only "national, regional and local flags of the participants" and banning the flag of the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic,[217] during the first voting recap of the first semi-final on 10 May, the Armenian representative Iveta Mukuchyan was filmed in the green room holding the flag of the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, sparking condemnation from the Azerbaijani press.[218][219] The situation further escalated during the semi-final qualifiers' press conference afterwards, where a member of the Azerbaijani press criticised the Armenian delegation and the EBU for allowing the flag to be shown during the show.[220] Responding to a question on the incident from a journalist from Aftonbladet, Mukuchyan stated: "My thoughts are with my Motherland. I want peace everywhere."[221] Commenting on the situation, the Azerbaijani representative Samra stated that "Eurovision is a song contest and it's all about music."[222]

The EBU and the contest's Reference Group released a joint statement on 11 May, strongly condemning Mukuchyan's actions during the first voting recap of the first semi-final and considering it "harmful" to the overall image of the contest. The Reference Group consequently sanctioned Public Television of Armenia (AMPTV), citing a breach of the rule stating that "no messages promoting any organisation, institution, political cause or other causes shall be allowed in the shows". Furthermore, the Reference Group has pointed out that a further breach of the rules of the contest could lead to disqualification from the contest or future contests.[223] The spokesman for the Azerbaijani Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Hikmet Hajiyev, called Mukuchyan's actions "provocative" and unacceptable, claiming that "the Armenian side deliberately resorts to such steps to encourage and promote the illegal formation created in the occupied Azerbaijani territories".[224]

Danish jury result[edit]

BT revealed on 15 May 2016 that Danish professional jury member Hilda Heick, wife of Keld Heick who co-wrote eight Danish entries, had submitted her ranking for the second semi-final and the final the wrong way round,[225] ranking her favourite entry 26th while ranking her least-favourite entry first, in direct opposition to what she had intended to do.[226] As a result of Heick's mistake, the points of the Danish jury would have been different:[227]

  • Instead of 10 points, Australia would have received 12;
  • Instead of 7 points, the Netherlands would have received 10;
  • Instead of 5 points, Lithuania would have received 1;
  • Instead of 4 points, Sweden would have received 7;
  • Instead of 2 points, Israel would have received 4;
  • Instead of 1 point, Spain would have received 5;
  • Instead of receiving no points, France and Russia would have received 2 and 3 points respectively.

The United Kingdom and Ukraine both would have failed to receive any points from the Danish jury. While the overall result was not affected, the margin between second-placed Australia and first-placed Ukraine would have been reduced from 23 points to 9 points.[228]

Protests against the winner[edit]

The Ukrainian winning song, "1944" by Jamala, is about the deportation of the Crimean Tatars in 1944 and particularly about the singer's great-grandmother, who lost her daughter while being deported to Central Asia.[229][230][231] Jamala's song was considered by Russian media and lawmakers to be critical of the Russian annexation of Crimea in 2014 and the war in Donbas.[232][233] A petition was started on Change.org the day after the final, which called on the EBU to void the results in view of Ukraine winning overall despite placing second in both the jury and televote,[234] but the EBU reaffirmed Ukraine's win in response.[235] Later on, a video surfaced depicting Jamala performing "1944" four months before the eligibility date for commercial releases. However, the EBU concluded that "the song was eligible to compete", citing past relaxations of the rule.[236]

Other awards[edit]

In addition to the main winner's trophy, the Marcel Bezençon Awards and the Barbara Dex Award were contested during the 2016 Eurovision Song Contest. The OGAE, "General Organisation of Eurovision Fans" voting poll also took place before the contest.

Marcel Bezençon Awards[edit]

The Marcel Bezençon Awards, organised since 2002 by Sweden's then-Head of Delegation and 1992 representative Christer Björkman, and 1984 winner Richard Herrey, honours songs in the contest's final.[237] The awards were divided into three categories: Artistic Award, Composers Award, and Press Award.[238] The winners were revealed shortly before the final on 14 May.[239]

Category Country Song Performer(s) Songwriter(s)
Artistic Award  Ukraine "1944" Jamala Jamala
Composers Award  Australia "Sound of Silence" Dami Im
Press Award  Russia "You Are the Only One" Sergey Lazarev

OGAE[edit]

OGAE, an organisation of over forty Eurovision Song Contest fan clubs across Europe and beyond, conducts an annual voting poll first held in 2002 as the Marcel Bezençon Fan Award. The 2016 poll ran from 4 April to 2 May with votes from 45 clubs while Bulgaria and Moldova's ones abstained,[240] and after all votes were cast, the top-ranked entry was France's "J'ai cherché" performed by Amir; the top five results are shown below.[241][242][243]

Country Song Performer(s) OGAE result
 France "J'ai cherché" Amir 425
 Russia "You Are the Only One" Sergey Lazarev 392
 Australia "Sound of Silence" Dami Im 280
 Bulgaria "If Love Was a Crime" Poli Genova 175
 Italy "No Degree of Separation" Francesca Michielin 170

Barbara Dex Award[edit]

The Barbara Dex Award is a humorous fan award given to the worst dressed artist each year. Named after Belgium's representative who came last in the 1993 contest, wearing her self-designed dress, the award was handed since 1997. After 20 editions, this was the final poll organised by the fansite House of Eurovision,[244] as they handed the reins to the fansite Songfestival.be shortly after the 2016 contest.[245]

Place Country Performer(s) Votes
1  Croatia Nina Kraljić 770
2  Germany Jamie Lee 335
3   Switzerland Rykka 201
4  Bulgaria Poli Genova 140
5  Bosnia and Herzegovina Dalal and Deen feat. Ana Rucner and Jala 127

Official album[edit]

Cover art of the official album

Eurovision Song Contest: Stockholm 2016 is the official compilation album of the contest, put together by the European Broadcasting Union and was released by Universal Music Group digitally on 15 April and physically on 22 April 2016.[246] The album features all 42 participating entries including the semi-finalists that fail to qualify for the final, as well as the disqualified Romanian entry.[247][20]

Charts[edit]

Chart (2016) Peak
position
Australian Albums (ARIA)[248] 9
Austrian Albums (Ö3 Austria)[249] 3
Finnish Albums (Suomen virallinen lista)[250] 10
French Albums (SNEP)[251] 81
German Compilation Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[252] 2
Greek Albums (IFPI)[253] 14
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[254] 30
Swiss Albums (Schweizer Hitparade)[255] 2
UK Compilation Albums (OCC)[256] 9

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ On behalf of the German public broadcasting consortium ARD[23]
  2. ^ a b Romania, which had been originally allocated into semi-final 2, was disqualified in April 2016 due to repeated non-payment of debts to the EBU by its broadcaster TVR.
  3. ^ Israel, who had been allocated to pot six, were pre-allocated to compete in the second semi-final as the first semi-final coincided with Yom Hazikaron.
  4. ^ a b Despite finishing with the same number of points as the Netherlands, Hungary is deemed to have finished in fourth place due to receiving a greater number of points in the televote.
  5. ^ a b Despite finishing with the same number of points as Finland, Iceland is deemed to have finished in fourteenth place due to receiving a greater number of points in the televote.
  6. ^ a b Despite finishing with the same number of points as Malta, the Netherlands is deemed to have finished in eleventh place due to receiving a greater number of points in the televote.
  7. ^ The first semi-final was broadcast on Channel 1 delayed; the second semi-final and the final were broadcast live.
  8. ^ The three shows were broadcast on TVP Rozrywka and TVP HD with a one day delay.

References[edit]

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