Eurovision Song Contest 2019

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Eurovision Song Contest 2019
Dare to Dream
Dates
Semi-final 114 May 2019
Semi-final 216 May 2019
Final18 May 2019
Host
VenueExpo Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv, Israel
Presenter(s)
Directed by
  • Amir Ukrainitz
  • Sivan Magazanik
Executive supervisorJon Ola Sand
Executive producerZivit Davidovich[1]
Host broadcasterIsraeli Public Broadcasting Corporation (IPBC/Kan)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/tel-aviv-2019 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries41
Number of finalists26
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countriesNone
Non-returning countries Bulgaria
 Ukraine
  • A coloured map of the countries of EuropePortugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019San Marino in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019France in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Latvia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Lithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestAustria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Hungary in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song ContestMontenegro in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Serbia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Albania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019North Macedonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Bulgaria in the Eurovision Song ContestRomania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Moldova in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Ukraine in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Belarus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Australia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Georgia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Azerbaijan in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Turkey in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Armenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestLiechtenstein in the Eurovision Song ContestAndorra in the Eurovision Song ContestMonaco in the Eurovision Song ContestPoland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Czech Republic in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestLebanon in the Eurovision Song ContestTunisia in the Eurovision Song Contest
         Finalist countries     Countries eliminated in the semi-finals     Countries that participated in the past but not in 2019
Vote
Voting systemEach country awards two sets of 12, 10, 8–1 points to ten songs.
Winning song Netherlands
"Arcade"
2018 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2020 → 2021

The Eurovision Song Contest 2019 was the 64th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Tel Aviv, Israel, following the country's victory at the 2018 contest with the song "Toy" by Netta. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster the Israeli Public Broadcasting Corporation (IPBC/Kan), the contest was held at Expo Tel Aviv, and consisted of two semi-finals on 14 and 16 May, and a final on 18 May 2019. The three live shows were presented by Israeli television presenters Erez Tal, Assi Azar and Lucy Ayoub, and Israeli model Bar Refaeli.

Forty-one countries participated in the contest, with Bulgaria and Ukraine not returning after their participation in the previous edition. Bulgaria cited financial difficulties as the reason for its absence, while Ukraine, which had originally planned to participate, ultimately withdrew as a result of a controversy surrounding its national selection.

The winner was the Netherlands with the song "Arcade", performed by Duncan Laurence and written by Laurence along with Joel Sjöö, Wouter Hardy and Will Knox. Italy, Russia, Switzerland and Sweden rounded out the top five; due to a voting error, Norway was originally placed fifth, but placed sixth after a correction. The Netherlands won the combined vote, but placed third in the jury vote after North Macedonia and Sweden, and second in the televote after Norway. Further down the table, North Macedonia and San Marino achieved their best results to date, finishing seventh and 19th respectively.

The EBU reported that the contest had an audience of 182 million viewers in 40 European markets, a decrease of 4 million viewers from the previous edition. However, an increase of two percent in the 15–24 year old age range was reported.[2][3]

The lead-up to the contest was met with controversy on multiple fronts, primarily on issues surrounding the Israeli–Palestinian conflict – this eventually led to demonstrations by interval act performer Madonna and Icelandic entrants Hatari during the broadcast of the final.

Location[edit]

Expo Tel Aviv (Pavilion 2) – host venue of the 2019 contest

The 2019 contest took place in Tel Aviv, Israel, following the country's victory at the 2018 edition with the song "Toy", performed by Netta. It was the third time that Israel had hosted the contest, after having hosted the 1979 and 1999 contests in Jerusalem.[4] The selected venue was Expo Tel Aviv's 7,300-seat congress and convention centre in "Bitan 2" (Pavilion 2), which was opened in January 2015.[5][6] Located on Rokach Boulevard in northern Tel Aviv, the convention centre serves as a venue for many events, including concerts, exhibitions, trade fairs, and conferences. The fairground has ten halls and pavilions, plus a large outdoor space. The new pavilion had recently hosted the 2018 European Judo Championships from 26 to 28 April.[7]

Bidding phase[edit]

Locations of the candidate cities: the chosen host city is marked in blue. The shortlisted cities are marked in green, while the eliminated cities are marked in red.

After Israel's victory in the 2018 contest in Lisbon, Portugal, Netta and the Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu stated that the 2019 contest would be held in Jerusalem, but this was yet to be confirmed by the Israeli Public Broadcasting Corporation (IPBC/Kan) and the European Broadcasting Union (EBU).[4] Israeli finance minister Moshe Kahlon also said in an interview the event would be held solely in Jerusalem and estimated its cost at 120 million Israeli shekels (approximately €29 million).[8] The mayor of Jerusalem, Nir Barkat, mentioned Jerusalem Arena and Teddy Stadium as possible venues to host the event.[9] The municipality of Jerusalem confirmed that because it lacked the seating capacity, the contest would not be held at the International Convention Centre, which had hosted the contest in 1979 and 1999.[10]

On 18 June 2018, Netanyahu stated that Israel had committed to remaining in compliance with EBU rules regarding the constitution of member broadcasters, so as not to affect its hosting of Eurovision. Kan's establishment included a condition that news programming would be delegated later to a second public broadcasting entity. This would have violated EBU rules requiring member broadcasters to have their own internal news departments.[11][12]

The following day, Israel was officially confirmed as the host country,[13] and on 24 June 2018, Kan formally opened the bidding process for cities interested in hosting the 2019 contest.[14] Israeli deputy minister Michael Oren stated that Jerusalem did not have the resources to host the contest on 28 July, reiterating that Tel Aviv was the more likely host.[15]

Soon afterwards, reports surfaced of the government not providing the €12 million downpayment requested by Kan to cover hosting expenses and security.[16] Following a tense back-and-forth between Kan and the government, a compromise between the two parties was reached on 29 July 2018 that would see Kan paying the €12 million to the EBU and the Finance Ministry covering expenses should complications arise. The mayor of Tel Aviv, Ron Huldai, announced that the city would be willing to pay for the convention centre itself, should it be chosen as the host city.[16][17]

In the week of 27 August 2018, executive supervisor Jon Ola Sand led a handful of EBU delegates around Israel to look at potential venues in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv and to hear the bid from Eilat. On 30 August 2018, Sand stated in an interview with Kan that Eilat was no longer in the running to host, leaving Jerusalem and Tel Aviv as the remaining cities in the running. He added that there was no serious discussion among members of the EBU about boycotting the event.[18]

On 13 September 2018, the EBU announced Tel Aviv as the host city, with Expo Tel Aviv as the chosen venue for the 2019 contest.[5]

Key:  †  Host venue  ‡  Shortlisted venues

City[19] Venue Notes
Eilat[20] Hangars on the port Proposal intended to connect two hangars to a hall, in order to meet the EBU's capacity and venue requirements.
Haifa Sammy Ofer Stadium Candidacy had been dependent on the construction of a roof.
Jerusalem Pais Arena Indoor arena similar to the venues of recent contests. It was Jerusalem's preferred venue, in case it was chosen to be the host city.
Teddy Stadium Candidacy had been dependent on the construction of a roof.
Tel Aviv Expo Tel Aviv (Pavilion 2) The IPBC expected Pavilion 2 to have room for up to 9,000 attendees, while an additional 1,500 fans will be able to gather in the greenroom.[21]

Other sites[edit]

Location of host venue (red) and other contest-related sites and events (blue)

Located at the Charles Clore Park in Tel Aviv, the Eurovision Village was the official Eurovision Song Contest fan and sponsors' area during the events week. It was open from 12 to 18 May 2019.[22][23] There it was possible to watch performances by local artists, as well as the live shows broadcast from the main venue.

The EuroClub was located at Hangar 11 in Tel Aviv Port and was the venue for the official after-parties and private performances by contest participants. Unlike the Eurovision Village, access to the EuroClub was restricted to accredited fans, delegates, and press.[23]

The "Orange Carpet" event, where the contestants and their delegations are presented before the accredited press and fans, took place at Habima Square in central Tel Aviv on 12 May 2019, followed by the Opening Ceremony at the Charles Bronfman Auditorium.[23][24]

Participating countries[edit]

Eurovision Song Contest 2019 – Participation summaries by country

Eligibility for potential participation in the Eurovision Song Contest requires a national broadcaster with active EBU membership capable of receiving the contest via the Eurovision network and broadcasting it live nationwide. The EBU issued an invitation to participate in the contest to all active members. The Israeli minister of communications, Ayoob Kara, also invited other countries from the MENA region. With some Israel largely had tense relationships and with others no diplomatic relations at all. Kara pointed out that Tunisia and the Gulf states, including Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, were invited.[25][26] Tunisia is eligible to participate, but has not due to laws banning the promotion of Israeli content, while the Gulf states do not have national broadcasters with EBU membership.

The EBU initially announced on 7 November 2018 that 42 countries would participate in the contest, with Bulgaria opting not to participate for financial reasons.[27][28] Ukraine announced its withdrawal from the contest on 27 February 2019, thereby reducing the number of participating countries to 41.[29]

On 6 March 2019, the EBU confirmed that North Macedonia would take part for the first time under its new name, instead of the previous name of Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia which had been used since the country's debut in 1998.[30]

Participants of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019[31]
Country Broadcaster Artist Song Language Songwriter(s)
 Albania RTSH Jonida Maliqi "Ktheju tokës" Albanian Eriona Rushiti
 Armenia AMPTV Srbuk "Walking Out" English
 Australia SBS Kate Miller-Heidke "Zero Gravity" English
 Austria ORF Paenda "Limits" English Paenda
 Azerbaijan İTV Chingiz "Truth" English
 Belarus BTRC Zena "Like It" English
 Belgium RTBF Eliot "Wake Up" English
 Croatia HRT Roko "The Dream" English, Croatian
 Cyprus CyBC Tamta "Replay" English
 Czech Republic ČT Lake Malawi "Friend of a Friend" English
 Denmark DR Leonora "Love Is Forever" English, French, Danish
 Estonia ERR Victor Crone "Storm" English
 Finland Yle Darude feat. Sebastian Rejman "Look Away" English
 France France Télévisions Bilal Hassani "Roi" French, English
 Georgia GPB Oto Nemsadze "Keep On Going" Georgian
  • Diana Giorgadze
  • Roma Giorgadze
 Germany NDR[a] Sisters "Sister" English
 Greece ERT Katerine Duska "Better Love" English
 Hungary MTVA Joci Pápai "Az én apám" Hungarian
 Iceland RÚV Hatari "Hatrið mun sigra" Icelandic Hatari
 Ireland RTÉ Sarah McTernan "22" English
 Israel IPBC Kobi Marimi "Home" English
  • Ohad Shragai
  • Inbar Wizman
 Italy RAI Mahmood "Soldi" Italian
 Latvia LTV Carousel "That Night" English
  • Mārcis Vasiļevskis
  • Sabīne Žuga
 Lithuania LRT Jurij Veklenko "Run with the Lions" English
 Malta PBS Michela "Chameleon" English
 Moldova TRM Anna Odobescu "Stay" English
 Montenegro RTCG D mol "Heaven" English
  • Dejan Božović
  • Adis Eminić
 Netherlands AVROTROS Duncan Laurence "Arcade" English
 North Macedonia MRT Tamara Todevska "Proud" English
  • Robert Bilbilov
  • Lazar Cvetkoski
  • Darko Dimitrov
  • Kosta Petrov
  • Sanja Popovska
 Norway NRK Keiino "Spirit in the Sky" English, Northern Sámi
 Poland TVP Tulia "Fire of Love (Pali się)" Polish, English
  • Nadia Dalin
  • Jude Friedman
  • Sonia Krasny
  • Allan Rich
 Portugal RTP Conan Osíris "Telemóveis" Portuguese Conan Osíris
 Romania TVR Ester Peony "On a Sunday" English
 Russia RTR Sergey Lazarev "Scream" English
 San Marino SMRTV Serhat "Say Na Na Na" English
 Serbia RTS Nevena Božović "Kruna" (Круна) Serbian
 Slovenia RTVSLO Zala Kralj and Gašper Šantl "Sebi" Slovene
 Spain RTVE Miki "La venda" Spanish Adrià Salas
 Sweden SVT John Lundvik "Too Late for Love" English
  Switzerland SRG SSR Luca Hänni "She Got Me" English
  • Laurell Barker
  • Jon Hällgren
  • Lukas Hällgren
  • Luca Hänni
  • Mac Frazer
 United Kingdom BBC Michael Rice "Bigger than Us" English
  • Laurell Barker
  • Anna-Klara Folin
  • John Lundvik
  • Jonas Thander

Returning artists[edit]

The contest featured five representatives who had performed previously as lead vocalists for the same countries. Two of them participated in 2016Sergey Lazarev represented Russia and won the semi-final, while Serhat represented San Marino in the semi-final.[33][34] Joci Pápai represented Hungary in 2017.[35] Tamara Todevska represented Macedonia (now named North Macedonia) in the 2008 semi-final, alongside Vrčak and Adrian, and backed in 2004 and 2014 for Toše Proeski and Tijana Dapčević, respectively.[36] Nevena Božović represented Serbia in the semi-final of 2013 as part of Moje 3, and in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2007. The contest also featured a former backing vocalist representing his country for the first time—Jurij Veklenko provided backup for Lithuania in 2013 and 2015.

On the other hand, previous representatives returned to provide supporting vocals for their own or another country. Mikheil Javakhishvili, Georgia's representative in 2018 as part of Ethno-Jazz Band Iriao, backed Oto Nemsadze.[37] Mikel Hennet, who represented Spain in 2007 as part of D'Nash, backed Miki.[38] Stig Rästa, Estonia's representative in 2015 alongside Elina Born, backed Victor Crone.[39] Mladen Lukić, who represented Serbia in 2018 as part of Balkanika, backed Nevena Božović.[40] Sahlene, who represented Estonia in 2002, and provided backing for her native country Sweden in 1999, for Malta in 2000 and for Australia in 2016, backed for the United Kingdom this time.[41] Jacques Houdek, who represented Croatia in 2017, backed Roko.[42] Émilie Satt, who represented France in 2018 as part of Madame Monsieur, backed Bilal Hassani.[43] Destiny Chukunyere, who won the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2015 for Malta, backed Michela.[44]

Other countries[edit]

Active EBU members[edit]

Despite confirming their preliminary participation in the 2019 contest, Bulgarian broadcaster BNT announced in October 2018 that they would withdraw because of financial difficulties and to allow members of the delegation to moving onto other projects.[45][28] Due to the controversy surrounding its national selection, on 27 February 2019, Ukrainian broadcaster UA:PBC also announced the withdrawal of the country from the contest,[29] but aired the show nonetheless.[46]

Active EBU member broadcasters in Andorra, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovakia and Turkey confirmed non-participation prior to the announcement of the participants list by the EBU.[47][48][49][50][51][52][53]

Associate EBU members[edit]

In late 2017, claims by the Kazakh Ministry of Culture and Sport that Channel 31 had finalised negotiations with the EBU, allowing the country to debut in 2019,[54] were dismissed by the EBU, explaining that they were ineligible due to being located outside the European Broadcasting Area and also not being a member of the Council of Europe.[55][56] Kazakhstan was later invited to participate in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2018,[57] but the EBU stated that the decision was made solely by the Junior Eurovision Steering Group, and there were no current plans to invite associate members to the adult contest;[58] it was then clarified that this could change in the future,[59] though not in 2019.[60]

Non-EBU members[edit]

As of June 2018, Kosovan broadcaster RTK was pushing for full EBU membership in order to be able to take part in the 2019 contest,[61] but the vote to decide would not be held until June 2019.[62] In late 2017, Liechtensteiner broadcaster 1 FL TV, confirmed that they were applying for EBU membership in order to debut in the 2019 contest,[63] already planning to select their entry through a national final;[64] however, by mid-2018 1 FL TV had not yet applied for membership[65] due to the sudden death of the broadcaster's director, Peter Kölbel.[66]

Production[edit]

Visual design[edit]

The graphic design of the 2019 contest on display in Tel Aviv

The contest's slogan, "Dare to Dream", was unveiled on 28 October 2018,[67] while the official logo and branding were revealed on 8 January 2019. Designed by Awesome Tel Aviv and Studio Adam Feinberg, it consists of layered triangles designed to resemble a star, reflecting "the stars of the future" coming to Tel Aviv.[68]

Stage design[edit]

The stage design for the 2019 contest was revealed on 27 December 2018 and was designed by German production designer Florian Wieder, who also devised the stage concepts for the 2011–12, 2015 and 2017–18 contests.[69] Inspired by the Star of David, the diamond-shaped stage was 250 square metres, with 130 overhead LED triangles, two 25m runways with connecting bridges and a 36m × 12m LED wall composed of 12 rotational vertical screens representing the Twelve Tribes of Israel.[70][71][72] Unlike in previous years, the green room was placed in a separate building to the main performance venue due to limited capacity.[73] Following the contest, Wieder was accused of plagiarism by German design studio WHITEvoid for similarities to a stage designed for Brazilian singer Luan Santana in 2014.[74]

Postcards[edit]

Filmed between March and April 2019, and directed by Keren Hochma, the 2019 postcards involved the act travelling to a location in Israel that resembles that of their own country.[75] An imaginary play button circled above the act's head, and, when the act pressed it, they performed a themed dance and threw the play button towards the screen, afterwards, it "flies over" to the stage where the ceiling lit up with their country's flag using augmented reality. The dances in each postcard were wide-ranging and included parkour, ballet and street dance, among other styles. The following locations were used:[76]

Presenters[edit]

Presenters from left to right: Assi Azar, Bar Refaeli, Lucy Ayoub, and Erez Tal, Tel Aviv, 16 May 2019

On 25 January 2019, Kan announced that four presenters would host the three shows: TV hosts Erez Tal (who was also one of the Israeli commentators for the 2018 final) and Assi Azar (who works for the Israeli Channel 12), supermodel Bar Refaeli and Kan host Lucy Ayoub (who was also the Israeli jury spokesperson at the 2018 contest).[77] Tal and Refaeli were the main hosts, while Azar and Ayoub hosted the green room.[78]

Format[edit]

Voting system[edit]

On 30 March 2019, the EBU announced that the presentation of the televoting results during the final would change for the first time since the current voting system was introduced in 2016.[79] The jury results' presentation remained the same with a live spokesperson in each participating country revealing the top song from their national jury that earned 12 points.[80] In a change from previous years, the televoting result was revealed in the order of jury ranking, from the lowest to the highest.[81]

Semi-final allocation draw[edit]

Results of the semi-final allocation draw
  Participating countries in the first semi-final[b]
  Pre-qualified for the final but also voting in the first semi-final
  Participating countries in the second semi-final
  Pre-qualified for the final but also voting in the second semi-final

The draw to determine the participating countries' semi-finals took place on 28 January 2019 at 17:00 CET, at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.[82] The thirty-six semi-finalists were divided over six pots, based on historical voting patterns as calculated by the contest's official televoting partner Digame. The purpose of drawing from different pots was to reduce the chance of "bloc voting" and to increase suspense in the semi-finals. The draw also determined which semi-final each of the six automatic qualifiers – host country Israel and "Big Five" countries France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom – would broadcast and vote in. The ceremony was hosted by contest presenters Assi Azar and Lucy Ayoub, and included the passing of the host city insignia from Duarte Cordeiro, vice mayor of Lisbon (host city of the previous contest) to Ron Huldai, mayor of Tel Aviv.[83]

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4 Pot 5 Pot 6

Contest overview[edit]

Semi-final 1[edit]

The first semi-final took place on 14 May 2019 at 22:00 IDT (21:00 CEST).[84] Seventeen countries participated in the first semi-final. Ukraine was originally allocated to participate in the second half of the semi-final, but withdrew from the contest due to controversy over its national selection.[29] Australia won the most points, followed by the Czech Republic, Iceland, Estonia, Greece, Slovenia, Serbia, San Marino, Cyprus and Belarus. The countries that failed to reach the final were Poland, Hungary, Belgium, Georgia, Portugal, Montenegro and Finland.[85] All the countries competing in this semi-final were eligible to vote, plus France, Israel and Spain.[86]

The first semi-final was opened by Netta performing a new version of her winning song "Toy", while the interval featured Dana International with "Just the Way You Are".[87] The French, Israeli and Spanish artists were then interviewed, and clips of their competing songs were played.

  Qualifiers
Participants and results of the first semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019
R/O[88] Country[88] Artist[88] Song[88] Points Place
1  Cyprus Tamta "Replay" 149 9
2  Montenegro D mol "Heaven" 46 16
3  Finland Darude feat. Sebastian Rejman "Look Away" 23 17
4  Poland Tulia "Fire of Love (Pali się)" 120 11
5  Slovenia Zala Kralj and Gašper Šantl "Sebi" 167 6
6  Czech Republic Lake Malawi "Friend of a Friend" 242 2
7  Hungary Joci Pápai "Az én apám" 97 12
8  Belarus Zena "Like It" 122 10
9  Serbia Nevena Božović "Kruna" 156 7
10  Belgium Eliot "Wake Up" 70 13
11  Georgia Oto Nemsadze "Keep On Going" 62 14
12  Australia Kate Miller-Heidke "Zero Gravity" 261 1
13  Iceland Hatari "Hatrið mun sigra" 221 3
14  Estonia Victor Crone "Storm" 198 4
15  Portugal Conan Osíris "Telemóveis" 51 15
16  Greece Katerine Duska "Better Love" 185 5
17  San Marino Serhat "Say Na Na Na" 150 8

Semi-final 2[edit]

The second semi-final took place on 16 May 2019 at 22:00 IDT (21:00 CEST).[84] Eighteen countries participated in the second semi-final. Switzerland was pre-drawn into this semi-final due to scheduling issues.[86] The Netherlands won the most points, followed by North Macedonia, Sweden, Switzerland, Azerbaijan, Russia, Norway, Malta, Albania and Denmark. The countries that failed to reach the final were Lithuania, Moldova, Romania, Croatia, Latvia, Armenia, Austria and Ireland.[89] All the countries competing in this semi-final were eligible to vote, plus Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom.[86]

The second semi-final included Shalva Band performing "A Million Dreams" and mentalist Lior Suchard as interval acts.[23] The British, German and Italian artists were then interviewed, and clips of their competing songs were played.

  Qualifiers
Participants and results of the second semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019
R/O[90] Country[90] Artist[90] Song[90] Points Place
1  Armenia Srbuk "Walking Out" 49 16
2  Ireland Sarah McTernan "22" 16 18
3  Moldova Anna Odobescu "Stay" 85 12
4   Switzerland Luca Hänni "She Got Me" 232 4
5  Latvia Carousel "That Night" 50 15
6  Romania Ester Peony "On a Sunday" 71 13
7  Denmark Leonora "Love Is Forever" 94 10
8  Sweden John Lundvik "Too Late for Love" 238 3
9  Austria Paenda "Limits" 21 17
10  Croatia Roko "The Dream" 64 14
11  Malta Michela "Chameleon" 157 8
12  Lithuania Jurij Veklenko "Run with the Lions" 93 11
13  Russia Sergey Lazarev "Scream" 217 6
14  Albania Jonida Maliqi "Ktheju tokës" 96 9
15  Norway Keiino "Spirit in the Sky" 210 7
16  Netherlands Duncan Laurence "Arcade" 280 1
17  North Macedonia Tamara Todevska "Proud" 239 2
18  Azerbaijan Chingiz "Truth" 224 5

Final[edit]

Madonna performed "Like a Prayer", "Dark Ballet" and "Future" as an interval act in the final.

The final took place on 18 May 2019 at 22:00 IDT (21:00 CEST).[84] Twenty-six countries participated in the final, with all forty-one participating countries eligible to vote. The running order for the final was published on 17 May 2019.[91]

The final was opened with the traditional flag parade introducing the 26 finalists, which featured Dana International performing "Tel Aviv" and "Diva", Ilanit performing "Ey Sham", and Nadav Guedj performing "Golden Boy". In the interval, five former Eurovision participants were featured in the "Switch Song" interval act: Conchita Wurst performed "Heroes", Måns Zelmerlöw performed "Fuego", Eleni Foureira performed "Dancing Lasha Tumbai", Verka Serduchka performed "Toy", and Gali Atari, together with the four above-mentioned artists, performed her winning song "Hallelujah". Idan Raichel then performed "Bo'ee – Come to Me" together with the Idan Raichel Project. Netta then performed her new single "Nana Banana", followed by Madonna performing "Like a Prayer", "Dark Ballet" and "Future", the latter with Quavo.[92][93][94] Actress and model Gal Gadot also appeared in a short video skit on Tel Aviv as a tourist destination.[23][95][96][97]

Madonna's interval performance in the final was heavily criticised due to her poor vocal showing, and further criticisms were raised when her official YouTube channel uploaded a video of the performance with the vocals auto-tuned.[98] Madonna's representatives at Live Nation were subject to a lawsuit by host broadcaster Kan in September 2019, four months after the contest ended.[99]

  Winner
Participants and results of the final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019
R/O[100] Country[100] Artist[100] Song[100] Points Place[101]
1  Malta Michela "Chameleon" 107 14
2  Albania Jonida Maliqi "Ktheju tokës" 90 17
3  Czech Republic Lake Malawi "Friend of a Friend" 157 11
4  Germany Sisters "Sister" 24 25
5  Russia Sergey Lazarev "Scream" 370 3
6  Denmark Leonora "Love Is Forever" 120 12
7  San Marino Serhat "Say Na Na Na" 77 19
8  North Macedonia Tamara Todevska "Proud" 305 7
9  Sweden John Lundvik "Too Late for Love" 334 5
10  Slovenia Zala Kralj and Gašper Šantl "Sebi" 105 15
11  Cyprus Tamta "Replay" 109 13
12  Netherlands Duncan Laurence "Arcade" 498 1
13  Greece Katerine Duska "Better Love" 74 21
14  Israel Kobi Marimi "Home" 35 23
15  Norway Keiino "Spirit in the Sky" 331 6
16  United Kingdom Michael Rice "Bigger than Us" 11 26
17  Iceland Hatari "Hatrið mun sigra" 232 10
18  Estonia Victor Crone "Storm" 76 20
19  Belarus Zena "Like It" 31 24
20  Azerbaijan Chingiz "Truth" 302 8
21  France Bilal Hassani "Roi" 105 16
22  Italy Mahmood "Soldi" 472 2
23  Serbia Nevena Božović "Kruna" 89 18
24   Switzerland Luca Hänni "She Got Me" 364 4
25  Australia Kate Miller-Heidke "Zero Gravity" 284 9
26  Spain Miki "La venda" 54 22

Spokespersons[edit]

The spokespersons announced the 12-point score from their respective country's national jury in the following order:[102][103]

  1.  Portugal – Inês Lopes Gonçalves [pt]
  2.  Azerbaijan – Faig Aghayev
  3.  Malta – Ben Camille
  4.  North Macedonia – Nikola Trajkovski
  5.  San Marino – Monica Fabbri
  6.  Netherlands – Emma Wortelboer
  7.  Montenegro – Ajda Šufta
  8.  Estonia – Kelly Sildaru
  9.  Poland – Mateusz Szymkowiak
  10.  Norway – Alexander Rybak
  11.  Spain – Nieves Álvarez
  12.  Austria – Philipp Hansa
  13.  United Kingdom – Rylan Clark-Neal
  14.  Italy – Ema Stokholma [it]
  15.  Albania – Andri Xhahu
  16.  Hungary – Bence Forró [hu]
  17.  Moldova – Doina Stimpovschi
  18.  Ireland – Sinéad Kennedy
  19.  Belarus – Maria Vasilevich
  20.  Armenia – Aram Mp3
  21.  Romania – Ilinca
  22.  Cyprus – Hovig
  23.  Australia – Electric Fields
  24.  Russia – Ivan Bessonov
  25.  Germany – Barbara Schöneberger
  26.  Belgium – David Jeanmotte [fr]
  27.  Sweden – Eric Saade
  28.  Croatia – Monika Lelas Halambek
  29.  Lithuania – Giedrius Masalskis [lt]
  30.  Serbia – Dragana Kosjerina
  31.  Iceland – Jóhannes Haukur Jóhannesson
  32.  Georgia – Gaga Abashidze
  33.  Greece – Gus G
  34.  Latvia – Laura Rizzotto
  35.  Czech Republic – Radka Rosická [cs]
  36.  Denmark – Rasmussen
  37.  France – Julia Molkhou [fr]
  38.  Finland – Christoffer Strandberg [fi]
  39.   Switzerland – Sinplus
  40.  Slovenia – Lea Sirk
  41.  Israel – Izhar Cohen

Detailed voting results[edit]

Correction of the results[edit]

The Belarusian jury was dismissed following the revelation of their votes in the first semi-final, which is contrary to the rules of the contest. To comply with the contest's voting regulations, the EBU worked with its voting partner, Digame, to create a substitute aggregated result (calculated based on the results of other countries with similar voting records), which was approved by voting monitor Ernst & Young, to determine the Belarusian jury votes for the final. In these results, Israel, which did not receive points from any other jury during the final, received 12 points from Belarus.

However, Twitter user @euro_bruno noted on 19 May that an incorrect substitute Belarusian result was purportedly used during the broadcast of the final.[104] The mistake was later confirmed in a statement issued by the EBU on 22 May. According to the statement, the EBU "discovered that due to a human error an incorrect aggregated result was used. This had no impact on the calculation of points derived from televoting across the 41 participating countries and the overall winner and Top 4 songs of the contest remain unchanged. To respect both the artists and EBU Members which took part, [it wished] to correct the grand final results in accordance with the rules."[105]

The error, a reversal of the Belarusian aggregated votes, led to the bottom ten countries receiving points instead of the top ten. Malta, which had been incorrectly ranked last, would receive Belarus' 12 jury points, and Israel would end up with no jury points. The corrected point totals also changed some rankings: Sweden finished fifth overall instead of Norway, Belarus finished 24th overall instead of Germany, San Marino ended 19th despite losing four points, and North Macedonia won the jury vote instead of Sweden.[106][107]

The mistake made by the EBU and its voting partner was criticised. Dutch newspaper Algemeen Dagblad said the EBU had to present the new vote totals "blushing with shame", calling the situation "chaos".[108] British newspaper Metro thought the EBU had "screwed up", while the Daily Mirror named the accidental reversal of the aggregated vote total a "scandalous blunder".[109][110]

A similar situation occurred in the 1976, 1977, 1979, 1996 and 1998 contests, and in the semi-final of the 2004 contest, whereupon the results also had to be corrected after the broadcast due to an error with the votes.

The corrected results have been used in all following scoreboards (where applicable).

Semi-final 1[edit]

  Qualifiers
Split results of semi-final 1
Place Combined Jury Televoting
Country Points Country Points Country Points
1  Australia 261  Czech Republic 157  Iceland 151
2  Czech Republic 242  Greece 131  Australia 140
3  Iceland 221  Australia 121  Estonia 133
4  Estonia 198  Cyprus 95  San Marino 124
5  Greece 185  Serbia 91  Slovenia 93
6  Slovenia 167  Belarus 78  Czech Republic 85
7  Serbia 156  Slovenia 74  Serbia 65
8  San Marino 150  Iceland 70  Poland 60
9  Cyprus 149  Hungary 65  Greece 54
10  Belarus 122  Estonia 65  Cyprus 54
11  Poland 120  Poland 60  Belarus 44
12  Hungary 97  Belgium 50  Portugal 43
13  Belgium 70  Montenegro 31  Georgia 33
14  Georgia 62  Georgia 29  Hungary 32
15  Portugal 51  San Marino 26  Belgium 20
16  Montenegro 46  Finland 9  Montenegro 15
17  Finland 23  Portugal 8  Finland 14
Detailed jury voting results of semi-final 1[111]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Jury vote
Cyprus
Montenegro
Finland
Poland
Slovenia
Czech Republic
Hungary
Belarus
Serbia
Belgium
Georgia
Australia
Iceland
Estonia
Portugal
Greece
San Marino
France
Israel
Spain
Contestants
Cyprus 149 95 54 8 4 7 10 4 8 3 5 1 8 1 12 8 6 4 6
Montenegro 46 31 15 4 12 5 10
Finland 23 9 14 1 2 4 2
Poland 120 60 60 10 3 7 8 6 3 8 7 3 5
Slovenia 167 74 93 5 1 5 8 12 3 7 7 4 5 8 1 4 4
Czech Republic 242 157 85 1 3 8 7 12 10 7 10 8 12 12 10 12 12 8 3 8 6 8
Hungary 97 65 32 6 1 6 2 4 2 6 2 1 6 5 7 10 7
Belarus 122 78 44 8 8 12 4 4 3 3 10 6 7 1 4 1 7
Serbia 156 91 65 6 7 3 10 5 6 7 5 6 3 6 6 4 6 5 3 3
Belgium 70 50 20 10 2 3 6 3 2 4 10 2 3 5
Georgia 62 29 33 7 2 1 2 10 5 2
Australia 261 121 140 5 12 12 5 8 5 12 4 12 1 2 10 6 7 8 12
Iceland 221 70 151 8 4 4 5 4 1 1 10 10 2 2 7 12
Estonia 198 65 133 6 1 6 12 1 7 8 7 5 1 10 1
Portugal 51 8 43 3 2 2 1
Greece 185 131 54 12 12 7 10 5 4 5 2 6 10 7 8 4 12 5 12 10
San Marino 150 26 124 2 10 3 1 2 3 3 2
Detailed televoting results of semi-final 1[111]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Televote
Cyprus
Montenegro
Finland
Poland
Slovenia
Czech Republic
Hungary
Belarus
Serbia
Belgium
Georgia
Australia
Iceland
Estonia
Portugal
Greece
San Marino
France
Israel
Spain
Contestants
Cyprus 149 95 54 4 1 3 1 10 3 1 12 10 8 1
Montenegro 46 31 15 7 8
Finland 23 9 14 2 12
Poland 120 60 60 6 1 7 6 5 5 5 8 2 5 8 2
Slovenia 167 74 93 8 7 8 5 7 8 10 3 5 5 7 7 5 3 2 3
Czech Republic 242 157 85 2 3 5 5 5 4 3 1 6 1 10 12 8 4 1 4 6 5
Hungary 97 65 32 2 3 6 2 12 1 3 3
Belarus 122 78 44 6 5 2 2 3 4 7 2 6 1 2 4
Serbia 156 91 65 5 12 1 4 12 4 2 4 3 3 6 2 6 1
Belgium 70 50 20 3 1 1 4 2 5 4
Georgia 62 29 33 10 1 10 1 4 7
Australia 261 121 140 4 7 8 10 4 10 5 10 7 10 10 5 10 8 6 7 12 7
Iceland 221 70 151 1 6 12 12 10 6 10 12 6 7 6 12 6 8 7 7 10 3 10
Estonia 198 65 133 7 2 10 7 8 8 8 6 3 12 8 7 7 12 3 8 1 10 6
Portugal 51 8 43 3 2 8 2 4 12 12
Greece 185 131 54 12 1 1 2 4 4 8 5 12 3 2
San Marino 150 26 124 8 10 4 6 3 12 12 7 5 2 12 6 4 10 6 4 5 8

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of the maximum 12 points awarded by each country's professional jury and televote in the first semi-final. Countries in bold gave the maximum 24 points (12 points apiece from professional jury and televoting) to the specified entrant.

12 points awarded by juries
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
5  Australia  Belgium,  Finland,  Iceland,  Poland,  Spain
 Czech Republic  Australia,  Estonia,  Georgia,  Portugal,  Slovenia
4  Greece  Cyprus,  Israel,  Montenegro,  San Marino
1  Belarus  Hungary
 Cyprus  Greece
 Estonia  Belarus
 Iceland  France
 Montenegro  Serbia
 Slovenia  Czech Republic
12 points awarded by televoting
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
4  Iceland  Australia,  Belarus,  Finland,  Poland
3  San Marino  Czech Republic,  Georgia,  Hungary
2  Estonia  Belgium,  Portugal
 Greece  Cyprus,  San Marino
 Portugal  France,  Spain
 Serbia  Montenegro,  Slovenia
1  Australia  Israel
 Cyprus  Greece
 Czech Republic  Iceland
 Finland  Estonia
 Hungary  Serbia

Semi-final 2[edit]

  Qualifiers
Split results of semi-final 2
Place Combined Jury Televoting
Country Points Country Points Country Points
1  Netherlands 280  North Macedonia 155  Norway 170
2  North Macedonia 239  Sweden 150  Netherlands 140
3  Sweden 238  Netherlands 140   Switzerland 137
4   Switzerland 232  Malta 107  Russia 124
5  Azerbaijan 224  Azerbaijan 103  Azerbaijan 121
6  Russia 217   Switzerland 95  Sweden 88
7  Norway 210  Russia 93  North Macedonia 84
8  Malta 157  Moldova 58  Lithuania 77
9  Albania 96  Denmark 53  Albania 58
10  Denmark 94  Romania 47  Malta 50
11  Lithuania 93  Norway 40  Denmark 41
12  Moldova 85  Albania 38  Croatia 38
13  Romania 71  Latvia 37  Moldova 27
14  Croatia 64  Armenia 26  Romania 24
15  Latvia 50  Croatia 26  Armenia 23
16  Armenia 49  Austria 21  Latvia 13
17  Austria 21  Lithuania 16  Ireland 3
18  Ireland 16  Ireland 13  Austria 0
Detailed jury voting results of semi-final 2[112]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Jury vote
Armenia
Ireland
Moldova
Switzerland
Latvia
Romania
Denmark
Sweden
Austria
Croatia
Malta
Lithuania
Russia
Albania
Norway
Netherlands
North Macedonia
Azerbaijan
Germany
Italy
United Kingdom
Contestants
Armenia 49 26 23 2 4 2 1 1 6 6 2 2
Ireland 16 13 3 5 8
Moldova 85 58 27 5 5 12 6 2 5 5 3 2 6 3 4
Switzerland 232 95 137 6 10 3 4 12 7 10 5 2 5 8 8 5 2 8
Latvia 50 37 13 3 7 6 7 1 3 5 5
Romania 71 47 24 2 12 1 12 1 8 4 2 5
Denmark 94 53 41 3 1 2 7 2 4 3 5 3 5 12 6
Sweden 238 150 88 12 12 10 12 4 12 12 4 10 10 7 12 12 4 7 10
Austria 21 21 0 1 1 2 8 6 1 1 1
Croatia 64 26 38 1 5 5 2 5 8
Malta 157 107 50 10 4 7 4 4 5 4 2 6 3 8 6 4 10 7 6 6 10 1
Lithuania 93 16 77 3 6 3 3 1
Russia 217 93 124 7 8 1 3 6 3 7 3 8 4 8 3 7 10 12 3
Albania 96 38 58 2 2 5 7 12 7 3
Norway 210 40 170 1 7 3 6 8 5 3 4 1 2
Netherlands 280 140 140 4 8 12 8 8 7 10 10 8 12 12 1 4 10 6 4 10 4 2
North Macedonia 239 155 84 8 6 10 8 5 10 10 8 12 2 2 10 12 7 4 10 12 7 12
Azerbaijan 224 103 121 5 6 10 7 1 1 6 7 7 8 4 10 6 1 8 3 6 7
Detailed televoting results of semi-final 2[112]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Televote
Armenia
Ireland
Moldova
Switzerland
Latvia
Romania
Denmark
Sweden
Austria
Croatia
Malta
Lithuania
Russia
Albania
Norway
Netherlands
North Macedonia
Azerbaijan
Germany
Italy
United Kingdom
Contestants
Armenia 49 26 23 2 10 5 6
Ireland 16 13 3 3
Moldova 85 58 27 3 12 2 5 5
Switzerland 232 95 137 8 6 6 3 7 6 4 12 8 12 4 4 6 7 8 2 10 12 6 6
Latvia 50 37 13 1 12
Romania 71 47 24 1 12 10 1
Denmark 94 53 41 1 2 2 5 10 2 1 2 3 1 8 4
Sweden 238 150 88 4 5 8 4 1 10 1 4 7 5 2 4 10 10 1 3 5 4
Austria 21 21 0
Croatia 64 26 38 2 5 1 1 8 1 3 3 10 1 3
Malta 157 107 50 7 4 3 2 2 5 2 1 3 1 4 6 2 8
Lithuania 93 16 77 12 5 1 10 4 7 3 1 5 12 2 2 1 12
Russia 217 93 124 12 7 10 3 12 8 3 3 4 3 5 10 2 4 3 7 12 7 7 2
Albania 96 38 58 12 3 2 3 6 2 12 4 2 12
Norway 210 40 170 5 10 4 10 8 5 12 12 10 10 8 8 8 12 12 3 5 10 8 10
Netherlands 280 140 140 10 8 7 6 7 6 8 5 6 7 10 6 7 10 5 8 8 8 3 5
North Macedonia 239 155 84 6 7 4 1 6 5 12 6 2 6 8 1 6 7 6 1
Azerbaijan 224 103 121 3 8 4 6 10 7 8 7 5 4 7 12 7 6 7 5 4 4 7

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of the maximum 12 points awarded by each country's professional jury and televote in the second semi-final. Countries in bold gave the maximum 24 points (12 points apiece from professional jury and televoting) to the specified entrant.

12 points awarded by juries
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
7  Sweden  Armenia,  Austria,  Denmark,  Ireland,  Latvia,  Netherlands,  Norway
4  North Macedonia  Albania,  Croatia,  Germany,  United Kingdom
3  Netherlands  Lithuania,  Malta,   Switzerland
2  Romania  Moldova,  Russia
1  Albania  North Macedonia
 Denmark  Italy
 Moldova  Romania
 Russia  Azerbaijan
  Switzerland  Sweden
12 points awarded by televoting
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
4  Norway  Albania,  Denmark,  Netherlands,  Sweden
3  Albania  Italy,  North Macedonia,   Switzerland
 Lithuania  Ireland,  Norway,  United Kingdom
 Russia  Armenia,  Azerbaijan,  Latvia
  Switzerland  Austria,  Germany,  Malta
1  Azerbaijan  Russia
 Latvia  Lithuania
 Moldova  Romania
 North Macedonia  Croatia
 Romania  Moldova

Final[edit]

  Winner
Split results of the final
Place Combined Jury Televoting
Country Points Country Points Country Points
1  Netherlands 498  North Macedonia 247  Norway 291
2  Italy 472  Sweden 241  Netherlands 261
3  Russia 370  Netherlands 237  Italy 253
4   Switzerland 364  Italy 219  Russia 244
5  Sweden 334  Azerbaijan 202   Switzerland 212
6  Norway 331  Australia 153  Iceland 186
7  North Macedonia 305   Switzerland 152  Australia 131
8  Azerbaijan 302  Czech Republic 150  Azerbaijan 100
9  Australia 284  Russia 126  Sweden 93
10  Iceland 232  Malta 87  San Marino 65
11  Czech Republic 157  Cyprus 77  Slovenia 59
12  Denmark 120  Denmark 69  North Macedonia 58
13  Cyprus 109  France 67  Serbia 54
14  Malta 107  Greece 50  Spain 53
15  Slovenia 105  Slovenia 46  Denmark 51
16  France 105  Iceland 46  Estonia 48
17  Albania 90  Albania 43  Albania 47
18  Serbia 89  Norway 40  France 38
19  San Marino 77  Serbia 35  Israel 35
20  Estonia 76  Estonia 28  Cyprus 32
21  Greece 74  Germany 24  Greece 24
22  Spain 54  Belarus 18  Malta 20
23  Israel 35  San Marino 12  Belarus 13
24  Belarus 31  United Kingdom 8  Czech Republic 7
25  Germany 24  Spain 1  United Kingdom 3
26  United Kingdom 11  Israel 0  Germany 0
Distribution of points to the top 10 countries in the final
  Televoting
  Jury votes
Detailed jury voting results of the final[113]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Jury vote
Portugal
Azerbaijan
Malta
North Macedonia
San Marino
Netherlands
Montenegro
Estonia
Poland
Norway
Spain
Austria
United Kingdom
Italy
Albania
Hungary
Moldova
Ireland
Belarus
Armenia
Romania
Cyprus
Australia
Russia
Germany
Belgium
Sweden
Croatia
Lithuania
Serbia
Iceland
Georgia
Greece
Latvia
Czech Republic
Denmark
France
Finland
Switzerland
Slovenia
Israel
Contestants
Malta 107 87 20 10 5 8 6 4 8 1 12 4 3 6 3 2 5 1 3 1 1 4
Albania 90 43 47 7 2 8 7 8 1 2 2 3 3
Czech Republic 157 150 7 10 4 1 8 12 6 3 1 4 12 8 3 8 5 5 1 7 7 4 6 12 3 3 4 12 1
Germany 24 24 0 2 3 5 8 6
Russia 370 126 244 12 10 6 10 5 10 6 2 4 1 5 3 1 5 6 10 4 3 2 1 10 4 3 3
Denmark 120 69 51 7 3 2 5 4 3 12 6 4 1 1 2 7 7 1 4
San Marino 77 12 65 1 5 6
North Macedonia 305 247 58 5 8 3 1 3 7 8 10 12 12 10 12 10 12 5 10 10 7 7 4 7 10 12 8 1 8 7 10 7 7 12 2
Sweden 334 241 93 2 5 12 12 8 12 6 10 2 6 4 2 12 2 12 1 7 12 2 5 8 8 12 2 10 12 12 10 12 8 7 6
Slovenia 105 46 59 3 4 10 1 4 4 4 10 6
Cyprus 109 77 32 3 6 1 5 1 5 1 5 7 8 8 2 7 6 12
Netherlands 498 237 261 12 7 7 3 7 7 8 8 6 1 3 8 6 6 5 5 6 8 6 12 6 12 7 8 12 6 7 12 8 10 6 12
Greece 74 50 24 6 4 8 4 3 12 10 3
Israel 35 0 35
Norway 331 40 291 4 1 1 7 6 5 4 5 7
United Kingdom 11 8 3 2 2 2 1 1
Iceland 232 46 186 2 6 3 8 2 10 6 4 5
Estonia 76 28 48 5 1 6 5 1 2 8
Belarus 31 18 13 1 1 8 1 7
Azerbaijan 302 202 100 8 8 4 4 5 2 5 7 4 7 7 8 5 6 7 5 10 6 2 12 5 10 3 4 10 8 6 5 4 6 2 10 7
France 105 67 38 3 6 5 2 3 3 4 10 4 8 3 1 1 5 2 2 3 2
Italy 472 219 253 6 5 12 12 12 6 2 3 4 7 5 7 1 7 8 8 12 12 8 12 3 10 3 7 2 8 1 8 5 5 8 10
Serbia 89 35 54 12 4 7 2 3 1 4 2
Switzerland 364 152 212 1 3 2 10 10 6 3 10 5 10 3 10 4 7 4 1 6 7 10 8 5 5 3 6 2 3 5 3
Australia 284 153 131 7 2 10 2 4 12 10 8 6 2 10 4 12 10 4 6 2 7 10 2 4 10 4 5
Spain 54 1 53 1
Detailed televoting results of the final[113]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% televoting
  •   100% jury vote
Total score
Jury score
Televoting score
Televote
Portugal
Azerbaijan
Malta
North Macedonia
San Marino
Netherlands
Montenegro
Estonia
Poland
Norway
Spain
Austria
United Kingdom
Italy
Albania
Hungary
Moldova
Ireland
Belarus
Armenia
Romania
Cyprus
Australia
Russia
Germany
Belgium
Sweden
Croatia
Lithuania
Serbia
Iceland
Georgia
Greece
Latvia
Czech Republic
Denmark
France
Finland
Switzerland
Slovenia
Israel
Contestants
Malta 107 87 20 4 6 6 4
Albania 90 43 47 12 7 12 1 5 10
Czech Republic 157 150 7 1 2 2 2
Germany 24 24 0
Russia 370 126 244 10 12 4 12 10 12 3 1 2 5 8 12 7 12 5 12 12 7 10 8 1 12 8 8 8 12 12 3 4 12
Denmark 120 69 51 1 5 6 5 6 4 4 7 4 4 1 3 1
San Marino 77 12 65 10 8 8 10 6 8 1 2 1 1 10
North Macedonia 305 247 58 3 5 1 6 6 2 7 12 2 2 12
Sweden 334 241 93 6 8 3 12 6 5 2 2 8 1 2 3 8 6 10 7 4
Slovenia 105 46 59 2 4 7 4 2 3 5 6 3 10 10 2 1
Cyprus 109 77 32 7 1 12 12
Netherlands 498 237 261 8 7 10 7 6 1 8 10 8 8 7 4 5 7 8 6 8 10 10 12 6 6 5 7 12 6 4 7 3 5 5 6 5 4 7 5 5 6 5 2
Greece 74 50 24 10 2 12
Israel 35 0 35 1 7 3 5 4 3 12
Norway 331 40 291 6 1 7 5 3 12 10 8 7 8 12 10 5 10 3 12 8 5 4 1 12 10 12 7 12 5 8 4 12 8 10 12 8 10 8 6 10
United Kingdom 11 8 3 3
Iceland 232 46 186 3 1 2 7 2 5 12 10 3 6 8 7 12 1 6 7 3 5 10 7 2 3 8 3 6 5 3 2 7 6 4 1 12 7
Estonia 76 28 48 2 1 10 4 3 10 1 8 8 1
Belarus 31 18 13 5 8
Azerbaijan 302 202 100 2 1 4 4 3 1 2 3 1 1 3 1 3 2 10 6 6 1 12 3 5 7 4 7 5 3
France 105 67 38 2 4 2 1 4 1 3 3 10 1 3 4
Italy 472 219 253 7 6 12 3 8 10 5 7 7 12 10 8 4 5 4 3 7 8 8 5 1 6 8 4 12 10 7 6 1 10 3 2 3 10 3 12 8 8
Serbia 89 35 54 10 12 4 3 8 7 10
Switzerland 364 152 212 5 8 8 4 5 6 4 5 6 10 12 7 3 4 5 4 7 4 8 10 7 7 2 10 5 1 6 2 6 7 7 1 5 6 2 2 4 7
Australia 284 153 131 4 3 2 2 6 4 5 3 10 6 1 10 2 1 2 2 4 5 4 5 1 10 3 6 8 2 6 6 2 6
Spain 54 1 53 12 2 3 2 4 6 2 4 1 7 5 5

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of the maximum 12 points awarded by each country's professional jury and televote in the final. Countries in bold gave the maximum 24 points (12 points apiece from professional jury and televoting) to the specified entrant.

12 points awarded by juries
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
10  Sweden  Armenia,  Australia,  Czech Republic,  Denmark,  Estonia,  Finland,  Iceland,  Ireland,  Netherlands,  Spain
6  Italy  Belgium,  Croatia,  Germany,  Malta,  North Macedonia,  San Marino
 Netherlands  France,  Israel,  Latvia,  Lithuania,  Portugal,  Sweden
 North Macedonia  Albania,  Austria,  Moldova,  Serbia,   Switzerland,  United Kingdom
4  Czech Republic  Georgia,  Hungary,  Norway,  Slovenia
2  Australia  Poland,  Romania
1  Azerbaijan  Russia
 Cyprus  Greece
 Denmark  Italy
 Greece  Cyprus
 Malta  Belarus
 Russia  Azerbaijan
 Serbia  Montenegro
12 points awarded by televoting
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
11  Russia  Albania,  Armenia,  Azerbaijan,  Belarus,  Czech Republic,  Estonia,  Israel,  Latvia,  Lithuania,  Moldova,  San Marino
8  Norway  Australia,  Denmark,  Germany,  Iceland,  Ireland,  Netherlands,  Sweden,  United Kingdom
4  Italy  Croatia,  Malta,  Spain,   Switzerland
3  Iceland  Finland,  Hungary,  Poland
2  Albania  Italy,  North Macedonia
 Cyprus  Georgia,  Greece
 Netherlands  Belgium,  Romania
 North Macedonia  Serbia,  Slovenia
1  Azerbaijan  Russia
 Greece  Cyprus
 Israel  France
 Serbia  Montenegro
 Spain  Portugal
 Sweden  Norway
  Switzerland  Austria

Broadcasts[edit]

Countries may add commentary from commentators working on-location or remotely at the broadcaster. Commentators can add insight to the participating entries and the provision of voting information.

The European Broadcasting Union provided international live streams of both semi-finals and the final through their official YouTube channel with no commentary. The live streams were geo-blocked to viewers in Bolivia, Canada, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Uruguay, United States and Venezuela due to rights limitations. After the live broadcasts, all three shows were made available for every country listed above, except the United States and Canada.[114][115][116]

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Show(s) Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Albania All shows RTSH, RTSH Muzikë, Radio Tirana Andri Xhahu [117]
 Armenia All shows Armenia 1, Public Radio of Armenia Aram Mp3 and Avet Barseghyan [118]
 Australia All shows SBS Myf Warhurst and Joel Creasey [119]
 Austria All shows ORF 1 Andi Knoll [120]
 Azerbaijan All shows İTV Murad Arif [121]
 Belarus All shows Belarus-1, Belarus 24 Evgeny Perlin [122]
 Belgium All shows La Une Jean-Louis Lahaye [fr] and Maureen Louys [123]
SF1/Final één Peter Van de Veire [124][125][126]
SF2 Ketnet
 Croatia All shows HRT 1, HR 2 Duško Ćurlić [127][128][129]
 Cyprus All shows CyBC Evridiki and Tasos Tryfonos [el] [130]
 Czech Republic Semi-finals ČT2 Libor Bouček [cs] [131]
Final ČT1
 Denmark All shows DR1 Ole Tøpholm [132]
 Estonia All shows ETV Marko Reikop [133]
ETV+ Aleksandr Hobotov and Julia Kalenda [134]
 Finland All shows Yle TV2
[135]
Semi-finals Yle Radio Suomi Sanna Pirkkalainen and Toni Laaksonen [fi]
Final Sanna Pirkkalainen and Sami Sykkö [fi]
 France Semi-finals France 4 André Manoukian and Sandy Heribert [136][137]
Final France 2 Stéphane Bern and André Manoukian
 Georgia Semi-finals 1TV Helen Kalandadze and Gaga Abashidze [138][139]
Final Helen Kalandadze, Gaga Abashidze and Nodiko Tatishvili
 Germany Semi-finals One Peter Urban [140][141][142][143]
Final One, Das Erste, Deutsche Welle
 Greece All shows ERT2, ERT Sports HD Giorgos Kapoutzidis and Maria Kozakou [144][145][146][147]
SF1/Final Voice of Greece
 Hungary All shows Duna Krisztina Rátonyi and Freddie [148]
 Iceland All shows RÚV Gísli Marteinn Baldursson [149]
Semi-finals RÚV 2 [is] Alex Elliott [150][151]
Final RÚV.is
 Ireland Semi-finals RTÉ2 Marty Whelan [152][153]
Final RTÉ One
SF2 RTÉ Radio 1 Neil Doherty and Zbyszek Zalinski
Final RTÉ 2fm
 Israel All shows Kan 11, Kan 88 Sharon Taicher [he] and Eran Zarachowicz [he] [154]
 Italy Semi-finals Rai 4, Rai Radio 2 Federico Russo and Ema Stokholma [it] [155][156][157][158]
Final Rai 1 Federico Russo and Flavio Insinna
Rai Radio 2 Ema Stokholma and Gino Castaldo [it]
 Latvia All shows LTV Toms Grēviņš [lv] and Ketija Šēnberga [159]
 Lithuania All shows LRT televizija, LRT Radijas Darius Užkuraitis [lt] and Gerūta Griniūtė [160]
 Malta SF2/Final PBS Unknown [161][162][163]
 Moldova All shows Moldova 1 [161][162][163]
 Montenegro All shows TVCG 1, TVCG 2, TVCG SAT Dražen Bauković and Tijana Mišković [164][165][166][167]
 Netherlands All shows NPO 1 Jan Smit and Cornald Maas [168]
Final NPO Radio 2 Wouter van der Goes and Frank van 't Hof [nl] [169]
 North Macedonia All shows MRT 1 Toni Cifrovski [170]
 Norway All shows NRK1 Olav Viksmo-Slettan [171]
Final NRK3 Ronny Brede Aase [no], Silje Nordnes [no] and Markus Neby [no] [172]
NRK P1 Ole-Christian Øen [173]
 Poland All shows TVP1, TVP Polonia Artur Orzech [174]
 Portugal All shows RTP1, RTP Internacional José Carlos Malato and Nuno Galopim [175]
 Romania All shows TVR 1, TVR HD, TVRi Liana Stanciu and Bogdan Stănescu [176]
 Russia All shows Russia-1, Russia HD Dmitry Guberniev and Olga Shelest [ru] [177]
 San Marino All shows San Marino RTV, Radio San Marino Lia Fiorio and Gigi Restivo [178]
 Serbia SF1/Final RTS1, RTS HD, RTS Svet Duška Vučinić [179][180][181]
SF2 Tamara Petković and Katarina Epštajn
Final Radio Belgrade 1 Nikoleta Dojčinović and Katarina Epštajn
 Slovenia Semi-finals TV SLO 2 Andrej Hofer [sl] [182][183]
Final TV SLO 1
 Spain Semi-finals La 2 Tony Aguilar and Julia Varela [184][185]
Final La 1
Radio Nacional, Radio 5, Radio Exterior Daniel Galindo
 Sweden All shows SVT1 Charlotte Perrelli and Edward af Sillén [186]
SR P4 Carolina Norén and Björn Kjellman
  Switzerland Semi-finals SRF zwei Sven Epiney [187]
Final SRF 1
Semi-finals RTS Deux Jean-Marc Richard and Nicolas Tanner [188]
Final RTS Un Jean-Marc Richard, Nicolas Tanner and Bastian Baker
SF2 RSI La 2 Clarissa Tami [it] and Sebalter [189]
Final RSI La 1
 United Kingdom Semi-finals BBC Four Scott Mills and Rylan Clark-Neal [190]
Final BBC One Graham Norton
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce [191]
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country/Territory Show(s) Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Canada All shows Omni Television No commentary [d]
 Kazakhstan All shows Khabar TV Kaldybek Zhaysanbay and Mahabbat Esen [197]
 Kosovo All shows RTK Alma Bektashi [sq] and Agron Krasniqi [198]
 Slovakia Final Rádio FM Daniel Baláž [sk], Pavol Hubinák and Juraj Malíček [sk] [199][200]
 Ukraine All shows UA:First Timur Miroshnychenko [201]
STB Serhiy Prytula
 United States Final WJFD-FM Ewan Spence, Samantha Ross and Bernardo Pereira [202]
All shows Netflix No commentary [e]

Incidents[edit]

Religious requests[edit]

On 14 May 2018, Yaakov Litzman, leader of the ultra-Orthodox party United Torah Judaism and Israel's former Minister of Health, drafted a letter to the Ministers of Tourism, Communications, and Culture and Sports, in which he requested the event not violate religious laws: "In the name of hundreds of thousands of Jewish citizens from all the populations and communities for whom Shabbat observance is close to their hearts, I appeal to you, already at this early stage, before production and all the other details of the event has begun, to be strict [in ensuring] that this matter does not harm the holiness of Shabbat and to work in every way to prevent the desecration of Shabbat, God forbid, as the law and the status quo requires".[208] According to Jewish religious law, Shabbat is observed from just before sunset on Friday evening until Saturday night. The Saturday evening broadcast of the show, which were to start at 22:00 local time, would not conflict with this. However, the Friday evening jury show and Saturday afternoon rehearsals would. Similar protests arose in the lead-up to the 1999 Israeli-held contest, but then there were fewer competing delegations, which allowed for certain adjustments to be made to accommodate the issue. The chairman of the Eurovision Song Contest Reference Group (the contest's executive board), Frank-Dieter Freiling, noted that he was well aware of the tension, and had plans to address it in his communications with host broadcaster Kan.[209] Shalva Band, who performed as the interval act during the second semi-final, withdrew from Israel's national final citing similar concerns on possibly performing during Shabbat in the rehearsals for the final, should they have won.[210]

Calls for boycott[edit]

A mural in Girona promoting a boycott of the 2019 contest

The possibility of Jerusalem being the venue for an Israeli-hosted contest led many proponents of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement to call on their national broadcasters to boycott the competition because of Israel's policies towards Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza.[211][212][213] This included members of the Australian Greens party,[214] Sinn Féin,[215] Sweden's Left Party[216] and many entertainers including 1994 contest winner Charlie McGettigan.[217] The Icelandic broadcaster RÚV met to discuss a boycott in response to a petition of 23,000 signatures,[218] but ultimately neither RÚV nor any other broadcaster withdrew from the contest in response to boycott calls. In the event, viewing figures for the contest dropped to the joint lowest level since 2013.[219]

Several national selections were disrupted by BDS supporters calling for a boycott in the lead-up to the contest. This included the second semi-final of France's Destination Eurovision, which was invaded by stage intruders who held up signs advocating a boycott;[220] and selection events in Spain,[221] Germany, Denmark[222] and Norway[223] were all targeted by protesters outside the venues calling for a boycott.[224] The EBU later sent a special letter to all participating broadcasters advising precautions they could take to prevent similar disruptions.[225] An opinion piece in Sweden's largest newspaper Aftonbladet, calling for a boycott of the contest and other cultural exchanges with Israel, was signed by 171 Swedish professionals in the cultural sector.[226]

In March 2019, LGBT activist groups Al Qaws and Pinkwatching Israel called for a boycott of the contest in opposition to Israeli "pinkwashing".[227] In late April, over 100 celebrities including Stephen Fry and Sharon Osbourne signed a joint statement against boycotting Eurovision in Israel, asserting that any cultural boycott would be antithetical to advancing peace in the region.[228]

Late Ukrainian withdrawal[edit]

During the final of the Ukrainian national selection on 23 February 2019, it was announced that the Public Broadcasting Company of Ukraine (UA:PBC) had reserved the right to change the decision made by the jury and the Ukrainian public. Following Maruv's win, it was reported the broadcaster had sent a contract to her management, requiring her to cancel all upcoming appearances and performances in Russia to represent Ukraine. She was also given 48 hours to sign the contract or be replaced.[229]

On 24 February 2019, Maruv revealed the contract sent to her by UA:PBC had also banned her from improvising on stage and communicating with any journalist without the permission of the broadcaster, and required her to fully comply with any requests from the broadcaster. Later, the broadcaster published a statement explaining every entry of the contract.[230] If she failed to follow any of these clauses, she would be fined 2 million (~€65,500). Maruv also said the broadcaster would not give her any financial compensation for the competition and would not pay for her trip to Tel Aviv.[231]

On 25 February 2019, both Maruv and UA:PBC confirmed she would not represent Ukraine in the contest due to disputes over the contract, and that another act would be chosen.[232] National final runner-up Freedom Jazz announced on 26 February they had also rejected the broadcaster's offer to represent Ukraine as did third-place finisher Kazka the following day.[233][234] The incident garnered media coverage from major international outlets, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Billboard, The Telegraph, The Independent, SBS News, The Irish Independent, Le Figaro, Cosmopolitan, and ABC.[235] On 27 February, UA:PBC announced its withdrawal from the contest.[29]

Ticket sales controversy[edit]

The ticket prices for the year's event sparked criticism, both in Israel and abroad,[236] with The Times of Israel calling them "likely the most expensive ever for Eurovision".[237] Explanations for the high prices included the high cost of living in Israel and the fact that the Israeli government was not subsidising the Eurovision production.[238][239] Although the venue could hold up to 10,000 people, only 7,300 seats were available because of the size of the stage, the technical equipment and the security features. Of those 7,300 seats, 3,000 had been reserved for the EBU, leaving only 4,300 for fans so that demand exceeded supply.[240]

On 3 March 2019, ticket sales were frozen due to irregularities noticed by the oversight committee of Kan. Israeli media reported tickets being illegally resold for more than twice their original price. Public security minister Gilad Erdan ordered an investigation into the situation.[241] Ticket sales resumed on 14 March; according to Kan, 220 improperly-purchased tickets to the final live show were revoked and sold again in the second round of sales.[242]

Technical issues[edit]

Cyber attack during semi-final 1[edit]

Kan suffered a cyber attack by a group of hackers that affected the broadcaster's accessibility livestreams of the first semi-final.[243] The hackers were able to briefly show anti-Israeli statements on the streams such as "Israel is not safe, you will see" and "Risk of missile attack, please take shelter".[244] The incident was investigated by both the broadcaster and the EBU. Kan released a statement regarding the incident saying: "The problem was fixed quickly, and it seems that during the first semi-finals a site was hacked here for a few minutes, and we believe that the messages were not seen by many people."[245]

Semi-final 1 technical issues[edit]

Multiple broadcasters around Europe reported various issues during the live broadcast of the first semi-final.[246] Viewers reported a loss of commentary from Tel Aviv in the Netherlands and North Macedonia.[246] The Polish public broadcaster, TVP, had to replace their regular commentator Artur Orzech who was in Tel Aviv with another person who was based in Warsaw because viewers were unable to hear Orzech.[246] Germany and the United Kingdom lost a portion of the show. On BBC Four, which broadcast the semi-finals in the UK, the programme cut out as the recap of the qualifiers of the first semi-final began to play, and was replaced by the message "We are sorry for the break in this programme and are trying to correct the fault"[247] while the French broadcaster France Télévisions experienced audio issues during the Portuguese and Belgian performances.[246] Similar technical issues happened during the 2011 contest.

Keiino's jury final performance[edit]

During Norway's jury final performance, two technical issues occurred in a short time. The screen turned black while Keiino performed their song "Spirit in the Sky". When the picture returned the camera operator was seen in the picture. NRK complained to the EBU and requested a new run through, but the EBU rejected the complaints.[248][249][250]

Jury vote issues[edit]

Following the reveal of the detailed jury voting, it emerged that three jurors appeared to have voted backwards in their semi-finals. In the first semi-final, Czech juror Jitka Zelenková ranked Portugal as her favourite entry, Slovenia as her least-favourite entry, and ranked Estonia as fourteenth on her list; this was directly opposite to the other Czech jurors, who all ranked Slovenia first and two who ranked Portugal last. In the final, Zelenková's rankings changed significantly; she listed Estonia as her fourth favourite and Slovenia as her sixth favourite. Neither Zelenková, the Czech broadcaster Česká televize (ČT) nor the EBU had confirmed that her semi-final votes were reversed, but if this were corrected, Poland would have qualified to the final instead of Belarus.[251]

Swedish juror Lina Hedlund also appeared to have voted backwards in the second semi-final. She ranked the Netherlands and Switzerland as her favourite entries in the final, but ranked them as her two least-favourite entries in the semi-final. Additionally, Hedlund ranked Austria her favourite entry in the semi-final, which led Austria to receive eight points from Sweden. Neither Hedlund, the Swedish broadcaster Sveriges Television (SVT) nor the EBU had commented on the incident.[252][253][254]

The second semi-final also seemed to have had Russian juror Igor Gulyaev casting his votes in reverse order. In the semi-final, Gulyaev ranked Denmark first and Azerbaijan last, although he reversed these placements in the final. He also ranked Albania as his second least favourite entry in the semi-final, but conversely as his second favourite in the final. If his and Hedlund's votes were corrected, it would have had no impact on the result other than minor differences in the number of points received by each country.[255][256]

This was the second year in which a juror accidentally submitted their votes backwards. In the 2016 contest, Danish juror Hilda Heick ranked the entries backwards, resulting in Denmark awarding 12 points to Ukraine instead of Australia.[252]

Political demonstrations during the final[edit]

The organisation of the 2019 contest in Israel faced protests due to the Israeli–Palestinian conflict, and not exclusively outside the venue.

During Madonna's interval performance in the final, the singer directed a monologue (part of her song "Dark Ballet") to backup dancers wearing gas masks between the two songs, alluding to the "[storm] inside of us", saying "they think we are not aware of their crimes. We know, but we're just not ready to act". This was interpreted as a reference to the conflict. During "Future", two dancers—one wearing an Israeli, the other a Palestinian flag on the back of their costumes—were seen holding each other while guest vocalist Quavo sang the lyrics: "Not everyone is coming to the future, not everyone is learning from the past". Madonna later stated that the use of Israeli and Palestinian flags was not a pro-Palestine demonstration, but a call for unity and peace.[257]

While receiving their points from the televotes, members of the Icelandic entry Hatari were seen showing banners that included the Palestinian flag.[258][259][260] There had previously been concerns that the self-described anti-capitalist group would use their performance to protest the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territory, and the band had previously received warnings from the EBU about statements they had made prior to the contest.[261][262] Following the flag incident, the EBU stated that "the consequences of this action [would] be discussed by the Reference Group after the Contest".[263] Hatari subsequently announced a collaboration with Palestinian singer Bashar Murad for their next single.[264] The Icelandic broadcaster RÚV was eventually handed a 5,000-fine for the incident.[265] The incident was retained on the official replay of the final on YouTube, but was edited out on the DVD and Netflix releases.[266][267]

Other awards[edit]

In addition to the main winner's trophy, the Marcel Bezençon Awards and the Barbara Dex Award were contested during the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest. The OGAE, "General Organisation of Eurovision Fans" voting poll also took place before the contest.

Marcel Bezençon Awards[edit]

The Marcel Bezençon Awards, organised since 2002 by Sweden's then-Head of Delegation and 1992 representative Christer Björkman, and 1984 winner Richard Herrey, honours songs in the contest's final.[268] The awards are divided into three categories: Artistic Award, Composers Award, and Press Award.[269] The winners were revealed shortly before the Eurovision final on 18 May.

Category Country Song Performer(s) Songwriter(s)
Artistic Award  Australia "Zero Gravity" Kate Miller-Heidke
Composers Award  Italy "Soldi" Mahmood
Press Award  Netherlands "Arcade" Duncan Laurence

OGAE[edit]

OGAE, an organisation of over forty Eurovision Song Contest fan clubs across Europe and beyond, conducts an annual voting poll first held in 2002 as the Marcel Bezençon Fan Award. After all votes were cast, the top-ranked entry in the 2019 poll was Italy's "Soldi" performed by Mahmood; the top five results are shown below.[270][271][272]

Country Performer(s) Song OGAE result
 Italy Mahmood "Soldi" 411
  Switzerland Luca Hänni "She Got Me" 406
 Netherlands Duncan Laurence "Arcade" 401
 Norway Keiino "Spirit in the Sky" 224
 Cyprus Tamta "Replay" 218

Barbara Dex Award[edit]

The Barbara Dex Award is a humorous fan award given each year to the artist who wore the most notable outfit. First awarded in 1997, the award originally highlighted the worst-dressed artists in the competition, until this criterion was changed in 2019. Named after Belgium's representative who came last in the 1993 contest, wearing her self-designed dress, the award was handed by the fansite House of Eurovision from 1997 to 2016 and is being carried out by the fansite Songfestival.be since 2017.

Place Country Performer(s)
1  Portugal Conan Osíris
2  Cyprus Tamta
3  Belarus Zena
4  Belgium Eliot
5  North Macedonia Tamara Todevska

Official album[edit]

Cover art of the official album

Eurovision Song Contest: Tel Aviv 2019 is the official compilation album of the contest, put together by the European Broadcasting Union and released by Universal Music Group digitally on 12 April 2019 and physically on 26 April 2019.[273][274] The album features all 41 entries including the semi-finalists that failed to qualify for the final.

Charts[edit]

Chart (2019) Peak
position
Australian Albums (ARIA)[275] 13
German Compilation Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[276] 2
Irish Compilation Albums (IRMA)[277] 2
UK Compilation Albums (OCC)[278] 3

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]