Eurovision Song Contest 2021

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Eurovision Song Contest 2021
Open Up
Eurovision Song Contest 2021 logo.svg
Dates
Semi-final 118 May 2021
Semi-final 220 May 2021
Final22 May 2021
Host
VenueRotterdam Ahoy
Rotterdam, Netherlands
Presenter(s)
Directed by
  • Marnix Kaart
  • Marc Pos
  • Daniel Jelinek
Executive supervisorMartin Österdahl
Executive producer
  • Sietse Bakker
  • Astrid Dutrénit
Host broadcaster
Opening act
Interval act
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/rotterdam-2021 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries39
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries Bulgaria
 Ukraine
Non-returning countries Armenia
 Belarus
 Hungary
 Montenegro
  • Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021San Marino in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021France in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Latvia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Lithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestAustria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Hungary in the Eurovision Song ContestCroatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song ContestMontenegro in the Eurovision Song ContestSerbia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Albania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021North Macedonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Bulgaria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Romania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Moldova in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Ukraine in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Belarus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Australia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Georgia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Azerbaijan in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Turkey in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Armenia in the Eurovision Song ContestMorocco in the Eurovision Song ContestLiechtenstein in the Eurovision Song ContestAndorra in the Eurovision Song ContestMonaco in the Eurovision Song ContestPoland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Czech Republic in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestLebanon in the Eurovision Song ContestTunisia in the Eurovision Song ContestA coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 2021
Vote
Voting systemEach country awards two sets of 12, 10, 8–1 points to 10 songs: the first–from a professional jury, the second–from viewers.
2019 ← 2020 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2022

The Eurovision Song Contest 2021 is set to be the 65th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. The contest will be held in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, following the country's victory at the 2019 contest with the song "Arcade" by Duncan Laurence. The Netherlands was due to host the 2020 contest, before it was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It will be the fifth time that the Netherlands hosts the contest, having previously done so in 1958, 1970, 1976 and 1980.

Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcasters Nederlandse Publieke Omroep (NPO), Nederlandse Omroep Stichting (NOS) and AVROTROS, the contest will be held at Rotterdam Ahoy and will consist of two semi-finals on 18 and 20 May, and the final on 22 May 2021. The EBU discussed carryovers between the 2020 and 2021 contests, and many participating countries allocated the same artists who were due to represent them in 2020. The three live shows will be hosted by Chantal Janzen, Edsilia Rombley, Jan Smit and Nikkie de Jager.

Thirty-nine countries will participate in the contest. Bulgaria and Ukraine will return after their absences from the 2019 contest, while Hungary and Montenegro will not return after their 2019 participation. Armenia and Belarus had originally planned to participate, but Armenia later withdrew due to social and political crises following the 2020 Nagorno-Karabakh war and Belarus was disqualified after their intended entry was found to be in violation of the contest's rules.

Location[edit]

Rotterdam Ahoy, the venue of the Eurovision Song Contest 2021.

The 2021 contest will be held at Rotterdam Ahoy in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, following the country's victory at the 2019 edition with the song "Arcade", performed by Duncan Laurence. It will be the fifth time that the Netherlands hosts the contest, having previously done so in 1958, 1970, 1976 and 1980. Rotterdam Ahoy had previously hosted the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2007, and was set to host the 2020 contest before its cancellation.

Selection of the host city[edit]

By Eurovision tradition, the Netherlands received the right to host the Eurovision Song Contest after the country won the competition in 2019.[1] The Dutch host broadcasters NPO, NOS and AVROTROS launched the bidding process in the same month, on 29 May,[2] in which five cities—Arnhem, 's-Hertogenbosch, Maastricht, Rotterdam, and Utrecht—submitted their bid books during a ceremonial event held in Hilversum on 10 July 2019.[3] On 16 July, Maastricht and Rotterdam were shortlisted,[4] and after the NPO visited both cities,[5] on 30 August 2019, Rotterdam was announced as the host city of the Eurovision Song Contest 2020.[6]

Following the cancellation of the 2020 contest, the EBU began talks with broadcasters NPO, NOS and AVROTROS, as well as the city of Rotterdam, on the possibility of staging the 2021 contest in the city.[7] On 23 April 2020, the municipal council of Rotterdam approved an increased budget after Dutch media reported that the city would require an additional €6.7 million to host the contest.[8][9] The decision was imminent as it was required that the EBU be informed by late April if Rotterdam was willing to host the contest. If Rotterdam declined to host the event, NPO, NOS and AVROTROS had until mid-May 2020 to find an alternative.[10]

During the broadcast of Eurovision: Europe Shine a Light, which aired on 16 May 2020, Rotterdam was confirmed as the host city of the 2021 contest.[11]

Other sites[edit]

Location of host venue (red) and other contest-related sites and events (blue)

The "Turquoise Carpet" and Opening Ceremony events, where the contestants and their delegations are presented before the accredited press and fans, will take place at the Rotterdam Cruise Terminal on 16 May 2021.[12][13]

Production[edit]

The Eurovision Song Contest 2021 will be a co-production between three related Dutch television organisations — Nederlandse Publieke Omroep (NPO), Nederlandse Omroep Stichting (NOS) and AVROTROS — of which each assumed a different role.[14] Sietse Bakker and Astrid Dutrénit will serve as executive producers, while Emilie Sickinghe and Jessica Stam will serve as deputy executive producers.[15]

In January 2020, the EBU announced that Martin Österdahl would become the executive supervisor for the Eurovision Song Contest after the 2020 edition, succeeding Jon Ola Sand.[16] Before his appointment, Österdahl had been an executive producer for the 2013 and 2016 editions, and had been a member of the Eurovision Song Contest reference group between 2012 and 2018.[17]

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic[edit]

On 7 May 2020, Dutch authorities prohibited all mass gatherings in the country until a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available.[18] The host broadcasters stated that they were assessing the decision and how it would impact the event.[19]

On 18 September 2020, the EBU released a summary of contingency scenarios for the contest, including:[20][21]

In February 2021, the EBU and the host broadcasters stated that it had ruled out hosting the contest as normal (Scenario A). Scenario C was also modified – all acts would perform remotely like in scenario D.[22] A health and safety protocol for the contest was published on 2 March 2021, with the EBU affirming that the contest will be held under scenario B, while reiterating that downscaling options remain on the table should circumstances change.[23] On 30 April 2021, the EBU confirmed scenario B for the contest.[24]

Overview of the hosting scenarios (as of 3 February 2021)[22]
Contest aspect Scenario A
(Normal)
Scenario B
(1.5 meter) †
Scenario C
(Travel restrictive)
Scenario D
(Lockdown)
Shows from Ahoy Yes Yes Yes Yes
Participants in Rotterdam All All/most None None
Audience in the arena 100% 0-80% 0-80% None
Side events in Rotterdam Yes Adapted Reduced None
Press Centre 1,500 on site 500 on site
1,000 virtual
1,500 virtual 1,500 virtual

On 1 April 2021, it was announced that an audience of 3,500 people will be allowed at each of the nine shows, including the three live shows and six rehearsals; the Dutch cabinet later gave its approval on 29 April. All audience members must have tested negative for COVID-19.[25][26][27]

Due to pandemic precautions, the "Turquoise Carpet" and Opening Ceremony events will be the only in-person side events to take place in 2021 – the Eurovision Village will be held in an online-only form, while the EuroClub and EuroCafé will not take place.[28][29][30]

Format[edit]

Visual design[edit]

On 18 September 2020, along with possible scenarios, the EBU confirmed that the planned visual design and slogan for 2020, "Open Up", will be used for the 2021 contest as well.[20] The revamped official logo and branding was unveiled on 4 December 2020. Designed by Clever°Franke, it is "an abstract presentation inspired by the map of world and visually connects the location of the capitals of the [then] 41 participating countries with Rotterdam as Europe's beating heart".[31][32] The revamped visual identity, designed by MediaMonks and NEP, was built around patterns and 'tracks' that symbolises the Netherlands and "opening up".[33]

Presenters[edit]

Chantal Janzen, Jan Smit and Edsilia Rombley, three of the four presenters of the 2021 contest

On 18 September 2020, along with possible scenarios, the EBU confirmed that the 2020 planned presenters will be appointed as the presenters for the 2021 contest as well: actress and television host Chantal Janzen, singer and commentator for the contest Jan Smit, singer Edsilia Rombley, who represented the Netherlands in the 1998 and 2007 contests, and beauty vlogger Nikkie de Jager (NikkieTutorials).[20][34][35] In addition, De Jager and Krista Siegfrids (Finland's representative in the 2013 contest) will be the presenters of the contest's online content, including two behind-the-scenes YouTube series to be recorded with the participating artists.[36][37] Koos van Plateringen, Hila Noorzai and Samya Hafsaoui will host the contest's press conferences.[38]

Stage design[edit]

During the announcement of the dates of the 2021 contest, Sietse Bakker, executive producer of the 2021 contest, stated that the planned 2020 stage design will also be used in the 2021 contest.[39] The design is inspired by the slogan "Open Up" and the typical Dutch flat landscape. The Eurovision stage was designed by German stage designer Florian Wieder, who also designed the stages for the contests in 2011–12, 2015, and 2017–19.[40][41] Its features include a revolvable primary LED screen that is 52 meters wide and 12 meters high, and a retractable semi-transparent LED screen which can be used as a backdrop for the secondary stage.[42][43][44] The stage design will be complemented by augmented reality effects.[45] Unlike the 2019 contest, the green room was placed in the main performance venue, and will encompass the entire floor space previously reserved for the standing audience, so as to facilitate social distancing.[46]

Entries[edit]

On 18 June 2020, the EBU announced that, for this year, delegations will have the option to use pre-recorded backing vocals. Each delegation can still choose to use backing singers, whether on or off stage, or a combination of live and recorded backing vocals. All lead vocals performing the melody of the song, including an eventual use of a so-called lead dub, must still be live on or off stage in the arena, according to the rules.[47][48]

On 18 November 2020, the EBU revealed that, as a measure to guarantee that all participants can take part in the contest, every national broadcaster will create a 'live-on-tape' back-up recording prior to the contest which can be used if a participant cannot travel to Rotterdam, or subjected to quarantine on arrival. The recordings will take place in a studio setting, in real-time (as it would be at the contest) without any edits to the vocals or any part of the performance itself after the recording. A set of production guidelines was also revealed to ensure fairness and the integrity of the recordings.[49]

Other rules for the entries will stay the same in the 2021 contest. This includes that the maximum length for a song is three minutes, that there can be at most six performers on stage, and that the compositions (lyrics and music) must not have been commercially released before 1 September of the year before.[50] Following the cancellation of the 2020 contest, the EBU explored the option of allowing the songs selected for the 2020 contest to compete in the 2021 contest, which needed to be discussed with the Eurovision Song Contest reference group and the national broadcasters.[7] Victoria, Bulgaria's representative for 2020 and 2021, publicly expressed her support for such a move.[51] However, on 20 March 2020, the reference group decided that, in accordance with the rules of the Eurovision Song Contest, the 2020 songs would not be eligible to compete in the 2021 contest.[52]

Semi-final allocation draw[edit]

On 17 November 2020, the EBU confirmed that the semi-final allocation draw for the 2021 contest would not be held. Instead, the semi-finals will feature the same line-up of countries as determined by the draw for the 2020 contest's semi-finals, which was held on 28 January 2020 at Rotterdam's City Hall and hosted by contest presenters Chantal Janzen, Jan Smit and Edsilia Rombley. The draw also determined which semi-final each of the six automatic qualifiers – the Big Five plus the Netherlands – would have to vote in. The EBU also decided to maintain the Netherlands' grand final running order position – 23.[53]

The pots used initially for the 2020 contest featured as follows:

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4 Pot 5

Postcards[edit]

The "postcards" are short videos shown on television whilst the stage is being prepared for the next contestant to perform their entry, and usually lasts about up to 45 seconds.[56] Filmed between March and April, and directed by Martijn Nieman, the 2021 postcards are based on the "Open Up" theme of the contest. In a departure from the initial concept created for the 2020 contest's postcards owing to travel restriction concerns, the postcards involved the acts being presented through footage shot in their country of origin, inserted via chroma keying on the framework of a decorated 'tiny house' set-up in various locations around the Netherlands.[57][58] So far, the following three locations have been revealed:

Opening and interval acts[edit]

On 4 May 2021, the EBU released information about the opening and interval acts.[61]

The first semi-final will be opened by Duncan Laurence, performing "Feel Something",[62] and will also feature singer Davina Michelle and actress Thekla Reuten in an interval act titled "The Power of Water", centering on the Netherlands' history of water management.[63][64]

The second semi-final will be opened by breakdancer Redouan Ait Chitt (Redo) and singer-songwriter Eefje de Visser,[65][66] with ballet dancer Ahmad Joudeh and BMX-er Dez Maarsen performing during the interval;[67] the acts are titled "Forward Unlimited" and "Close Encounter of a Special Kind" respectively.

The final will be opened with the traditional flag parade, introducing all twenty-six finalists, accompanied by music produced by 16-year-old DJ Pieter Gabriel.[68] During the interval, DJ Afrojack, singers Glennis Grace (who represented the Netherlands in the 2005 contest) and Wulf will perform "Music Binds Us" – a two-part specially commissioned piece – together with a symphony orchestra composed of young musicians from across the Netherlands, specifically formed for this occasion;[69][70] the piece will also include Afrojack's latest single "Hero".[71][72] Later, in the "Rock the Roof" interval act, six former Eurovision winners — Lenny Kuhr (1969), Teach-In with Getty Kaspers (1975), Sandra Kim (1986), Helena Paparizou (2005), Lordi (2006) and Måns Zelmerlöw (2015) — will perform their winning songs atop several venues in Rotterdam.[73] Duncan Laurence will then perform his new unreleased music, concluding with his winning song "Arcade".[74][75] During the final seconds of voting, a dance sketch titled "The Human Countdown" will be performed.

Participating countries[edit]

  Participating countries in the first semi-final
  Pre-qualified for the final but also voting in the first semi-final
  Participating countries in the second semi-final
  Pre-qualified for the final but also voting in the second semi-final

The EBU initially announced on 26 October 2020 that 41 countries would participate in the contest, featuring the same line-up of countries that were set to participate in the cancelled 2020 edition. Bulgaria and Ukraine will mark their return to the contest after their absences from the 2019 contest, while Hungary and Montenegro were confirmed as non-returning following their latest appearances in 2019.[76]

In March 2021, Armenia and Belarus confirmed their non-participation in the contest; Armenia withdrew due to social and political crises in the aftermath of the 2020 Nagorno-Karabakh war, while Belarus was disqualified after submitting an entry in violation of the rules, thereby reducing the number of participating countries to 39.[77][78]

Returning artists[edit]

After the cancellation of the 2020 contest, the participating broadcasters of 24 countries announced that, for the 2021 contest, they would internally select the same artists initially selected for 2020. In addition, the artists initially selected for Estonia and Lithuania in 2020 won their national finals to represent their countries in 2021.

Discounting 2020, the contest will feature three representatives who also previously performed as lead vocalists for the same country, and five artists who participated in other Eurovision events or as backing vocalists for the same or for another country.

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Natalia Gordienko  Moldova 2006 (alongside Arsenium)[79]
Senhit  San Marino 2011[80]
Sanja Vučić (member of Hurricane)  Serbia 2016[81]
Ksenija Knežević (member of Hurricane) 2015 (as backing vocal for Knez, representing Montenegro)[81]
Destiny Chukunyere  Malta Junior Eurovision 2015 (winner)
2019 (as backing vocal for Michela Pace)[82]
Stefania  Greece Junior Eurovision 2016 (representing the Netherlands as a member of Kisses)[83]
Vincent Bueno  Austria 2017 (as backing vocal for Nathan Trent)[84]
Vasil  North Macedonia 2019 (as backing vocal for Tamara Todevska)[85]

Semi-final 1[edit]

The first semi-final will take place on 18 May 2021 at 21:00 (CEST).[39] Sixteen countries will participate in the first semi-final. Those countries plus Germany, Italy and the Netherlands will vote in this semi-final. Belarus was originally allocated to participate in the first half of the semi-final, but was disqualified from the contest after submitting an entry in violation of the rules.[78]

Draw[86] Country[76] Artist[87] Song[87] Language(s) Place Points
01  Lithuania The Roop "Discoteque" English
02  Slovenia Ana Soklič "Amen" English
03  Russia Manizha "Russian Woman" Russian, English
04  Sweden Tusse "Voices" English
05  Australia[c] Montaigne "Technicolour" English
06  North Macedonia Vasil "Here I Stand" English
07  Ireland Lesley Roy "Maps" English
08  Cyprus Elena Tsagrinou "El diablo" English[d]
09  Norway Tix "Fallen Angel" English
10  Croatia Albina "Tick-Tock" English, Croatian
11  Belgium Hooverphonic "The Wrong Place" English
12  Israel Eden Alene "Set Me Free" English[e]
13  Romania Roxen "Amnesia" English
14  Azerbaijan Efendi "Mata Hari" English[f]
15  Ukraine Go_A "Shum" (Шум) Ukrainian
16  Malta Destiny "Je me casse" English[g]

Semi-final 2[edit]

The second semi-final will take place on 20 May 2021 at 21:00 (CEST).[39] Seventeen countries will participate in the second semi-final. Those countries plus France, Spain and the United Kingdom will vote in this semi-final.[53] Armenia was originally allocated to participate in the second half of the semi-final, but withdrew from the contest due to social and political crises in the aftermath of the 2020 Nagorno-Karabakh war.[77]

Draw[86] Country[76] Artist[89] Song[89] Language(s) Place Points
01  San Marino Senhit[h] "Adrenalina" English[i]
02  Estonia Uku Suviste "The Lucky One" English
03  Czech Republic Benny Cristo "Omaga" English[j]
04  Greece Stefania "Last Dance" English
05  Austria Vincent Bueno "Amen" English
06  Poland Rafał "The Ride" English
07  Moldova Natalia Gordienko "Sugar" English
08  Iceland Daði og Gagnamagnið "10 Years" English
09  Serbia Hurricane "Loco Loco" Serbian[k]
10  Georgia Tornike Kipiani "You" English
11  Albania Anxhela Peristeri "Karma" Albanian
12  Portugal The Black Mamba "Love Is on My Side" English
13  Bulgaria Victoria "Growing Up Is Getting Old" English
14  Finland Blind Channel "Dark Side" English
15  Latvia Samanta Tīna "The Moon Is Rising" English
16   Switzerland Gjon's Tears "Tout l'Univers" French
17  Denmark Fyr & Flamme "Øve os på hinanden" Danish

Final[edit]

The final will take place on 22 May 2021 at 21:00 (CEST).[39] Twenty-six countries will participate in the final, composed of the host country, the Big Five, and the ten best-ranked entries of each of the two semi-finals. All thirty-nine participating countries will vote in the final.

Draw Country[76] Artist[90] Song[90] Language(s)
 France Barbara Pravi "Voilà" French
 Germany Jendrik "I Don't Feel Hate" English[l]
 Italy Måneskin "Zitti e buoni" Italian
 Spain Blas Cantó "Voy a quedarme" Spanish
 United Kingdom James Newman "Embers" English
23[53]  Netherlands Jeangu Macrooy "Birth of a New Age" English, Sranan Tongo

Other countries[edit]

Eligibility for potential participation in the Eurovision Song Contest requires a national broadcaster with active EBU membership that would be able to broadcast the contest via the Eurovision network. The EBU issued an invitation of participation in the contest to all active members. Associate member Australia does not need an invitation for the 2021 contest, as it had previously been granted permission to participate at least until 2023.[91]

Active EBU members[edit]

  •  Andorra – In November 2019, Democrats for Andorra, the ruling party of Andorra, stated that the country would eventually return to the contest, with a cost assessment as a prerequisite.[92] Susanne Georgi, the 2009 Andorran representative, stated in May 2020 that she had secured the funding required for the country to return.[93] Later that year, on 1 August 2020, Georgi explained on Eurovision fan website Wiwibloggs' podcast that she had held a meeting with Prime Minister of Andorra Xavier Espot Zamora, in which they verbally agreed to make a return to the 2022 contest (as they did not want to participate under the circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic).[94]
  •  Armenia – Having intended to compete in 2020, Armenia were initially confirmed for the 2021 contest when the list of participants was announced by the EBU in October 2020, and were set to perform in the second half of the second semi-final.[76][53] However, on 5 March 2021, the Public Television Company of Armenia (AMPTV) confirmed that they were subsequently unable to participate due to social and political crises in the country in the aftermath of 2020 Nagorno-Karabakh war.[77]
  •  Belarus – Having intended to compete in 2020, Belarus were initially confirmed for the 2021 contest when the list of participants was announced by the EBU in October 2020, and were set to perform in the first half of the first semi-final. However, on 26 March 2021, Belarus was disqualified by the EBU after their entry "Ya nauchu tebya (I'll Teach You)" by Galasy ZMesta was rejected due to violating the rules, and not being able to submit an eligible replacement entry.[78]
  •  Bosnia and Herzegovina – In October 2020, Bosnian broadcaster Radio and Television of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BHRT) confirmed that the country would not return in 2021, citing ongoing financial issues. Bosnia and Herzegovina last participated in 2016.[95]
  •  Luxembourg - In July 2020, RTL Télé Lëtzebuerg confirmed that Luxembourg would not participate in 2021, stating that they have no "focus on entertainment and music shows" and that participating "would put the broadcaster under a financial strain".[96] Luxembourg last participated in 1993.
  •  Monaco – Monégasque broadcaster TMC confirmed in September 2020 that they would not participate in 2021.[97]
  •  Montenegro – Montenegrin broadcaster Radio and Television of Montenegro (RTCG) confirmed in October 2020 that they would not participate in 2021.[98] They had previously withdrawn from competing in the later-cancelled 2020 contest due to a series of poor results and the costs associated with participation.
  •  Morocco – In response to rumours that the EBU had been in discussions with Morocco regarding participation, Karim Sbai, the Director of Communications of Morocco's Société Nationale de Radiodiffusion et de Télévision, stated in February 2020 that Morocco's possible return had not yet been discussed.[99] Ultimately, Morocco was not included on the final list of participants for 2021.[76]
  •  Slovakia – In July 2020, a spokesperson from Radio and Television of Slovakia (RTVS) stated that the broadcaster was unlikely to participate,[100] and confirmed their non-participation in August 2020.[101]
  •  Turkey – In May 2020, Faruk Kaymakcı, Turkish Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs & Director for EU Affairs, stated that he hoped to see Turkey returning.[102] However, Turkey was not included on the final list of participants for 2021.[76] Turkey last took part in 2012.

Associate EBU members[edit]

  •  Kazakhstan – In August 2020, the EBU stated that they had no intention to invite Kazakhstan for this year.[103]

Non-EBU members[edit]

  •  Kosovo – In August 2020, the EBU stated that they had no intention to invite Kosovo for this year.[103]
  •  Liechtenstein – In July 2020, Liechtensteiner broadcaster 1 FL TV announced that they had ruled out debuting in 2021. The broadcaster had attempted to become an EBU member in the past but halted its plans when its director, Peter Kölbel, unexpectedly died. It would also need the backing of the Liechtenstein government to be able to carry the cost of becoming an EBU member and paying the participation fee for the contest.[104]

Broadcasters, commentators and spokespersons[edit]

Spokespersons[edit]

The points given out by the national juries will be announced during the final by a spokesperson from each participating country. The following spokespersons have been announced as of May 2021:

Broadcasters and commentators[edit]

All participating broadcasters may choose to have on-site or remote commentators providing an insight about the show to their local audience and, while they must broadcast at least the semi-final they are voting in and the final, most broadcasters air all three shows with different programming plans. Similarly, some non-participating broadcasters may still want to air the contest. These are the broadcasters that have confirmed their broadcasting plans and/or their commentators:

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Show(s) Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Albania
 Australia All shows SBS Myf Warhurst and Joel Creasey [117][118]
 Austria All shows ORF 1 Andi Knoll [119]
 Azerbaijan
 Belgium All shows Eén Dutch: Peter Van de Veire [120]
All shows[m] La Une, RTBF Auvio, VivaCité French: Maureen Louys and Jean-Louis Lahaye [121]
 Bulgaria All shows BNT 1 [122]
 Croatia HRT
 Cyprus All shows RIK 1, RIK HD Louis Patsalides [123]
 Czech Republic Both semi-finals ČT2 Jan Maxián and Albert Černý [124][125]
Final ČT1
 Denmark All shows DR1 Henrik Milling and Nicolai Molbech [126]
 Estonia All shows ETV Estonian: Marko Reikop [127]
ETV+ Russian: Aleksandr Hobotov and Julia Kalenda [128]
 Finland All shows Yle TV1, Yle Radio Suomi, Yle X3M Finnish: Mikko Silvennoinen
Swedish: Eva Frantz and Johan Lindroos
Russian: Levan Tvaltvadze
[129]
 France Both semi-finals Culturebox, France 4 Laurence Boccolini [130][108]
Final France 2 Stéphane Bern and Laurence Boccolini
 Georgia
 Germany Both semi-finals One Peter Urban [131]
Final Das Erste, One
 Greece All shows ERT1 Maria Kozakou and Giorgos Kapoutzidis [132]
 Iceland All shows RÚV Gísli Marteinn Baldursson [133]
 Ireland
 Israel 1st semi-final and final Kan 11 Asaf Liberman and Geula Even-Sa'ar [109][134]
2nd semi-final Asaf Liberman and Akiva Novik
 Italy Both semi-finals Rai 4 Ema Stokholma and Saverio Raimondo [135][136][137]
Final Rai 1 Gabriele Corsi and Cristiano Malgioglio
Rai Radio 2
 Latvia
 Lithuania All shows LRT televizija Ramūnas Zilnys [138]
 Malta
 Moldova
 Netherlands All shows NPO 1 Cornald Maas and Sander Lantinga [139]
 North Macedonia
 Norway All shows NRK1 Marte Stokstad [140][141]
 Poland All shows TVP1, TVP Polonia Marek Sierocki and Aleksander Sikora [142][143][144]
 Portugal All shows[n] RTP1, RTP Internacional José Carlos Malato and Nuno Galopim [111][146]
 Romania All shows TVR [147]
 Russia All shows Channel One Yuri Aksyuta and Yana Churikova [148]
 San Marino
 Serbia
 Slovenia Both semi-finals TV Slovenija 2 [149][150]
Final TV Slovenija 1 [113]
 Spain Both semi-finals La 2 Tony Aguilar, Julia Varela and Víctor Escudero [151]
Final La 1
 Sweden All shows SVT1 Edward af Sillén and Christer Björkman [114]
SR P4 Carolina Norén [152]
  Switzerland Both semi-finals SRF zwei German: Sven Epiney [153]
Final
 Ukraine All shows UA:First Timur Miroshnychenko [154]
STB Serhiy Prytula [155]
 United Kingdom Both semi-finals BBC Four Rylan Clark-Neal, Chelcee Grimes and Scott Mills [156][116][157]
Final BBC One Graham Norton
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Show(s) Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Canada All shows Omni Television No commentary [158]

Incidents[edit]

Belarusian disqualification[edit]

After "Ya nauchu tebya (I'll Teach You)" was announced as the Belarusian entry for the contest, the EBU ruled that the song did not comply with the contest's rules against political entries, and that the song was not eligible to compete in the contest unless it was modified or replaced.[159] After failing to meet an extended deadline for submitting an eligible entry, with their second submission "Pesnyu pro zaytsa (Song About Hares)" also being found to not comply with the rules, it was announced on 26 March 2021 that Belarus was disqualified from the contest.[78]

Other awards[edit]

Marcel Bezençon Awards[edit]

The Marcel Bezençon Awards honour the best competing songs in the final. Named after the founder of the contest, the awards were created and first handed at the 2002 contest by Christer Björkman (Sweden's representative in the 1992 contest and the country's current Head of Delegation), and Richard Herrey (a member of the Herreys who won the 1984 contest for Sweden).[160] The awards are divided into three categories: Artistic Award, Composers Award, and Press Award.[161] The winners will be revealed shortly before the Eurovision final.

OGAE[edit]

OGAE is an international organisation which conducts a voting poll for the favourite songs among its members before the annual contest. It consists of a network of over 40 Eurovision Song Contest fan clubs across Europe and beyond.[162][163] The top five overall results, after 21 out of 43 votes had been cast (as of 2 May 2021) are shown below.[164]

Country Performer(s) Song OGAE result
  Switzerland Gjon's Tears "Tout l'Univers" 194
 Malta Destiny "Je me casse" 169
 France Barbara Pravi "Voilà" 162
 Lithuania The Roop "Discoteque" 143
 San Marino Senhit[h] "Adrenalina" 118

Additional programming[edit]

Eurovision Song Celebration: Live-On-Tape[edit]

The EBU announced on 29 March 2021 that Eurovision Song Celebration would be returning for a second edition, premiering on the contest's official YouTube channel. The show, presented by Krista Siegfrids and airs in two parts on 28 and 29 May, will showcase all 39 'live-on-tape' back-up performances, alongside other bonus material. Like in the previous year's Song Celebration, fans will be asked to contribute to the show by sending videoclips of their favourite entries.[36][165]

Krista Calling[edit]

Krista Siegfrids will also host Krista Calling, a backstage series to be broadcast on the contest's official YouTube channel.[166] The series premiered on 28 April 2021 and will run for six episodes until 21 May, and will include interviews and behind-the-scenes coverage from Rotterdam.[165][167]

LookLab with NikkieTutorials[edit]

Alongside the main contest, Nikkie de Jager will also host LookLab with NikkieTutorials, a backstage series to be broadcast on the contest's official YouTube channel.[37] The series will run daily from 10 to 21 May 2021, and will feature all 39 participants "discussing the glitter, glamour and gossip of the 65th Eurovision Song Contest".

Official album[edit]

Eurovision Song Contest: Rotterdam 2021
ESC 2021 album cover.png
Compilation album by
Released23 April 2021
GenrePop
Length
  • 56:29 (CD 1)
  • 58:54 (CD 2)
LabelUniversal
Eurovision Song Contest chronology
Eurovision: A Tribute to the Artists and Songs 2020
(2020)
Eurovision Song Contest: Rotterdam 2021
(2021)

Eurovision Song Contest: Rotterdam 2021 is the official compilation album of the contest, put together by the European Broadcasting Union and was released by Universal Music Group digitally on 16 April 2021 and physically on 23 April 2021.[168][169] The album features all 39 entries including the semi-finalists that failed to qualify for the final.

Charts[edit]

Chart (2021) Peak
position
Dutch Compilation Albums (Compilation Top 30)[170] 1
German Compilation Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[171] 3
Swedish Physical Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[172] 4
UK Compilation Albums (OCC)[173] 7

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Armenia withdrew from the contest on 5 March 2021.[54]
  2. ^ Belarus was disqualified from the contest on 26 March 2021.[55]
  3. ^ Due to travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic in the country, Australia will compete using their 'live-on-tape' performance.[88]
  4. ^ Contains repeated words in Spanish
  5. ^ Contains several phrases in Hebrew
  6. ^ Contains one repeated chant in Azerbaijani
  7. ^ Contains one repeated phrase in French
  8. ^ a b The song features vocals from Flo Rida.
  9. ^ Contains one repeated word in Italian
  10. ^ Contains one sentence in Czech
  11. ^ Contains one phrase in English and one repeated word in Spanish
  12. ^ Contains two spoken sentences in German
  13. ^ The show will be 60-minute-delayed on VivaCité.
  14. ^ The first semi-final will be broadcast delayed.[145]

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