Eurovision Young Musicians 2018

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Eurovision Young Musicians 2018
Eurovision Young Musicians 2018.png
Dates
Semi-final 1 18 August 2018
Semi-final 2 19 August 2018
Final 23 August 2018
Host
Venue Usher Hall, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Presenter(s) Petroc Trelawny
Josie d'Arby (final only)
Conductor Thomas Dausgaard
Directed by Rhodri Huw
Executive supervisor Jon Ola Sand
Executive producer Paul Bullock
Host broadcaster BBC Scotland (BBC)
Interval act Performance of "Hedwig's Theme" from the Harry Potter score (not included in televised broadcast)[1]
Participants
Number of entries 18
Debuting countries  Albania
Returning countries  Belgium
 Estonia
 Greece
 Israel
 Russia
 Spain
 United Kingdom
Withdrawing countries  Austria
Vote
Voting system Each juror awarded a mark from 1–10 to each performer based on specific criteria
Winning musician  Russia
Ivan Bessonov

The Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 was the nineteenth edition of the Eurovision Young Musicians contest. It was hosted by the United Kingdom, for the first time since the inaugural contest in 1982. This edition was a co-production between the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), the Edinburgh International Festival and the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) as host broadcaster. Musicians representing eighteen countries with EBU membership participated in the contest, with Albania making their debut alongside seven returning countries, while Austria withdrew from participation for the first time.

The final concert took place at the Usher Hall in Edinburgh on 23 August 2018, with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra under their principal conductor Thomas Dausgaard. It was produced by BBC Cymru Wales for broadcast by BBC Scotland and BBC Radio 3, with Petroc Trelawny and Josie d'Arby being the presenters for the show. Ivan Bessonov of Russia won the contest, marking the country's first win in the competition and the first pianist to win since Poland's Stanisław Drzewiecki in 2000.

Location[edit]

Usher Hall, Edinburgh – host venue of the Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 final.

Usher Hall, the venue for the final, is a concert hall situated on Lothian Road, in the west end of Edinburgh, Scotland. It has hosted concerts and events since its construction in 1914 and can hold approximately 2,900[2] people in its recently restored auditorium, which is well loved by performers due to its acoustics. The Hall is flanked by The Royal Lyceum Theatre on the right and The Traverse Theatre on the left. Historic Scotland has registered the Hall with Category A listed building status. The hall previously hosted the Eurovision Song Contest 1972 after Monaco, which won the year before, was unable to provide a suitable venue.[3] The last time the United Kingdom hosted a Eurovision network contest was the Eurovision Dance Contest 2008 in Glasgow.[4]

Bidding phase[edit]

According to an earlier statement by Vladislav Yakovlev, the former executive supervisor of the event, Budapest could host the 2018 contest after bidding for the 2016 edition.[5] On 27 October 2016, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) launched a call to submit applications for the competition.[6]

Host city announcement[edit]

In early October 2017, Norwegian broadcaster Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) confirmed in an online article regarding its national selection Virtuos, that the United Kingdom would host this edition of the contest in August 2018.[7] On 30 October 2017, the EBU announced that this edition of the contest would be held in Edinburgh between 16 and 24 of August 2018.[8]

Format[edit]

The semi-final round returned in 2018, produced by BBC Radio 3 in the form of public chamber recitals, at the Studio of the Edinburgh Festival Theatre on 18 and 19 August 2018.[9]

Presenters[edit]

On 6 August 2018, it was announced that Petroc Trelawny and Josie D'Arby would host the 2018 competition.[10] Trelawny’s career started at BBC Radio Devon in 1989 as a reporter, before he made his transition to a career in classical music radio and television during the 1990s. Since 1998 he has been a presenter at BBC Radio 3, and is the face of classical magazine programme Music Matters, Radio 3’s Breakfast and concerts in Radio 3 Live in Concert. D’Arby started on Children's BBC (CBBC) in the 1990s before becoming the youngest woman to have her own chat show, Josie, in 1999 on Channel 5. She has co-presented a number of cultural programs for the BBC including; Young Musician of the Year since 2012, Cardiff Singer of the World since 2009, Songs of Praise since 2014 and Young Choir of the Year (2018). Her acting credits include playing series regular WPC Jodie Finn, in BBC One drama Merseybeat from 2002–04. On 11 August 2018, it was revealed that the semi finals would be hosted by Trelawny, with D'Arby joining him in the final.[11]

Jury members[edit]

The winner of the competition was decided by an international panel of classical music luminaries. On 10 August 2018, the EBU announced the jurors of the competition. The judges for the semi-finals are British bassoonist Ursula Leveaux, Spanish percussionist Noè Roderigo Gisbert, Korean pianist Sinae Lee, and the chair cellist and conductor David Watkin.[12] Joining Watkin's at the final were American conductor and violinist Marin Alsop, composer and performer Anna Meredith, Scottish classical composer and conductor James MacMillan and Head of Music for the Edinburgh International Festival, Andrew Moore.[13]

Voting[edit]

Altogether there are two set of juries: one for the two days of semi-finals and one for the final. In both juries, each juror was to independently rate each performer a score from 1–10 points. The following criteria were taken into account by the jurors in the semi-finals and finals:

  • Technical Accuracy
  • Quality of Sound
  • Interpretation
  • Performance

After each juror has awarded his points, these were added together and the result presented to the jury first. However following discussion, the jury may make changes to the numerical rankings by mutual agreement. The six finalists were announced in a random order after the semi-finals on a separate live stream.[14][12] In addition, it was announced that the jury in the final would not know the results of the semi-final jury to avoid interference. In the final, only the winner was announced during the televised broadcast.[15]

Participating countries[edit]

The final list of participants were announced on 2 February 2018, with eighteen countries confirming their participation, the highest number since 2006.[9] Albania made their debut whilst seven countries, Belgium, Estonia, Greece, Israel, Russia, Spain and United Kingdom, all returned to the Eurovision Young Musicians in 2018.[16] Belgium last participated in 2006, Estonia in 2004, Greece in 2014, Israel in 1986 and Spain in 2000. Russia and host country, the United Kingdom, most recently took part in 2010.

Semi-finals[edit]

The semi-finals consisted of six hour-long shows spread over two days. A total of eighteen countries took part, of which six qualified to the grand final. In each semi-final, three musicians performed, either solo or with piano accompaniment, for a total of 18 minutes each.

18 August[edit]

Draw[17] Country[17] Performer[17] Instrument[17] Piece(s)[17] Result
Semi-final 1
01  Malta Bernice Sammut Piano

1) Toccata from Trois pièces by F. Poulenc
2) Prelude in C minor, Op. 23 No. 7 by S. Rachmaninov
3) Prelude in G sharp minor, Op. 32 No. 12 by S. Rachmaninov
4) Scherzo No. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 31 by F. Chopin

Failed to qualify
02  United Kingdom Maxim Calver Cello

1) Sacher Variation by W. Lutoslawski
2) Adagio Affettuoso from Cello Sonata in F, Op. 99 by J. Brahms
3) No. 5 Minuetto e Finale from Suite Italienne by I. Stravinsky

Failed to qualify
03  Spain Sara Valencia Violin

1) Caprice Basque Op. 24 by P. Sarasate
2) Caprice No. 13 in B flat major by N. Paganini
3) 3rd mvt (Finale) of Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor Op. 24 by M. Bruch

Failed to qualify
Semi-final 2
04  Slovenia Nikola Pajanović Violin

1) Tambourin Chinois by F. Kreisler
2) Capriccio No. 7 by N. Paganini
3) Sonata for violin solo No. 3 in D minor by E. Ysaÿe

Qualified
05  San Marino Francesco Stefanelli Cello

1) Violoncello Totale for cello solo by K. Penderecki
2) I mov, Cello Sonata in F major, Op. 99 by J. Brahms
3) Papillon, Op. 77 by G. Fauré
4) V mov, Sonata for cello and piano in C, Op. 65 by B. Britten

Failed to qualify
06  Poland Marta Chlebicka Flute

1) Hamburger Sonate in G major by CPE Bach
2) Rigoletto Fantasie, Op. 335 by W. Popp

Failed to qualify
Semi-final 3
07  Hungary Máté Bencze Saxophone

1) Fantaisie sur un thème original by J. Demersseman
2) Allegro from Sonata in G minor BWV. 1020 by JS Bach
3) Pequeña Czarda by P. Iturralde

Qualified
08  Greece Thanos Tzanetakis Guitar

1) Fantasia in D minor by D. Kellner
2) 3rd Bagatelle from Five Bagatelles for guitar by W. Walton
3) 5th Bagatelle from Five Bagatelles for guitar by W. Walton
4) Variaciones sobre un tema de Fernando Sor, Op. 19 by M. Llobet

Failed to qualify
09  Israel Tamir Naaman-Pery Cello

1) Hungarian Rhapsody, Op. 68 by D. Popper
2) Preludio-Fantasia from Suite for Cello by G. Cassadó

Failed to qualify

19 August[edit]

Draw[18] Country[18] Performer[18] Instrument[18] Piece(s)[18] Result
Semi-final 4
10  Estonia Tanel-Eiko Novikov Percussion

1) Niflheim by Marján Csaba Zoltán
2) Kuusi Op 75/5 by Sibelius
3) Verano porteño by Piazzolla

Failed to qualify
11  Belgium Alexandra Cooreman Violin

1) Presto from Sonata for piano and violin Op 23 by Beethoven
2) Valse-Scherzo by Tchaikovsky

Failed to qualify
12  Albania Klaudio Zoto Cello

1) Cello Sonata by Grieg
2) Hungarian Rhapsody by Popper

Failed to qualify
Semi-final 5
13  Russia Ivan Bessonov Piano

1) Mazurka in B flat minor, Op 24 No 4 by Chopin
2) Fantaisie-Impromptu in C sharp minor, Op 66 by Chopin
3) Prelude in G minor, Op 23 No 5 by Rachmaninov
4) Barncleupédie by James MacMillan

Qualified
14  Germany Mira Foron Violin

1) Cadenza for solo viola by Penderecki
2) Tzigane by Ravel

Qualified
15  Czech Republic Indi Stivín Double bass

1) Bohemian Suite, 1st Movement: "Celts" by I. Stivin
2) Bohemian Suite, 2nd mvt: "Czech Country" by I. Stivin
3) Bohemian Suite, 3rd mvt: Tarantella Praga by I. Stivin[19]

Qualified
Semi-final 6
16  Sweden Johanna Ander Ljung Harp

1) Improvisations for Harp, Op 10 by Mathias
2) Allemande from Suite No 5 in F by Loeillet
3) Féerie - Prelude et Dance by Tournier

Failed to qualify
17  Norway Birgitta Elisa Oftestad Cello

1) 1st mvt from Cello Concerto No 1 by Shostakovich
2) Adagio and Allegro by Schumann

Qualified
18  Croatia Jan Tominić Saxophone

1) Fantaisie sur un thème original by Demersseman
2) Cinq danses exotiques by Françaix
3) Aria by Bozza
4) Brasileira from Scaramouche by Milhaud

Failed to qualify

Final[edit]

Six contestants were selected by the first jury to progress to the Final and the second decided the winner of Eurovision Young Musicians 2018.[20] Each finalist performed one or more movements of a single musical work, accompanied by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, for up to 12 minutes.[21] The winner received a custom-made engraved trophy, a cash prize of €7,000, and a performance opportunity with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra in a forthcoming season. The runner-up received a cash prize of €3,000.[22]

Draw[23] Country[23] Performer[23] Instrument[23] Piece(s)[23] Place[23]
01  Norway Birgitta Elisa Oftestad Cello 4th mvt from Cello Concerto by E. Elgar -
02  Slovenia Nikola Pajanović Violin 3rd mvt from Violin Concerto by P.I. Tchaikovsky 2
03  Czech Republic Indi Stivín Double bass 2nd and 3rd mvt from Bohemian Suite for Double Bass by I. Stivín -
04  Germany Mira Foron Violin 3rd mvt from Violin Concerto by J. Sibelius -
05  Hungary Máté Bencze Saxophone Concerto da Camera for Saxophone by J. Ibert -
06  Russia Ivan Bessonov Piano 3rd mvt from Piano Concerto No. 1 by P.I. Tchaikovsky 1

Broadcasting[edit]

The following countries, listed in order of broadcasting dates, confirmed that they would broadcast the contest along with the dates of broadcasting schedules. Alongside television and radio, coverage was also livestreamed on the online platforms of the broadcasters in Belgium, Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece, Poland, San Marino, Slovenia, Spain and the UK.[24] The semi-finals and the final were broadcast live on the internet via the official YouTube channel of the competition.[25]

Semi-finals[edit]

Date of broadcast[24] Country[24] Station[24]
18 August 2018  Malta TVM2 (semi-final 1)
 Israel KAN Kol Ha Musica (semi-final 3)
18–19 August 2018
 Belgium La Trois (semi-final 4)
 Estonia Klassikaraadio
Flag of Earth.svg Rest of the world YouTube[25]
 United Kingdom BBC Radio 3
19 August 2018  Spain La 2 (semi-final 1)
20–21 August 2018  Russia Russia-K
21–22 August 2018  Spain Radio Clásica
22–23 August 2018  Estonia ETV2
23 August 2018  Czech Republic ČT art (semi-final 5)
 Hungary M5 (semi-final 3)
 Norway NRK2 (semi-final 6)

Final[edit]

Date of broadcast[24] Country[24] Station[24] Commentators
23 August 2018
 Albania RTSH 1 Unknown
 Belgium La Trois Camille De Rijck[26]
 Croatia HRT 3 Jana Haluza[27]
 Czech Republic ČT art Jiří Vejvoda[28]
 Estonia Klassikaraadio No commentary
ETV1
 Greece ERT2 Mihalis Messinis[29]
 Hungary M5 Bősze Ádám
 Malta TVM2 No commentary
 Norway NRK2 Arild Erikstad[30]
NRK Klassisk
 Poland TVP Kultura Aleksander Laskowski
Flag of Earth.svg Rest of the world YouTube[25] No commentary
 Russia Russia-K Unknown
 San Marino SMRTV
 Slovenia TV Slovenija 1 Andrej Hofer[31]
 Spain Radio Clásica Silvia Pérez Arroyo and Fernando Blázquez[32]
 United Kingdom BBC Two Scotland[a] No commentary
BBC Red Button[a]
24 August 2018 BBC Radio 3
25 August 2018  Sweden SVT2
2 September 2018  Germany WDR Fernsehen Unknown
10 September 2018  Israel KAN Chinukhit
KAN 11
29 September 2018  Spain La 2[b] Juan Antonio Simarro[32][33]

Other countries[edit]

For a country to be eligible for potential participation in the Eurovision Young Musicians, it needs to be an active member of the European Broadcasting Union (EBU).[34] It is unknown whether the EBU issue invitations of participation to all 56 active members like they do for the Eurovision Song Contest and Junior Eurovision Song Contest.[34] The EBU Active Members listed below have made the following announcements in regards to their decisions.

Active EBU Members[edit]

  •  Austria – On 29 October 2017, the Austrian broadcaster Österreichischer Rundfunk (ORF) announced that they were discussing whether they will participate in Eurovision Young Musicians 2018.[35] Austria decided to withdraw from the 2018 edition, after participating at every previous edition of the contest, with no reasons for their withdrawal being published.[36]
  •  Bosnia and Herzegovina – On 24 October 2017, BHRT confirmed that due to financial difficulties the country would not return to the contest in 2018. Bosnia and Herzegovina's last, and only, participation was at the 2012 Young Musicians event.[37]
  •  Cyprus – On 2 January 2018, Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation (CyBC) confirmed that due to financial difficulties the country would not return to the contest in 2018. Cyprus last participated at the 2010 Young Musicians event.[38]
  •  Denmark – On 3 January 2018, Danish Broadcasting Corporation (DR) confirmed that the country would not return to the contest in 2018 and are unlikely to participate in the competition in the coming years. Denmark last participated at the 2002 Young Musicians event.[39]
  •  Finland – On 12 January 2018, Yleisradio (YLE) confirmed that the country would not return to the contest in 2018. Finland last participated at the 2008 Young Musicians event.[40]
  •  Ireland – On 28 October 2017, Raidió Teilifís Éireann (RTÉ) announced that it would not return to the 2018 Eurovision Young Musicians. Ireland last participated at the 2000 Young Musicians event. However, the Irish-language broadcaster, TG4, which is eligible to take over the responsibility of Ireland's participation, has not released any statements regarding a return to the contest.[41] Ireland was not on the final list of participants released by the EBU.
  •  Latvia – On 4 November 2017, Latvijas Televīzija (LTV) confirmed that the country would not return to the contest in 2018. Latvia last participated at the 2002 Young Musicians event.[42]
  •  Netherlands – On 30 January 2018, Omroep NTR (NTR) confirmed that the country would not return to the contest in 2018. The Netherlands last participated at the 2014 Young Musicians event.[43]
  •   Switzerland – On 11 November 2017, Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen (SRF) confirmed that the country would not return to the contest in 2018. Switzerland last participated at the 2006 Young Musicians event.[44]
  •  Ukraine – On 5 January 2018, National Public Broadcasting Company of Ukraine (UA:PBC) announced that the country is considering a return to the contest in 2018.[45] However, on 14 January 2018, UA:PBC confirmed that the country will not return to the Eurovision Young Musicians in 2018. Ukraine last participated at the 2012 Young Musicians event.[46]

The following list of countries have participated at least once since the inaugural contest in 1982 but have not stated their reasons for their continued absence in competing:[47]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The final was broadcast on a 30-minute delay.[24]
  2. ^ The finals would have been aired live on La 2 if Spain had qualified for the final.[32]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Weaver's Week 2018-08-26 - UKGameshows". www.ukgameshows.com. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  2. ^ "Geograph:: The Usher Hall, Edinburgh (C) Kevin Rae". www.geograph.org.uk. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  3. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1972". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  4. ^ "The Eurovision Dance Contest Glides Into Glasgow". BBC Press office. 7 July 2008. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  5. ^ "WDR and Cologne chosen to host 2016 competition". youngmusicians.tv. European Broadcasting Union. 9 December 2014.
  6. ^ Granger, Anthony (27 October 2016). "Eurovision Young Musicians: Calls for bids for 2018 host broadcaster". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 14 August 2017.
  7. ^ Mazoyer, Vincent (22 October 2017). "The UK will host Eurovision Young Musicians 2018!". Escxtra.com. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  8. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians is coming to Edinburgh in 2018!". youngmusicians.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  9. ^ a b "Eurovision Young Musicians". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  10. ^ Granger, Anthony (6 August 2018). "Petroc Trelawny and Josie D'Arby to Host Eurovision Young Musicians 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 6 August 2018.
  11. ^ "Photo gallery: The 2018 Hosts". youngmusicians.tv. 11 August 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  12. ^ a b "The other Eurovision: 18 young virtuosos pitch up in Edinburgh". BBC. Retrieved 9 August 2018.
  13. ^ "These are the jury members of Eurovision Young Musicians 2018". youngmusicians.tv. 10 August 2018. Retrieved 10 August 2018.
  14. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 Finalists to Be Revealed on August 19". eurovoix.com. 13 August 2018. Retrieved 19 August 2018.
  15. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians 2018: The rules, the prizes, the trophy". youngmusicians.tv. European Broadcasting Union. 15 August 2018. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  16. ^ "These are the 18 participants of Eurovision Young Musicians 2018". youngmusicians.tv. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  17. ^ a b c d e "Edinburgh 2018 - Semi-Final Day 1 - Eurovision Young Musicians". youngmusicians.tv. Retrieved 9 August 2018.
  18. ^ a b c d e "Edinburgh 2018 - Semi-Final Day 2 - Eurovision Young Musicians". youngmusicians.tv. Retrieved 9 August 2018.
  19. ^ "Indi Stivín - Eurovision Young Musicians". youngmusicians.tv. Retrieved 19 August 2018.
  20. ^ Jordan, Paul (2 February 2018). "Eurovision Young Musicians welcomes 18 participants in 2018!". youngmusicians.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 3 February 2018. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  21. ^ "Trophy - Eurovision Young Musicians". youngmusicians.tv. Retrieved 9 August 2018.
  22. ^ "EBU - Russia's Ivan Bessonov wins Eurovision Young Musicians 2018". www.ebu.ch. European Broadcasting Union. 23 August 2018. Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  23. ^ a b c d e f "Final - Edinburgh 2018 - Eurovision Young Musicians". youngmusicians.tv. Retrieved 19 August 2018.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h "Local broadcast coverage". youngmusicians.tv. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  25. ^ a b c "Eurovision Young Musicians". YouTube. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  26. ^ "Comment suivre le Concours Eurovision des Jeunes Musiciens" [How to follow the Eurovision Young Musicians Competition] (in French). RTBF. 13 August 2018. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  27. ^ "Croatia: Jana Haluza Revealed as Eurovision Young Musicians Commentator". eurovoix.com. 15 August 2018. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  28. ^ "Czech Republic: ČT art to Broadcast Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 Final". eurovoix.com. 7 August 2018. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  29. ^ "Greece: ERT 2 To Broadcast Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 Final". eurovoix.com. 17 August 2018. Retrieved 17 August 2018.
  30. ^ "Norway: NRK 2 to Broadcast Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 Final Live". eurovoix.com. 14 August 2018. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  31. ^ "Slovenia: Eurovision Young Musicians To Get Prime Time Broadcast on RTVSLO1". eurovoix.com. 11 August 2018. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  32. ^ a b c "Spain: La 2 To Air Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 Final Live If They Qualify". eurovoix.com. 10 August 2018. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  33. ^ David, José (11 September 2018). "Exclusiva: La 2 de TVE emitirá la gran final del Festival de Eurovisión de Jóvenes Músicas el 29 de septiembre". ESCplus.es. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  34. ^ a b Yakovlev, Vladislav (23 January 2014). "Junior Eurovision Song Contest steering group". EBU. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 26 May 2014.
  35. ^ Granger, Anthony (29 October 2017). "Austria: ORF in Discussions Regarding Eurovision Young Musicians Participation". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  36. ^ Farren, Neil (2 February 2018). "Eurovision Young Musicians 2018: 18 Countries to Take Part". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 2 February 2018.
  37. ^ Granger, Anthony (24 October 2017). "Bosnia and Herzegovina: BHRT rules out return to Eurovision Young Musicians". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 24 October 2017.
  38. ^ Granger, Anthony (2 January 2018). "Cyprus: CyBC Will Not Return to Eurovision Young Musicians in 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 5 January 2018.
  39. ^ Granger, Anthony (3 January 2018). "Denmark: Will Not Participate in Eurovision Young Musicians 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 5 January 2018.
  40. ^ Granger, Anthony (12 January 2018). "Finland: YLE Will Not Participate in Eurovision Young Musicians 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 12 January 2018.
  41. ^ Granger, Anthony (28 October 2017). "Ireland: RTÉ Rules Out Return To Eurovision Young Musicians in 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 28 October 2017.
  42. ^ Granger, Anthony (4 November 2017). "Latvia: LTV rules out Eurovision Young Musicians return in 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 4 November 2017.
  43. ^ Granger, Anthony (30 January 2018). "Netherlands: NTR Will Not Participate in Eurovision Young Musicians 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  44. ^ Granger, Anthony (11 November 2017). "Switzerland: SRF Rules Out Return To Eurovision Young Musicians in 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  45. ^ Granger, Anthony (5 January 2018). "Ukraine: Considering Return to Eurovision Young Musicians". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 5 January 2018.
  46. ^ Granger, Anthony (14 January 2018). "Ukraine: UA:PBC Will Not Participate in Eurovision Young Musicians 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  47. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians". youngmusicians.tv. Retrieved 2018-08-16.

External links[edit]