Eutychus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Paul raiseth Eutychus to life, from Figures de la Bible, 1728.
Not to be confused with Eutychius or the early Christian theologian Eutyches.

Eutychus was a young man (or a youth) of Troas tended to by St. Paul. Eutychus fell asleep due to the long nature of the discourse Paul was giving and fell from a windowsill out of the three story building.[1] Paul then embraced him, insisting that he was not dead, and they carried him back upstairs alive; those gathered then had a meal and a long talk which lasted until dawn. This is related in the New Testament book of the Acts of the Apostles 20:7-12.

Though some (e.g. William Barclay, F. F. Bruce), do not believe that Eutychus died, Wayne Jackson observes the following facts: 1) the author Luke, a physician (Col. 4:14), plainly states that Eutychus was "taken up dead" (Greek: ἤρθη νεκρός, erthe nekros); 2) after Paul embraces Eutychus, he says, "Trouble not yourselves, for his life is in him" (Greek: ἡ γὰρ ψυχὴ αὐτοῦ ἐν αὐτῷ ἐστιν, he gar psuche autou en auto estin), not "still in him" as the Weymouth translation erroneously interprets; 3) Eutychus was then "brought alive" by which the others were "not a little comforted," which words would make no sense if Eutychus had not died; and 4) Luke was fully capable of describing someone as only being "supposedly dead" (Greek: νομισαντες αυτον τεθναναι), as he did of Paul in Acts 14:19, but he did not do so here.[2]

The name Eutychus means "fortunate".

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Barclay, William (1955), The Acts of the Apostles (Philadelphia: Westminster Press).
  • Bock, Darrell L. (2007), "Acts: Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament" (Ada, Michigan: Baker Publishing Group)
  • Bruce, F.F. (1977), Paul: Apostle of the Heart Set Free (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans).
  • Oster, Richard (1979), The Acts of the Apostles, Part II (Austin, Texas: Sweet Publishing Company).

External links[edit]