Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Iowa

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Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Iowa
AbbreviationIowa Synod
ClassificationProtestant
OrientationLutheran
TheologyConfessional Lutheran
StructureNational synod, middle level districts, and local congregations
AssociationsNational Lutheran Council
RegionUnited States
HeadquartersDubuque, Iowa
FounderGeorg M. Grossmann
OriginAugust 24, 1854
St. Sebald, Iowa
AbsorbedFirst Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Texas (1896)
Merged intoAmerican Lutheran Church (1930)
Congregations932 (1929)
Members150,683 (1929)
Ministers637 (1929)
Portrait of Georg M. Grossmann

The Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Iowa and Other States, commonly known as the Iowa Synod, was founded on August 24, 1854 at St. Sebald in Clayton County, Iowa. It adopted a constitution and its name (German: Die deutsche evangelishe lutheranish Synode von Iowa), in 1864.[1] The synod was the result of disagreements, in Saginaw, Michigan, that had arisen with some of the pastors sent to America by Johann Konrad Wilhelm Löhe against the Missouri Synod. Some of these pastors joined the Missouri Synod, while pastors Georg M. Grossmann and Johannes Deindoerfer and a small group moved to Iowa.[2]

Most of the congregations of the First Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Texas joined the Iowa Synod as its Texas District in 1896.[3] In 1930 the Iowa Synod merged with the Ohio Synod and the Buffalo Synod to form the American Lutheran Church (ALC).[4] The latter body, after further mergers, became part of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in 1988.

In 1929, just before its merger into the ALC, the Iowa Synod had 637 pastors, 932 congregations, and 150,683 members.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Neve (1816), p. 383.
  2. ^ Neve (1816), pp. 362-384.
  3. ^ Christian Cyclopedia (2000), "United Lutheran Church in America, The, Synods of".
  4. ^ Christian Cyclopedia (2000), "Iowa and Other States, Evangelical Lutheran Synod of".
  5. ^ "Iowa Synod". American Denomination Profiles. Association of Religion Data Archives. Retrieved October 30, 2015.

References[edit]