Evangeline (1919 film)

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Evangeline
Evangeline (1919) - ad still.jpg
Miriam Cooper and Alan Roscoe in still from film (Motion Picture Magazine, February 1920)
Directed by Raoul Walsh
Produced by William Fox
Written by Raoul Walsh (scenario)
Based on Evangeline 
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Starring Miriam Cooper
Distributed by Fox Film Corporation
Release dates
  • September 21, 1919 (1919-09-21)
Running time
6 reels (5,200 feet)
Country United States
Language Silent (English intertitles)

Evangeline is a 1919 American silent drama film produced and distributed by the Fox Film Corporation and directed by Raoul Walsh. The star of the film was Walsh's wife at the time Miriam Cooper in the oft filmed story based on a poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The poem was filmed previously in 1908, 1911, and 1914.

Currently Evangeline is considered to be a lost film.[1][2]

Plot[edit]

As described in a film magazine,[3] Evangeline (cooper) and Gabriel (Roscoe), young people of a small village, gain the consent of their parents and announce their wedding. On the morning of the wedding day, British soldiers land at the town and summon all the Acadians, who are of French descent, to the church where they read the King's order requiring their deportation. The marriage is thus prevented and the two lovers, during the deportation, loose sight of each other and end up in different localities. Released from surveillance, each sets out in search of the other. Their search continues until they are old when Gabriel, victim of a pestilence, is brought to an almshouse where Evangeline is a nurse to the afflicted. Here they are happy for a while until Gabriel's death occurs.

Cast[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Progressive Silent Film List: Evangeline at silentera.com
  2. ^ The Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Catalog: Evangeline
  3. ^ "Reviews: Evangeline". Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 9 (10): 62. August 30, 1919. 

External links[edit]