Eve Merriam

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Eve Merriam
BornEva Moskovitz
(1916-07-19)July 19, 1916
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
DiedApril 11, 1992(1992-04-11) (aged 75)
Manhattan, New York, United States
OccupationPoet
NationalityAmerican
Alma materCornell University
Notable awards
Spouse
ChildrenDee Michel, Guy Michel
RelativesJennifer Salt (stepdaughter)

Eve Merriam (July 19, 1916 – April 11, 1992) was an American poet and writer.

Writing career[edit]

Merriam's first book was the 1946 Family Circle, which won the Yale Younger Poets Prize.[1]

Her book, The Inner City Mother Goose, was described as one of the most banned books of the time.[2] It inspired a 1971 Broadway musical called Inner City and a 1982 musical production called Street Dreams.[2][3] In 1956 she published Emma Lazarus: Woman with a Torch.[4] In 1981 she won the NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children.[2] One of her books for children is Halloween ABC. She published over 30 books,[5] and taught at both City College and New York University.[6]

Her play Out of Our Father's House, based on her book Growing Up Female in America, was televised in the Great Performances series in 1978.

Personal life[edit]

Born as Eve Moskovitz in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, one of four children of Russian immigrants Max Moscovitz and Jennie Siegel.[7] After graduating with an A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1937,[8] Merriam moved to New York to pursue graduate studies at Columbia University. She was married for a time to writer Leonard C. Lewin. She later married screenwriter Waldo Salt and was actress Jennifer Salt's stepmother.

Death[edit]

Merriam died on April 11, 1992 in Manhattan from liver cancer.

References[edit]

Core biographical material[edit]

In other works[edit]

  • Randy Shilts. The Mayor of Castro Street: The Life &Times of Harvey Milk (New York: St. Martins, 1982).
  • Kate Weigand. Red Feminism: American Communism and the Making of Women’s Liberation (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001).

Archival materials[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Biography of Eve Merriam at the Poetry Foundation
  2. ^ a b c Biography of Eve Merriam at the Academy of American Poets http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/159
  3. ^ Michel, Dee (March 15, 2011). "My Memories of Inner City". Masterworks Broadway. Retrieved October 15, 2018.
  4. ^ Merriam, Eve (1956). Emma Lazarus: Woman with a Torch. New York: Citadel Press. LCCN 56-10276.
  5. ^ "Author Eve Merriam dead at 75". UPI Archives. April 12, 1992. Retrieved October 15, 2018.
  6. ^ Lambert, Bruce (April 13, 1992). "Eve Merriam, 75, Poet and Author Who Wrote for Children, Is Dead". New York Times. Retrieved October 15, 2018.
  7. ^ Green, Carol. "Eve Merriam". Jewish Women's Archive Encyclopedia. Retrieved October 15, 2018.
  8. ^ Green, Carol. "Eve Merriam". Jewish Women's Archive Encyclopedia. Retrieved October 15, 2018.