Even the Man in the Moon Is Cryin'

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"Even the Man in the Moon Is Cryin'"
Mark Collie - Even the Man single cover.png
Single by Mark Collie
from the album Mark Collie
B-side"Trouble's Coming Like a Train"[1]
ReleasedAugust 24, 1992
FormatCD single
GenreCountry
Length3:41
LabelMCA
Songwriter(s)Mark Collie, Don Cook
Producer(s)Don Cook
Mark Collie singles chronology
"It Don't Take a Lot"
(1992)
"Even the Man in the Moon Is Cryin'"
(1992)
"Born to Love You"
(1993)

"Even the Man in the Moon Is Cryin'" is a song co-written and recorded by American country music artist Mark Collie. It was released in August 1992 as the first single from the album Mark Collie. The song reached number 5 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart and peaked at number 11 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks chart.[2] Collie wrote the song with Don Cook.

Content[edit]

The song is a ballad, in which the narrator explains that he is upset because his lover has left him.

Critical reception[edit]

Deborah Evans Price, of Billboard magazine gave the song a favorable review, calling it a "praiseworthy delivery of a progressively written ballad." She goes on to call it "infectious and believable." [3]

Music video[edit]

The music video was directed by John Lloyd Miller and premiered in late 1992.

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1992) Peak
position
Canada Country Tracks (RPM)[4] 11
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[5] 5

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1992) Position
Canada Country Tracks (RPM)[6] 99

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 99. ISBN 0-89820-177-2.
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book Of Top 40 Country Hits: 1944-2006, Second edition. Record Research. p. 85.
  3. ^ Billboard, August 15, 1992
  4. ^ "Top RPM Country Tracks: Issue 1864." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. November 28, 1992. Retrieved August 15, 2013.
  5. ^ "Mark Collie Chart History (Hot Country Songs)". Billboard.
  6. ^ "RPM Top 100 Country Tracks of 1992". RPM. December 19, 1992. Retrieved August 15, 2013.

External links[edit]