Everybody Hurts

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"Everybody Hurts"
R.E.M. - Everybody Hurts.jpg
Single by R.E.M.
from the album Automatic for the People
B-side"Mandolin Strum"
ReleasedApril 5, 1993 (1993-04-05)[1]
Recorded1992
Genre
Length
  • 5:20 (album version)
  • 4:57 (edit)
  • 4:46 (alternate edit)
LabelWarner Bros.
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
R.E.M. singles chronology
"The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite"
(1993)
"Everybody Hurts"
(1993)
"Nightswimming"
(1993)
Music video
"Everybody Hurts" on YouTube

"Everybody Hurts" is a song by American rock band R.E.M., originally released on the band's 1992 album Automatic for the People and also released as a single in April 1993. It peaked at number 29 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and reached the top 10 on the charts of Australia, Canada, France, Iceland, the Netherlands, the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. In 2003, Q magazine ranked "Everybody Hurts" at number 31 in their list of the "1001 Best Songs Ever".[4] In 2005, Blender ranked the song at number 238 in their list of "Greatest Songs Since You Were Born".[5]

Background[edit]

Much of the song was written by drummer Bill Berry, although as R.E.M. share songwriting credits among its members, it is unknown how much he actually wrote.[6] Berry's drums are largely absent from the song—a Univox drum machine took his place—but he was responsible for the sampling of the drum pattern on the track. The string arrangement was written by Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones.

Guitarist Peter Buck commented on the making of the track, saying:

"Everybody Hurts" is similar to "Man on the Moon". Bill brought it in, and it was a one-minute long country-and-western song. It didn't have a chorus or a bridge. It had the verse... it kind of went around and around, and he was strumming it. We went through about four different ideas and how to approach it and eventually came to that Stax, Otis Redding, "Pain in My Heart" kind of vibe. I'm not sure if Michael would have copped that reference, but to a lot of our fans it was a Staxxy-type thing. It took us forever to figure out the arrangement and who was going to play what, and then Bill ended up not playing on the original track. It was me and Mike and a drum machine. And then we all overdubbed.[7]

In the liner notes of the album In Time: The Best of R.E.M. 1988–2003, Buck writes that "the reason the lyrics are so atypically straightforward is because it was aimed at teenagers", and "I've never watched Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but the idea that high school is a portal to hell seems pretty realistic to me." Incidentally, the song was used in the 1992 film of the same name that preceded the show.

In 2005, Buck told the BBC: "If you're consciously writing for someone who hasn't been to college, or is pretty young, it might be nice to be very direct. In that regard, it's tended to work for people of a lot of ages."[8]

Michael Stipe had originally intended for Patti Smith to be a second vocal on the track, but it did not work out.[9]

Critical reception[edit]

The song received favorable reviews from most music critics. AllMusic editor Stephen Thomas Erlewine wrote that it has "a comforting melancholy".[10] David Bauder from The Associated Press said that it keeps "the pace slow and the mood melancholy."[11] Larry Flick from Billboard called it a "spare, honest, and emotional track", adding "when the strings kick in, there's no denying this song's power."[12] Bevan Hannah from The Canberra Times noted "the smoothly caressing guitar".[13] Another editor, Larry McShane described it as "haunting".[14] Randy Clark from Cashbox said it is the "strongest" cut of the album.[15] Another editor, Troy J. Augusto felt that it "might be a hard sell at radio, given the somber mood and suicide related theme". He complimented the singer's "silky vocals and the song's lush string section [that] provide this track's main appeal."[16] Also Justin Wilson from The Cavalier Daily said it is "the best song on the album, one of R.E.M.'s best songs ever". He noted it as "emotionally moving"[17] and "deeply affecting".[18] Greg Kot from Chicago Tribune stated that it is "a ballad that would border on the maudlin if Stipe didn't sing it with such conviction".[19] Greg Sandow from Entertainment Weekly wrote,

"The record's biggest surprise, however, is its one surefire pop hit, "Everybody Hurts", an almost unbearably passionate argument against suicide. It sounds like a gigantic arena transfiguration of a '50s rock ballad, with Stipe's voice pleading over triplets and massed strings, and surely will be played on radio for generations to come, right next to unforgettable anthems like "Bridge Over Troubled Water"."[20]

Ron Fell from the Gavin Report said that Stipe's "powerful and emotional life-affirming message comes across very clear." He chose it as "a favorite track" from the album.[21] A reviewer from The Gazette commented that Automatic for the People ponders frustrations of life in the "Bee Geeish" "Everybody Hurts"".[22] Music writer James Masterton wrote in his weekly UK chart commentary, that it is "the most beautiful and moving track on the album" and "just a reflection of how the band can do no wrong at present."[23] Pan-European magazine Music & Media described it as an "ultra melancholic ballad", noting that with string arrangements by ex Led Zeppelin bass player John Paul Jones, it is "the Bridge Over Troubled Water for the '90s with Michael Stipe as Simon & Garfunkel rolled into one."[24] Alan Jones from Music Week deemed it "a torchy ballad, with Stipe's fragile and waivering vocal offset at times by discreet strings." He also viewed it as "radio-friendly".[25] People Magazine's reviewer stated that here, the vocalist "succeeds at talking a friend out of suicide".[26] Scripps Howard News Service wrote that the singer "has never sung better" and noted that "the unabashedly emotional" track "gives him plenty of range to display those pipes."[27] David Cavanagh from Select said that it is "virtually beyond words." He added, "It will have non-REM maniacs in hysterics with its delicate Spector structure and childlike message ("everybody hurts, everybody cries...when you think you've had too much of this life, hang on..."). It will make everyone else cry. It really is that straightforward."[28]

Music video[edit]

In the video for the song, directed by Jake Scott and filmed along the double deck portions of I-10 near the I-35 Interchange in downtown San Antonio, Texas in February 1993, the band is stuck in a traffic jam. It shows the people in other cars and subtitles of their thoughts appear on screen. A man standing on an overpass drops pages from a book he is reading onto the cars below, while the subtitles read "Lead me to the rock that is higher than I" and "They that sow in tears shall reap in joy", quotes from the biblical Book of Psalms 61 and 126 respectively. At the end, all the people leave their cars and walk instead; then they vanish, followed by scenes of a newscast reporting on the unusual event. Although Michael Stipe is featured prominently in the video, he remains silent until the final "Hold On, Hold On" part of the song. The video was heavily inspired by the traffic jam in the opening dream sequence of Fellini's .

The music video for "Everybody Hurts" was published on R.E.M.'s official YouTube channel in October 2009. The video has amassed more than 102 million views as of September 2021.[29]

Usage in media[edit]

In 1995, British emotional support listening service The Samaritans, in response to the high suicide rate but low crisis service take-up amongst young men, launched a UK press advertising campaign consisting solely of the lyrics to "Everybody Hurts" and the charity's hotline number.[30]

The song was placed on R.E.M.'s Warner Bros. "best of" album In Time: The Best of R.E.M. 1988–2003 in 2003. It was one of four songs from Automatic for the People to make the compilation, more than from any other album. The song is included on R.E.M. Live.

U.S. President Donald Trump used the song in a Twitter video showing several Democratic politicians with sad-looking reactions towards his 2019 State of the Union Address. The former members of the band responded to this on their Twitter page saying, "World Leader PRETEND!!! Congress, Media--ghost this faker!!! Love, R.E.M." Eventually, Twitter removed the video following a copyright complaint from Concord Music, the band's record label. Trump later re-uploaded the video, using Lee Greenwood's "God Bless the U.S.A." instead. Both versions of the video were created by a self-proclaimed Trump supporter named @CarpeDonktum.[31][32]

The song closes the fifth and final episode of the Channel 4 series It's a Sin.

A cover version of the song appears in The Addams Family, sung by Lurch to reflect the situation each of the Addams family members were going through.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Bill Berry, Peter Buck, Mike Mills and Michael Stipe unless otherwise indicated.

Charts and certifications[edit]

Helping Haiti charity single[edit]

"Everybody Hurts"
Everybody Hurts (Haiti).png
Single by Helping Haiti
ReleasedFebruary 7, 2010
RecordedJanuary 2010
Genre
Length5:26
LabelSyco
Songwriter(s)
  • Bill Berry
  • Peter Buck
  • Mike Mills
  • Michael Stipe
Producer(s)
Leona Lewis singles chronology
"I Got You"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Collide"
(2011)
Rod Stewart singles chronology
"My Cherie Amour"
(2010)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"I've Got You Under My Skin"
(2010)
Mariah Carey singles chronology
"Angels Cry / Up Out My Face"
(2010)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Oh Santa!"
(2010)
Cheryl singles chronology
"3 Words"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Parachute"
(2010)
Mika singles chronology
"Kick Ass (We Are Young)"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Blame It on the Girls"
(2010)
Michael Buble singles chronology
"Baby (You've Got What It Takes)"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Crazy Love"
(2010)
Joe McElderry singles chronology
"The Climb"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Ambitions"
(2010)
Miley Cyrus singles chronology
"Party in the U.S.A."
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"When I Look at You"
(2010)
James Blunt singles chronology
"Primavera in anticipo (It Is My Song)"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Stay the Night"
(2010)
Take That singles chronology
"Hold Up a Light"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"The Flood"
(2010)
Jon Bon Jovi singles chronology
"Bang a Drum"
(1998)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Not Running Anymore"
(2012)
James Morrison singles chronology
"Get to You"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"I Won't Let You Go"
(2010)
Alexandra Burke singles chronology
"Broken Heels"
(2010)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"All Night Long"
(2010)
Susan Boyle singles chronology
"I Dreamed a Dream"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Perfect Day"
(2010)
JLS singles chronology
"Everybody in Love"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"One Shot"
(2010)
Westlife singles chronology
"What About Now"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Safe"
(2010)
Kylie Minogue singles chronology
"Lhuna"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"All the Lovers"
(2010)
Robbie Williams singles chronology
"You Know Me"
(2009)
"Everybody Hurts"
(2010)
"Morning Sun"
(2010)
Music video
"Everybody Hurts" on YouTube

In an attempt to raise money for victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown asked Simon Cowell to arrange a charity single.[62] Cowell chose "Everybody Hurts". Brown agreed to waive VAT on the single, and R.E.M. agreed to waive all royalties.[63] The release would be under the name Helping Haiti.

Proceeds from the single were to be split between The Sun's Helping Haiti fund and the Disasters Emergency Committee.[62][64] The single was released digitally on February 7, 2010, and physically on February 8, 2010.[citation needed]

Reportedly, the single's sales in the UK were approximately 205,000 copies in its first two days[65] and 453,000 in its first week, making it the fastest-selling charity record of the 21st century in Britain.[66]

This cover is also noteworthy for featuring Robbie Williams' first collaboration with Take That since Williams parted ways with the group in 1995, although neither act was present for each other's recording session.

This release also marks Jon Bon Jovi's first No. 1 appearance on the UK Singles Chart.[67]

Artists[edit]

The song is performed by the following artists (in order of appearance):

Chart performance for Helping Haiti version[edit]

Following its February 7, 2010, release in the UK and Ireland, Helping Haiti's song entered the Irish Singles Chart on February 12 at No. 1. It entered the UK Singles Chart on February 14 at No. 1, spending two weeks at the top spot before dropping to No. 9. The single debuted on the Australian Singles Chart on February 23 at No. 28.

Music video for Helping Haiti version[edit]

A five-minute promotional short documentary was broadcast on ITV at 20.30 on February 7, 2010. The documentary includes "behind the scenes" footage of the featured performers (except for Carey, Cyrus, Bon Jovi, and Minogue) recording their vocals intercut with real-world images and footage from the earthquake aftermath,[68] opening with a statement of what happened on January 12, 2010, and continuing with footage showing the devastation in the country and the suffering of the Haitians.[69] The official music video, directed by Joseph Kahn, premiered on March 6, 2010. Jon Bon Jovi and Michael Bublé are the only featured artists not to appear in this video.

Track listing for Helping Haiti version[edit]

  1. "Everybody Hurts" – 5:24
  2. "Everybody Hurts" (alternative mix) – 5:35

Charts for Helping Haiti version[edit]

Weekly charts for Helping Haiti version[edit]

Weekly sales chart peaks for "Everybody Hurts"
Chart (2010) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[70] 28
Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40)[71] 23
Belgium (Ultratip Flanders)[72] 1
Belgium (Ultratip Wallonia)[73] 1
Canada (Canadian Hot 100)[74] 59
Germany (Official German Charts)[75] 16
Ireland (IRMA)[41] 1
Italy Digital Download (FIMI)[76] 14
Netherlands (Dutch Top 40 Tipparade)[77] 5
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[78] 17
Scotland (OCC)[79] 1
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[80] 39
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[81] 21
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[82] 16
UK Singles (OCC)[83] 1
US Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles (Billboard)[84] 21

Year-end charts for Helping Haiti version[edit]

Annual sales chart position for "Everybody Hurts"
Chart (2010) Position
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[85] 11

Certifications for Helping Haiti version[edit]

Sales certifications for "Everybody Hurts"
Region Certification Certified units/sales
United Kingdom (BPI)[86] Platinum 600,000^

^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New Releases: Singles" (PDF). Music Week. 3 April 1993. p. 17. Retrieved 21 June 2021.
  2. ^ Kumari, Kayla (25 November 2019). "'The Voice': Top 11 Perform Songs Chosen by Fans". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  3. ^ SPIN Media LLC (November 1992). SPIN. SPIN Media LLC. p. 62. 08863032.
  4. ^ "Q - 1001 best songs ever (2003)".
  5. ^ "Blender Magazine: Greatest Songs Since You Were Born". Archived from the original on 7 January 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2020.
  6. ^ Bowler, David (1995). R.E.M. from "Chronic Town to "Monster". New York: Carol Publishing Group. p. 88. ISBN 0-8065-1724-7.
  7. ^ "Peter on 'Everybody Hurts'". Retrieved 9 November 2011.
  8. ^ Connor, Alan (27 January 2010). "What's Haiti single and REM song Everybody Hurts about?". Smashed Hits (column). BBC News. Retrieved 11 September 2020.
  9. ^ Transcript from Stipe's AOL chat in July 1994
  10. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "R.E.M. - Automatic for the People". AllMusic. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  11. ^ Bauder, David (1 November 1992). "R.E.M. takes a somber turn on latest album". The Associated Press. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  12. ^ Flick, Larry (11 September 1993). "Single Reviews" (PDF). Billboard. p. 53. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
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  15. ^ Clark, Randy (17 October 1992). "Music Reviews: Albums - Pick Of The Week" (PDF). Cashbox. p. 5. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
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  18. ^ Wilson, Justin (21 January 1993). "'Lucky Town' tops list of year's best". The Cavalier Daily. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
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  30. ^ "The facts of life: heartbreak". The Independent. London. 24 September 2008. Archived from the original on 2 January 2009. Retrieved 16 August 2010.
  31. ^ Vozick-Levinson, Simon (15 February 2019). "R.E.M. Rebuke Trump: 'Ghost This Faker!'". Rolling Stone.
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  33. ^ a b Performed on Mountain Stage on April 28, 1991.
  34. ^ Recorded at the Fox Theater, Atlanta, Georgia; November 13, 1989.
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  60. ^ "Italian single certifications – R.E.M. – Everybody Hurts" (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Retrieved 13 July 2019. Select "2018" in the "Anno" drop-down menu. Select "Everybody Hurts" in the "Filtra" field. Select "Singoli" under "Sezione".
  61. ^ "British single certifications – REM – Everybody Hurts". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 8 March 2021.
  62. ^ a b "X Factor Simon Cowell Earthquake Charity Single To Be REM's Everybody Hurts, Sky Sources Say". Sky News. January 22, 2010. Archived from the original on January 25, 2010. Retrieved January 25, 2010.
  63. ^ "Haiti all-star charity single gets first airplay". BBC News. 2 February 2010. Retrieved 2 February 2010.
  64. ^ "Mariah Carey joins line-up for Haiti charity single". BBC News. 26 January 2010. Retrieved 26 January 2010.
  65. ^ Cowell Haiti single hits 200,000 sales from Music Week
  66. ^ Haiti charity single tops UK chart from BBC
  67. ^ "Bon Jovi". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 7 October 2018.
  68. ^ "Video premiere for Haiti charity single". BBC News. 8 February 2001. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  69. ^ Everybody Hurts Haiti Charity video from BBC
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External links[edit]