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Created by Kendra Wiseman, Astra Woodcraft, and Jenna Miscavige Hill
Website exscientologykids.com
Launched 2008

Exscientologykids.com is a website launched in 2008 by Kendra Wiseman, Astra Woodcraft and Jenna Miscavige Hill.[3][4] It is dedicated to publishing affidavits of former child members of the Church of Scientology.[1]

The website makes numerous allegations against the Church of Scientology, including that they deprive children of a proper education and that church members engage in physical abuse against children.[3][1][2][5] The website's founders also provide safe houses to members who have recently left the church.[1] These safe houses also provide services for reuniting families and helping ex-members with financial difficulties.[1] The Church of Scientology has made numerous official statements regarding the content of the site, including statements from spokesperson Vicki Dunstan, who is reported as saying that the website was full of lies.[2][6]


  1. ^ a b c d e Mike Parker (April 6, 2008). "A wholly unorthodox attack on Scientology". Sunday Express. pp. 60–61. 
  2. ^ a b c "Growing Up Scientologist" , Terry Moran, Nightline, ABC, aired April 25, 2008

    "Ex-Scientology Kids Share Their Stories", Lisa Fletcher, Ethan Nelson & Maggie Burbank, Nightline, ABC, April 24, 2008

  3. ^ a b David Sarno (March 3, 2008). "Web awash in critics of Scientology; The church's tightly controlled image is taking hits as soured ex-members go online". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 14, 2010. 

    Full-text reprint: David Sarno (March 5, 2008). "Anti-Scientology sentiment grows, especially on Internet". The Seattle Times. Retrieved January 6, 2011. 

  4. ^ Hill, Jenna Miscavige; Pulitzer, Lisa (2013). Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape. William Morrow. pp. 379–380. ISBN 978-0-06-224847-3. 
  5. ^ "ABCs Dateline Takes a Look Inside The Evils Of Scientology". Glosslip blog. Technorati. October 23, 2009. Archived from the original on November 14, 2012. Retrieved January 1, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Church vs slate". Messenger - Eastern Courier. Adelaide, Australia: Nationwide News Pty Limited. July 9, 2008. p. 023. 

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