Expedition 39

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ISS Expedition 39
Mission typeISS Expedition
Expedition
Space StationInternational Space Station
Began10 March 2014 (2014-03-10Z) UTC
Ended13 May 2014 (2014-05-14Z) UTC
Arrived aboardSoyuz TMA-11M
Soyuz TMA-12M
Departed aboardSoyuz TMA-11M
Soyuz TMA-12M
Crew
Crew size6
MembersExpedition 38/39:
Koichi Wakata
Richard A. Mastracchio
Mikhail Tyurin

Expedition 39/40:
Aleksandr Skvortsov
Oleg Artemyev
Steven R. Swanson
ISS Expedition 39 Patch.svg Expedition 39 crew portrait.jpg
(l-r) Artemyev, Swanson, Skvortsov, Tyurin, Wakata and Mastracchio

Expedition 39 was the 39th expedition to the International Space Station. It marked the first time the ISS had been under command of a Japanese astronaut, space veteran Koichi Wakata. After Expedition 21 in 2009 and Expedition 35 in 2013, it was only the third time an ISS-crew is led neither by a NASA nor a RSA crew member.

During Expedition 39, Astronauts Mastracchio and Swanson installed the "Veggie" project on the International Space Station.[1]

Crew[edit]

Position First Part
(March 2014)
Second Part
(March 2014 to May 2014)
Commander Japan Koichi Wakata, JAXA
Fourth and last spaceflight
Flight Engineer 1 United States Richard A. Mastracchio, NASA
Fourth and last spaceflight
Flight Engineer 2 Russia Mikhail Tyurin, RSA
Third and last spaceflight
Flight Engineer 3 Russia Aleksandr Skvortsov, RSA
Second spaceflight
Flight Engineer 4 Russia Oleg Artemyev, RSA
First spaceflight
Flight Engineer 5 United States Steven R. Swanson, NASA
Third and last spaceflight
Source
JAXA,[2] NASA,[3] ESA[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Herridge, Linda (16 May 2014). "Veggie Plant Growth System Activated on International Space Station". NASA. Retrieved 18 January 2016.
  2. ^ "Astronaut Koichi Wakata Selected as Member of ISS Expedition Crew". JAXA. Retrieved 2011-02-17.
  3. ^ "NASA And Partners Name Upcoming Space Station Crew Members". NASA. Retrieved 2011-02-19.
  4. ^ "ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst to fly to Space Station in 2014". ESA. Retrieved 2011-09-28.

External links[edit]