Extreme Memory Tournament

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Memory League is a memory training and competition platform[1] originally founded and created by Nelson Dellis and Simon Orton under the name Extreme Memory Tournament (XMT).[2]

Memory League differs from traditional memory competitions in the fact that it is entirely digital, has head-to-head matches, and is composed of shorter disciplines. The five disciplines are one-minute memorization of names, words, images, numbers, and cards.[3]

The first three world championships took place in San Diego, California in 2014, 2015, and 2016. The structure of the competition saw 24 of the World's top memorizers, including Alex Mullen (USA),[4] Johannes Mallow (Germany), Simon Reinhard, Boris Konrad (Germany), Andi Bell (UK), Ben Pridmore (UK), Jonas von Essen (Sweden), and Yanjaa compete for up to USD $75,000 in prize money per championship over the course of three days.

2014 World Championship[edit]

The 2014 world championship took place on April 26–27.[5][6][7]

2014 Winners[edit]

The 2014 winners of the world championship were:[8]

2015 World Championship[edit]

Mnemonists from seven countries competed in over 45 rounds on May 2–3, 2016.[9][10][11] The competition was won by Johannes Mallow.[12][13]

2015 Winners[edit]

The 2015 winners of the world championship were:[14]

2016 World Championship[edit]

The 2016 world championship took place on June 24–26 and was an IAM-ranked competition.[15][16]

2016 Winners[edit]

The 2016 winners of the world championship were:[17][18]

Online Memory League Championship[edit]

There is also a regular, seasonal, Online Memory League Championship.[19][20][21][22]

Other Memory League Championships[edit]

Other Memory League championships have included:

  • 2019 Scandinavia Open Memory League Championship[23]
  • 2018 Japan Memory League Championship[24][25][26]
  • 2018 Egypt Kids Memory League Championship[27]
  • 2018 Egypt Junior Memory League Championship[28]
  • 2018 Scandinavian Open Memory League Championship[29]
  • 2018 Canada Junior Memory League Championship[30]
  • 2017 Scandinavian Open Memory League Championship[31]
  • 2017 German Open Memory League Championship[32]
  • 2017 UK Open Memory League Championship[33]
  • 2016 UK Memory League Championship[34]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Why Memory Competitions Aren’t Memorable
  2. ^ Memory League Championships
  3. ^ The science behind the best memorisers in the world
  4. ^ Lessons from America's First Memory World Champions
  5. ^ Remembering, as an Extreme Sport
  6. ^ Man With World's Strongest Memory Crusades Against Alzheimer's
  7. ^ Lawyer wins memory tournament; what are the secrets of success?
  8. ^ 2014 XMT Finals
  9. ^ Extreme Memory Tournament: meet the Mongolian masters of the mnemonic
  10. ^ Extreme Memory Tournament 2015
  11. ^ Extreme Memory Tournament
  12. ^ The science behind the best memorisers in the world
  13. ^ World’s best compete with memory ‘palaces’
  14. ^ 2015 XMT Finals
  15. ^ XMT 2016: World’s top memory athletes to compete June 24-26
  16. ^ The Extreme Memory Tournament 2016
  17. ^ 2016 XMT Finals
  18. ^ Mongolia conquers Extreme Memory Tournament 2016
  19. ^ Online Memory League Championship
  20. ^ Memory League, Season 4
  21. ^ Online Memory League Championship, Season 4
  22. ^ Online Memory League Championship, season 5
  23. ^ 2019 Scandinavia Open Memory League Championship
  24. ^ 2018 Japan Memory League Championship
  25. ^ 2018 Japan Memory League Championship Discussion
  26. ^ 2018 Japan Memory League Championship Webpage
  27. ^ 2018 Egypt Kids Memory League Championship
  28. ^ 2018 Egypt Junior Memory League Championship
  29. ^ 2018 Scandinavian Open Memory League Championship
  30. ^ 2018 Canada Junior Memory League Championship
  31. ^ 2017 Scandinavian Open Memory League Championship
  32. ^ 2017 German Open Memory League Championship
  33. ^ 2017 UK Open Memory League Championship
  34. ^ 2016 UK Memory League Championship