Extreme points of North America

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North America

This is a list of the extreme points of North America: the points that are highest and lowest, and farther north, south, east or west than any other location on the continent. Some of these points are debatable, given the varying definitions of North America.

North America and surrounding islands[edit]

Continental North America[edit]

Highest points[edit]

Lowest points[edit]

Other points[edit]

Islands[edit]

Lakes[edit]

Rivers[edit]

Extreme points of North American countries[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Pico de Orizaba is the highest point of Estado Libre y Soberano de Puebla, Estado Libre y Soberano de Veracruz de Ignacio de la Llave, and all of México
  2. ^ The summit of Grays Peak is the highest point of the Front Range and the Continental Divide of North America.
  3. ^ The summit elevation of Grays Peak includes an adjustment of +1.881 m (+6.2 ft) from NGVD 29 to NAVD 88.
  4. ^ Volcán Tajumulco is the highest point of the Republic of Guatemala and all of Central America. Volcán Tajumulco is the southernmost and easternmost 4000 m (13,123-foot) summit of North America
  5. ^ Gunnbjørn Fjeld is the highest point on the Island of Greenland, Kalaallit Nunaat, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the entire Arctic
  6. ^ Pico Duarte is the highest point on the Island of Hispaniola, the Dominican Republic, and all the islands of the Caribbean Sea

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mark Newell; Blaine Horner (September 2, 2015). "New Elevation for Nation's Highest Peak" (Press release). USGS. Retrieved September 26, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Pico de Orizaba". Summits of the World. peakbagger.com. Retrieved September 8, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Grays Peak". NGS Station Datasheet. United States National Geodetic Survey. Retrieved September 8, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Grays Peak". Summits of the World. peakbagger.com. Retrieved September 8, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Volcán Tajumulco". Summits of the World. peakbagger.com. Retrieved January 11, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Gunnbjørn Fjeld". Summits of the World. peakbagger.com. Retrieved September 8, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Pico Duarte". Summits of the World. peakbagger.com. Retrieved January 2, 2010. 
  8. ^ "USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 meter Downloadable Data Collection from The National Map 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) National Elevation Data Set (NED)". United States Geological Survey. September 21, 2015. Retrieved September 22, 2015. 
  9. ^ Furnace Creek in Death Valley, California, United States set the world record for the highest reliably reported ambient air temperature of 134 °F (56.7 °C) on July 10, 1913. This record has been eclipsed only once by a questionable reading of 136 °F (57.8 °C) recorded in 'Aziziya, Libya, on September 13, 1922.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 48°10′N 100°10′W / 48.167°N 100.167°W / 48.167; -100.167 (North America)