Eye of the Beholder III: Assault on Myth Drannor

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Eye of the Beholder III:
Assault on Myth Drannor
Eye of the Beholder III cover.png
DOS Cover art
Developer(s) Strategic Simulations
Publisher(s) Strategic Simulations
Ving Co., Ltd. (FM Towns, PC-98)
Producer(s) Nicholas Beliaeff
Programmer(s) John Miles
Series Eye of the Beholder
Platform(s) DOS, FM-Towns, PC-98
Release 1993 (DOS)
1994 (PC-98)
1995 (FM Towns)
Genre(s) Role-playing
Mode(s) Single-player

Eye of the Beholder III: Assault on Myth Drannor is a 1993 role-playing video game and the sequel to Eye of the Beholder and Eye of the Beholder II: The Legend of Darkmoon.

Plot[edit]

After defeating Dran the heroes tell the patrons of a local tavern about their success over Dran Draggore and how it saved the town. After that, a mysterious man enters the tavern and asks the heroes to save the ruined city, Myth Drannor, which is ruled by a Lich named Acwellan. The man then tells the heroes that they need to save Myth Drannor by getting an ancient artifact from the Lich known as the Codex. After the heroes accept the quest, the mysterious man teleports the heroes just outside Myth Drannor.

The explorable areas include the forest around the city, the mausoleum, and finally the city ruins including a mage guild and a temple.

Gameplay[edit]

Despite employing an updated version of the engine, interesting and oft-unique NPC selection and welcome gameplay tweaks such as an 'All Attack' button and the ability to use polearms from second rank, it was not well received.

Development[edit]

Eye of the Beholder III: Assault on Myth Drannor was not developed by Westwood, the developer of Eye of the Beholder and The Legend of Darkmoon, but rather in-house by the publisher SSI. The third game was not written by Westwood, who had been acquired by Virgin Interactive in 1992 and created the Lands of Lore series instead.

Reception[edit]

SSI sold 50,664 copies of Eye of the Beholder III.[1] GameSpy commented that "Eye of the Beholder III was a classic example of a company churning out a quick sequel to a good game and simply not giving it the love and care it really deserves".[2] Computer Gaming World's Scorpia wrote of Eye of the Beholder III: Assault on Myth Drannor that since the game "is the closeout of the EOB series, one would expect it to be on the spectacular side. Unfortunately, for several reasons, that isn't the case". She stated that the graphics were inferior to the previous games', that "Aurally, the game is a nightmare", and that the "big fight at the end is a letdown". Scorpia concluded that "Assault on Myth Drannor is a disappointment ... [it] just doesn't stack up against the previous two games. What started as a series with great promise has, alas, ended on a mediocre note".[3] She later called the game "dreary" with a "letdown" of an ending, and "only for the hard-core EOB player. (Note: Westwood had nothing to do with it.)"[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maher, Jimmy (2017-03-31). "Opening the Gold Box, Part 5: All That Glitters is Not Gold". The Digital Antiquarian. 
  2. ^ Rausch, Allen (17 August 2004). "A History of D&D Video Games - Part III". Game Spy. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Scorpia (August 1993). "Eye of the Beholder III: Hit or Myth-Demeanor?". Computer Gaming World. p. 66. Retrieved 12 July 2014. 
  4. ^ Scorpia (October 1993). "Scorpia's Magic Scroll Of Games". Computer Gaming World. pp. 34–50. Retrieved 25 March 2016.