Ezzard Charles

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Ezzard Charles
Ezzard Charles 2.jpg
Charles in his prime in 1950
Statistics
Real nameEzzard Mack Charles
Nickname(s)
  • Cincinnati Cobra
Weight(s)
Height6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Reach73 in (185 cm)
Born(1921-07-07)July 7, 1921
Lawrenceville, Georgia, U.S.
DiedMay 28, 1975(1975-05-28) (aged 53)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
StanceOrthodox
Boxing record
Total fights121
Wins95
Wins by KO52
Losses25
Draws1
Medal record
Men's amateur boxing
Cincinnati Golden Gloves
Bronze medal – third place 1937 Cincinnati Welterweight
Gold medal – first place 1938 Cincinnati Welterweight
Gold medal – first place 1939 Cincinnati Middleweight
Chicago Golden Gloves
Gold medal – first place 1939 Chicago Middleweight
Ohio District AAU Championships
Gold medal – first place 1937 Cincinnati Welterweight
Gold medal – first place 1938 Cincinnati Welterweight
Gold medal – first place 1939 Cincinnati Middleweight
National AAU Championships
Gold medal – first place 1939 San Francisco Middleweight

Ezzard Mack Charles (July 7, 1921 – May 28, 1975), known as the Cincinnati Cobra, was an American professional boxer and World Heavyweight Champion. Known for his slick defense and precision, he is often considered the greatest light heavyweight boxer of all time.[1] Charles defeated numerous Hall of Fame fighters in three different weight classes. Charles retired with a record of 95 wins, 25 losses and 1 draw. He was posthumously inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 1990.[2]

Career[edit]

Charles was born in Lawrenceville, Georgia, and grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio.[3] Charles graduated from Woodward High School in Cincinnati where he was already becoming a well-known fighter.[4] Known as "The Cincinnati Cobra", Charles fought many notable opponents in both the light heavyweight and heavyweight divisions, eventually winning the World Championship in the latter. Although he never won the Light Heavyweight title, The Ring has rated him as the greatest light heavyweight of all time.[5]

Career beginnings and military service[edit]

Charles started his career as a featherweight in the amateurs, where he had a record of 42–0. In 1938, he won the Diamond Belt Middleweight Championship. He followed this up in 1939 by winning the Chicago Golden Gloves tournament of champions. He won the national AAU Middleweight Championship in 1939. He turned professional in 1940, knocking out Melody Johnson in the fourth round. Charles won all of his first 17 fights before being defeated by veteran Ken Overlin. Victories over future Hall of Famers Teddy Yarosz and the much avoided Charley Burley had started to solidify Charles as a top contender in the middleweight division. However, he served in the U.S. military during World War II and was unable to fight professionally in 1945.

World heavyweight champion[edit]

He returned to boxing after the war as a light heavyweight, picking up many notable wins over leading light heavyweights, as well as heavyweight contenders Archie Moore, Jimmy Bivins, Lloyd Marshall and Elmer Ray. Shortly after his knock-out of Moore in their third and final meeting, tragedy struck. Charles fought a young contender named Sam Baroudi, knocking him out in Round 10. Baroudi died of the injuries he sustained in this bout. Charles was so devastated he almost gave up fighting. Charles was unable to secure a title shot at light heavyweight and moved up to heavyweight. After knocking out Joe Baksi and Johnny Haynes, Charles won the vacant National Boxing Association Heavyweight title when he outpointed Jersey Joe Walcott over 15 rounds on June 22, 1949. The following year, he outpointed his idol and former World Heavyweight Champion Joe Louis to become the recognized Lineal Champion. Successful defenses against Walcott, Lee Oma and Joey Maxim followed.

Charles vs. Marciano[edit]

In 1951, Charles fought Walcott a third time and lost the title by knockout in the seventh round. Charles lost a controversial decision in their fourth and final bout. If Charles had won this fight, he would have become the first man in history to regain the heavyweight championship. Remaining a top contender with wins over Rex Layne, Tommy Harrison and Coley Wallace, Charles knocked out Bob Satterfield in an eliminator bout for the right to challenge Heavyweight Champion Rocky Marciano. His two stirring battles with Marciano are regarded as ring classics. In the first bout, held in Yankee Stadium on June 17, 1954, he valiantly took Marciano the distance, going down on points in a vintage heavyweight bout. Charles is the only man ever to last the full 15-round distance against Marciano. Marciano won a unanimous decision. Referee Ruby Goldstein scored the bout 8-5-2 in rounds for the champion. Judge Artie Aidala scored the fight 9-5-1 while judge Harold Barnes' tally was 8-6-1. Nevertheless, a number of fans and boxing writers felt that Charles deserved the decision.[6] In their September rematch, Charles landed a severe blow that actually split Marciano's nose in half. Marciano's cornermen were unable to stop the bleeding and the referee almost halted the contest until Marciano rallied with an eighth-round knockout.

Later career[edit]

Like many boxers, financial problems forced Charles to continue fighting, losing 13 of his final 23 fights. He retired with a record of 93-25-1 (52 KOs).

Personal[edit]

Charles was very close with Rocky Marciano and a neighbor and friend of Muhammad Ali when they both lived on 85th Street in Chicago.[7] Charles also starred in one motion picture: Mau Mau Drums, an independent (and unreleased) jungle-adventure film shot in and around Cincinnati in 1960 by filmmaker Earl Schwieterman.

Death[edit]

Charles' grave at Burr Oak Cemetery

In 1968, Charles was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The disease affected Charles' legs and eventually left him completely disabled. A fund raiser was held to assist Charles and many of his former opponents spoke on his behalf. Rocky Marciano in particular called Charles the bravest man he ever fought. The former boxer spent his last days in a nursing home. A chilling 1973 commercial showed Charles in his wheelchair horribly disabled by ALS.[8][citation needed] Charles died on May 28, 1975, in Chicago.[9] He was buried at Burr Oak Cemetery in Alsip, Illinois.

Legacy[edit]

Commemorative stamp honoring Charles

In 1976, Cincinnati honored Charles by changing the name of Lincoln Park Drive to Ezzard Charles Drive. This was the street of his residence during the height of his career.[10]

In 2002, Charles was ranked No. 13 on The Ring magazine's list of the 80 Best Fighters of the Last 80 Years.

In 2006, Ezzard Charles was named the 11th greatest fighter of all time by the IBRO (International Boxing Research Organisation).[11]

The "Cincinnati Cobra" was a master boxer of extraordinary skill and ability. He had speed, agility, fast hands and excellent footwork. Charles possessed a masterful jab and was a superb combination puncher. He was at his peak as a light-heavyweight. His record is quite impressive. Against top rate opposition like Archie Moore, Charley Burley, Lloyd Marshall, Jimmy Bivins, and Joey Maxim he was an impressive 16-2 combined. Despite being a natural light-heavy he won the heavyweight title and made 9 successful title defenses. Nearly 25% of voters had Charles in the top 10. Half of the voters had him in the top 15. Two thirds of voters had him inside the top 20.

Muhammad Ali said in his own autobiography:

"Ezzard Charles was a truly great fighter and champion. He was the only heavyweight champion, other than a young Sonny Liston, who I think would have really troubled me at my best."[12]

In 2007, ESPN online ranks Ezzard Charles as the 27th greatest boxer of all time, ahead of such notable fighters as Mike Tyson, Larry Holmes and Jake LaMotta.[13]

In 2009, Boxing magazine listed Ezzard Charles as the greatest Light Heavyweight fighter ever, ahead of the likes of Archie Moore, Bob Foster, Michael Spinks and Gene Tunney.[14]

In 2022, a statue honoring Ezzard Charles was unveiled in Laurel Park Cincinnati, OH.

Prominent boxing historian Bert Sugar listed Charles as the seventh greatest Heavyweight of all time.

Professional boxing record[edit]

121 fights 95 wins 25 losses
By knockout 52 7
By decision 43 17
By disqualification 0 1
Draws 1
No. Result Record Opponent Type Round, time Date Location Notes
121 Loss 95–25–1 Alvin Green UD 10 Sep 1, 1959 Municipal Auditorium, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S.
120 Loss 95–24–1 George Logan KO 8 (10), 1:50 Jul 30, 1959 Fairgrounds Arena, Boise, Idaho, U.S.
119 Win 95–23–1 Dave Ashley TKO 9 (10) Jul 3, 1959 Lincoln Heights High School, Lincoln Heights, California, U.S.
118 Loss 94–23–1 Donnie Fleeman KO 6 (10), 2:13 Oct 27, 1958 Dallas Memorial Auditorium, Dallas, Texas, U.S.
117 Loss 94–22–1 Alfredo Zuany UD 10 Sep 30, 1958 Plaza de Toros, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico
116 Win 94–21–1 Johnny Harper UD 10 Aug 28, 1958 East-West Stadium, Fairmont, West Virginia, U.S.
115 Loss 93–21–1 Dick Richardson DQ 2 (10) Oct 2, 1956 Harringay Arena, London, England
114 Loss 93–20–1 Harry Matthews UD 10 Aug 31, 1956 Sick's Stadium, Seattle, Washington, U.S.
113 Loss 93–19–1 Pat McMurtry UD 10 Jul 13, 1956 Lincoln Bowl, Tacoma, Washington, U.S.
112 Win 93–18–1 Bob Albright RTD 6 (10) Jun 19, 1956 Softball Park, Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.
111 Loss 92–18–1 Wayne Bethea UD 10 May 21, 1956 St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
110 Win 92–17–1 Don Jasper TKO 9 (10), 2:46 Apr 21, 1956 Windsor Arena, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
109 Loss 91–17–1 Young Jack Johnson TKO 6 (10) Dec 29, 1955 Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
108 Win 91–16–1 Bob Albright SD 10 Dec 22, 1955 Cow Palace, Daly City, California, U.S.
107 Win 90–16–1 Toxie Hall UD 10 Dec 6, 1955 Rochester War Memorial Auditorium, Rochester, New York, U.S.
106 Loss 89–16–1 Toxie Hall SD 10 Nov 14, 1955 Rhode Island Auditorium, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.
105 Loss 89–15–1 Tommy Jackson UD 10 Aug 31, 1955 Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
104 Loss 89–14–1 Tommy Jackson UD 10 Aug 3, 1955 War Memorial Auditorium, Syracuse, New York, U.S.
103 Win 89–13–1 Paul Andrews SD 10 Jul 13, 1955 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
102 Win 88–13–1 John Holman UD 10 Jun 8, 1955 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
101 Loss 87–13–1 John Holman TKO 9 (10), 2:48 Apr 27, 1955 Miami Beach Exhibition Hall, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S.
100 Win 87–12–1 Vern Escoe KO 3 (10), 2:15 Apr 11, 1955 Edmonton Gardens, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
99 Win 86–12–1 Charley Norkus UD 10 Feb 18, 1955 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
98 Loss 85–12–1 Rocky Marciano KO 8 (15), 2:36 Sep 17, 1954 Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S. For NYSAC, NBA, and The Ring heavyweight titles
97 Loss 85–11–1 Rocky Marciano UD 15 Jun 17, 1954 Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S. For NYSAC, NBA, and The Ring heavyweight titles
96 Win 85–10–1 Bob Satterfield KO 2 (10) Jan 13, 1954 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
95 Win 84–10–1 Coley Wallace KO 10 (10), 2:43 Dec 16, 1953 San Francisco Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, California, U.S.
94 Loss 83–10–1 Harold Johnson SD 10 Sep 8, 1953 Connie Mack Stadium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
93 Loss 83–9–1 Niño Valdés UD 10 Aug 11, 1953 Miami Beach Exhibition Hall, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S.
92 Win 83–8–1 Larry Watson KO 5 (10), 2:50 May 26, 1953 Milwaukee Arena, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.
91 Win 82–8–1 Billy Gilliam UD 10 May 12, 1953 Toledo Sports Arena, Toledo, Ohio, U.S.
90 Win 81–8–1 Rex Layne UD 10 Apr 1, 1953 Winterland Arena, San Francisco, California, U.S.
89 Win 80–8–1 Tommy Harrison TKO 9 (10) Feb 4, 1953 Olympia Stadium, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
88 Win 79–8–1 Wes Bascom TKO 9 (10), 2:34 Jan 14, 1953 St. Louis Arena, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.
87 Win 78–8–1 Frank Buford TKO 7 (10), 2:13 Dec 15, 1952 Boston Garden, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
86 Win 77–8–1 Jimmy Bivins UD 10 Nov 26, 1952 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
85 Win 76–8–1 Cesar Brion UD 10 Oct 24, 1952 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
84 Win 75–8–1 Bernie Reynolds KO 2 (12), 1:40 Oct 8, 1952 Cincinnati Gardens, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
83 Loss 74–8–1 Rex Layne PTS 10 Aug 8, 1952 Ogden Stadium, Ogden, Utah, U.S.
82 Loss 74–7–1 Jersey Joe Walcott UD 15 Jun 5, 1952 Philadelphia Municipal Stadium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. For NYSAC, NBA, and The Ring heavyweight titles
81 Win 74–6–1 Joe Kahut KO 8 (12), 1:40 Dec 12, 1951 Pacific Livestock Pavilion, Portland, Oregon, U.S.
80 Win 73–6–1 Joey Maxim UD 12 Dec 12, 1951 Cow Palace, Daly City, California, U.S.
79 Win 72–6–1 Rex Layne TKO 11 (12) Oct 10, 1951 Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
78 Loss 71–6–1 Jersey Joe Walcott KO 7 (15), 0:55 Jul 18, 1951 Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. Lost NYSAC, NBA, and The Ring heavyweight titles
77 Win 71–5–1 Joey Maxim UD 15 May 30, 1951 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Retained NYSAC, NBA, and The Ring heavyweight titles
76 Win 70–5–1 Jersey Joe Walcott UD 15 Mar 7, 1951 Olympia Stadium, Detroit, Michigan, U.S. Retained NYSAC, NBA, and The Ring heavyweight titles
75 Win 69–5–1 Lee Oma TKO 10 (15), 1:19 Jan 12, 1951 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S. Retained NYSAC, NBA, and The Ring heavyweight titles
74 Win 68–5–1 Nick Barone KO 11 (15), 2:06 Dec 5, 1950 Cincinnati Gardens, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. Retained NYSAC, NBA, and The Ring heavyweight titles
73 Win 67–5–1 Joe Louis UD 15 Sep 27, 1950 Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S. Retained NBA heavyweight title;
Won vacant NYSAC and The Ring heavyweight titles
72 Win 66–5–1 Freddie Beshore TKO 14 (15), 2:53 Aug 15, 1950 Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S. Retained NBA heavyweight title
71 Win 65–5–1 Pat Valentino KO 8 (15), 0:35 Oct 14, 1949 Cow Palace, Daly City, California, U.S. Retained NBA heavyweight title
70 Win 64–5–1 Gus Lesnevich RTD 7 (15) Aug 10, 1949 Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S. Retained NBA heavyweight title
69 Win 63–5–1 Jersey Joe Walcott UD 15 Jun 22, 1949 Comiskey Park, Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Won vacant NBA heavyweight title
68 Win 62–5–1 Joey Maxim MD 15 Feb 28, 1949 Cincinnati Gardens, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
67 Win 61–5–1 Johnny Haynes KO 8 (10) Feb 7, 1949 Philadelphia Arena, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
66 Win 60–5–1 Joe Baksi TKO 11 (15), 2:33 Dec 10, 1948 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
65 Win 59–5–1 Walter Hafer KO 7 (10) Nov 15, 1948 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
64 Win 58–5–1 Jimmy Bivins UD 10 Sep 13, 1948 Griffith Stadium, Washington, D.C., U.S.
63 Win 57–5–1 Erv Sarlin UD 10 May 20, 1948 Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
62 Win 56–5–1 Elmer Ray KO 9 (10), 2:43 May 7, 1948 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
61 Win 55–5–1 Sam Baroudi KO 10 (10) Feb 20, 1948 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Baroudi died of injuries sustained in the fight.[15]
60 Win 54–5–1 Archie Moore KO 8 (15), 2:40 Jan 13, 1948 Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
59 Win 53–5–1 Fitzie Fitzpatrick KO 4 (12), 1:34 Dec 2, 1947 Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
58 Win 52–5–1 Teddy Randolph UD 10 Nov 3, 1947 Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
57 Win 51–5–1 Clarence Jones KO 1 (10), 2:41 Oct 27, 1947 Radio Center Arena, Huntington, West Virginia, U.S.
56 Win 50–5–1 Al Smith TKO 4 (10), 1:11 Oct 16, 1947 Armory, Akron, Ohio, U.S.
55 Win 49–5–1 Lloyd Marshall KO 2 (10), 2:25 Sep 29, 1947 Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
54 Win 48–5–1 Joe Matisi UD 10 Sep 16, 1947 Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
53 Loss 47–5–1 Elmer Ray SD 10 Jul 25, 1947 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
52 Win 47–4–1 Fitzie Fitzpatrick KO 5 (10), 2:43 Jul 14, 1947 Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
51 Win 46–4–1 Archie Moore MD 10 May 5, 1947 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
50 Win 45–4–1 Erv Sarlin UD 10 Apr 14, 1947 Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
49 Win 44–4–1 Jimmy Bivins KO 4 (10), 1:17 Mar 10, 1947 Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
48 Win 43–4–1 Oakland Billy Smith KO 5 (12), 1:38 Feb 17, 1947 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
47 Win 42–4–1 Jimmy Bivins UD 10 Nov 12, 1946 Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
46 Win 41–4–1 Oakland Billy Smith UD 10 Sep 23, 1946 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
45 Win 40–4–1 Lloyd Marshall KO 6 (10), 0:57 Jul 29, 1946 Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
44 Win 39–4–1 Shelton Bell KO 5 (10), 2:24 Jun 13, 1946 Idora Park, Youngstown, Ohio, U.S.
43 Win 38–4–1 Archie Moore UD 10 May 20, 1946 Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
42 Win 37–4–1 Tommy Hubert KO 4 (10), 1:49 May 13, 1946 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
41 Win 36–4–1 George Parks TKO 6 (10) Apr 15, 1946 Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
40 Win 35–4–1 Billy Duncan KO 4 (10), 1:27 Apr 1, 1946 Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
39 Win 34–4–1 Tommy Hubert UD 10 Mar 25, 1946 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
38 Win 33–4–1 Al Sheridan KO 2 (10), 2:57 Feb 18, 1946 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
37 Win 32–4–1 Al Barlow PTS 3 Dec 16, 1944 Brancaccio Theater, Esquilino, Rome, Italy Won Inter-Allied light heavyweight title
36 Win 31–4–1 Stanley Goicz PTS 3 Dec 13, 1944 Brancaccio Theater, Esquilino, Rome, Italy
35 Loss 30–4–1 Lloyd Marshall TKO 8 (10), 0:25 Mar 31, 1943 Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
34 Loss 30–3–1 Jimmy Bivins UD 10 Jan 7, 1943 Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
33 Win 30–2–1 Joey Maxim UD 10 Dec 1, 1942 Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
32 Win 29–2–1 Joey Maxim UD 10 Oct 27, 1942 Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
31 Win 28–2–1 Mose Brown KO 6 (10), 2:51 Sep 15, 1942 Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
30 Win 27–2–1 Jose Basora KO 5 (10), 2:57 Aug 17, 1942 Hickey Park, Millvale, Pennsylvania, U.S.
29 Win 26–2–1 Booker Beckwith KO 9 (10), 2:19 Jul 27, 1942 Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
28 Win 25–2–1 Steve Mamakos KO 1 (10), 2:46 Jul 14, 1942 Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
27 Win 24–2–1 Charley Burley PTS 10 Jun 29, 1942 Hickey Park, Millvale, Pennsylvania, U.S.
26 Win 23–2–1 Charley Burley UD 10 May 25, 1942 Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
25 Loss 22–2–1 Kid Tunero SD 10 May 13, 1942 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
24 Win 22–1–1 Billy Pryor PTS 10 Apr 8, 1942 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
23 Draw 21–1–1 Ken Overlin MD 10 Mar 2, 1942 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
22 Win 21–1 Anton Christoforidis TKO 3 (10), 2:42 Jan 12, 1942 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
21 Win 20–1 Teddy Yarosz UD 10 Nov 17, 1941 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
20 Win 19–1 Pat Mangini KO 1 (10), 2:50 Oct 13, 1941 Parkway Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
19 Win 18–1 Al Gilbert TKO 5 (10), 3:00 Jul 21, 1941 Parkway Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
18 Loss 17–1 Ken Overlin UD 10 Jun 9, 1941 Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
17 Win 17–0 Rudy Kozole PTS 10 May 12, 1941 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
16 Win 16–0 Joe Sutka PTS 10 Mar 31, 1941 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
15 Win 15–0 Floyd Howard KO 7 (10) Mar 10, 1941 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
14 Win 14–0 Slaka Cavrich KO 2 (10) Feb 24, 1941 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
13 Win 13–0 Billy Bengal UD 10 Feb 10, 1941 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
12 Win 12–0 Charley Jerome KO 3 (10) Dec 2, 1940 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
11 Win 11–0 Marty Simmons PTS 10 Oct 1, 1940 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
10 Win 10–0 Billy Hood KO 2 (10) Sep 23, 1940 Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
9 Win 9–0 John Reeves PTS 4 Aug 5, 1940 Haft's Acre, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.
8 Win 8–0 Carl Turner PTS 6 Jun 29, 1940 Parkway Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
7 Win 7–0 Young Kid Ash KO 3 (6), 1:20 Jun 17, 1940 Legion Hall, Portsmouth, Ohio, U.S.
6 Win 6–0 Frankie Williams TKO 5 (8), 3:00 Jun 13, 1940 Parkway Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
5 Win 5–0 Charley Banks KO 1 (6), 1:42 Jun 3, 1940 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
4 Win 4–0 Charley Banks PTS 6 May 20, 1940 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
3 Win 3–0 Remo Fernandez PTS 6 Apr 3, 1940 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
2 Win 2–0 John Reeves PTS 6 Mar 27, 1940 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
1 Win 1–0 Melody Johnson KO 4 (4) Mar 12, 1940 Armory, Middletown, Ohio, U.S.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staff, BN (July 7, 2019). "On This Day: Ezzard Charles, one of the greatest fighters of all-time, was born". Boxing News. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  2. ^ "Boxing Hall of Fame names first inductees". UPI.
  3. ^ "Ezzard Charles". Cyber Boxing Zone. Retrieved May 8, 2014.
  4. ^ Newsmakers Interview with Ezzard Charles Jr., WKRC Channel 12, Cincinnati, August 17, 2008
  5. ^ Detloff, William (September 2002). "The 20 Greatest Light Heavyweights of All-Time". The Ring. Vol. 81, no. 10. p. 50.
  6. ^ Will Hammock. "The Champ: County to honor legendary boxer Charles today." Gwinnett Daily Post. June 5, 2010
  7. ^ Newsmakers interview with Ezzard Charles Jr., WKRC Channel 12 Cincinnati, August 17, 2008
  8. ^ Archived at Ghostarchive and the Wayback Machine: "1970's Muscular Dystrophy Commercial with Ezzard Charles". YouTube. March 4, 2013. Retrieved July 29, 2020.
  9. ^ "Ezzard Charles, boxing's 'Quiet Tiger,' dies at 53". Chicago Tribune. May 29, 1975. pp. 4–1, 4-7. Retrieved May 30, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ Guide to 20th Century African American Resources, Cincinnati Historical Society
  11. ^ "IBRO'S 25 Greatest Fighters of All Time". Eastsideboxing.com. Retrieved May 8, 2014.
  12. ^ The Greatest: My Own Story. Muhammad Ali and Richard Durham. 1975.
  13. ^ "All-Time Greatest Boxers". ESPN. March 8, 1971. Retrieved May 8, 2014.
  14. ^ "The Greatest Light Heavyweights of All Time". Archived from the original on September 14, 2009.
  15. ^ "Sam Baroudi". BoxRec.

Further reading[edit]

  • Grace, Kevin & Grace, Joshua (2006). Cincinnati Boxing. Chicago: Arcadia. ISBN 0-7385-4112-5.

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
World boxing titles
Vacant
Title last held by
Joe Louis
NBA heavyweight champion
June 22, 1949 – July 18, 1951
Succeeded by
NYSAC heavyweight champion
September 27, 1950 – July 18, 1951
The Ring heavyweight champion
September 27, 1950 – July 18, 1951
Undisputed heavyweight champion
September 27, 1950 – July 18, 1951