FEDOR (robot)

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Skybot F-850 on August 21, 2019

FEDOR or Feodor (Russian: Фёдор) is a Russian humanoid robot that replicates movements of a remote operator and can perform some actions autonomously[1].Originally intended for rescue operations, it was sent on an experimental mission to the International Space Station in 2019. Fedor is a Russian given male name and an acronym for "final experimental demonstration object research".[2].

History[edit]

The robot, originally called Avatar, was funded by the Ministry of Emergency Situations and intended for rescue operations but its role was later expanded to include space missions.[3] The new name, FEDOR, was announced in 2017 by then Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin.[4] FEDOR is intended to be a platform for development of a series of robots, although the first model was often called Fedor in news media.[5]

In April 2017, a video of FEDOR shooting guns caused a media alarm.[6] Rogozin insisted Russia was not creating a Terminator.[6] After the video was posted, one of the parts suppliers cancelled their relationship with the project.[4]

On 22 August 2019, a FEDOR robot was launched on Soyuz MS-14 to the International Space Station. The plan was for the robot to spend a week and a half aboard the orbital outpost.[7] The model going to space was given the name Skybot F-850.[8]

On 24 August 2019, the Soyuz failed to dock as scheduled with the station, due to a fault with its rendezvous system.[9]

On 27 August 2019, it successfully docked with the Zvezda module of the station.[10]

On 30 August, FEDOR successfully matched plug connectors while weightless, simulating the repair of cables on the station's exterior surface during a spacewalk.[11]

On 6 September 2019, the reentry capsule of the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft, with FEDOR on board but no crew, landed in the designated area in the steppes of Kazaskhtan, south-east of the city of Zhezkazghan.[12][13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fedor - Первый российский антропоморфный робот" [FEDOR - The first Russian anthropomorphic robot] (in Russian). Russian Foundation for Advanced Research Projects in the Defense Industry. 2017-12-21.
  2. ^ "Russian android robot Fedor to acquire self-learning abilities - Science & Space - TASS". TASS. 2016-12-09. Retrieved 7 September 2019.
  3. ^ "Russia creating combatant androids of Avatar type - TASS". TASS. 2014-03-22. Retrieved 7 September 2019.
  4. ^ a b "Аватар для МЧС: как создавали робота-спасателя по имени Федор" [Avatar for Ministry of Emergency Situations: the story of rescue robot Fedor creation] (in Russian). РБК. 2017-12-21.
  5. ^ "Аватар для МЧС: как создавали робота-спасателя по имени Федор" [Avatar for Ministry of Emergency Situations: the story of rescue robot Fedor creation] (in Russian). Russian Foundation for Advanced Research Projects in the Defense Industry. 2017-12-21.
  6. ^ a b Aatif Sulleyman (14 April 2017). "Robot being trained to shoot guns is 'not a Terminator', insists Russian deputy Prime Minister". The Independent.
  7. ^ "Soyuz MS-14 launched to the ISS – August 22, 2019, 03:48 GMT - State space corporation ROSCOSMOS". Roscosmos. 2019-08-22. Retrieved 22 August 2019.
  8. ^ Ackerman, Evan (19 August 2019). "Russian Humanoid Robot to Pilot Soyuz Capsule to ISS This Week". IEEE Spectrum. IEEE. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  9. ^ "Regarding the Soyuz spacecraft docking – August 25, 2019, 06:00 GMT - State space corporation ROSCOSMOS". Roscosmos. 2016-08-25. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  10. ^ "Soyuz MS-14 docked to the ISS – August 27, 2019, 03:10 GMT - State space corporation ROSCOSMOS". Roscosmos. 2019-08-27. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  11. ^ "Skybot F-850 at the ISS – August 30, 2019, 15:00 GMT - State space corporation ROSCOSMOS". Roscosmos. 2019-08-30. Retrieved 30 August 2019.
  12. ^ "Soyuz MS-14 in autonomous flight – September 06, 2019, 18:15 GMT - State space corporation ROSCOSMOS". Roscosmos. 2019-09-06. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  13. ^ "Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft returned to Earth – September 06, 2019, 21:35 GMT - State space corporation ROSCOSMOS". Roscosmos. 2019-09-06. Retrieved 6 September 2019.

External links[edit]

Videos